The Feeling of Meaninglessness

A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy

The Feeling of Meaninglessness

In this book, internationally known Viennese psychiatrist and philosopher Viktor E. Frankl, author of Man's search for Meaning, looks at the human condition in our times. We have never lived under such comfortable conditions, but perhaps never before has it become so clear to us that even if our basic needs are fulfilled, our existential needs are still unfulfilled. Neglect of our existential concerns disables us as much from living life to its fullest as it disables us from weathering the challenges of life. The papers in this book examine the causes of existential frustration and offer practical guidelines and insights on how to overcome meaningless in our lives. "One of the outstanding contributions to psychological thought in the last fifty years."-Carl Rogers "Perhaps the most significant thinking since Freud and Adler."-Gordon C. Allport "These writings are committed to the understanding that the personal dimension has to be considered in order to give hope, purpose and meaning to the windstorms of life."-Elisabeth Knbler-Ross

The Unheard Cry for Meaning

Psychotherapy and Humanism

The Unheard Cry for Meaning

In our age of depersonalization, Frankl teaches the value of living to the fullest. Upon his death in 1997, Viktor E. Frankl was lauded as one of the most influential thinkers of our time. The Unheard Cry for Meaning marked his return to the humanism that made Man's Search for Meaning a bestseller around the world. In these selected essays, written between 1947 and 1977, Dr. Frankl illustrates the vital importance of the human dimension in psychotherapy. Using a wide range of subjects—including sex, morality, modern literature, competitive athletics, and philosophy—he raises a lone voice against the pseudo-humanism that has invaded popular psychology and psychoanalysis. By exploring mankind's remarkable qualities, he brilliantly celebrates each individual's unique potential, while preserving the invaluable traditions of both Freudian analysis and behaviorism.

The Meaning of Meaninglessness

The Meaning of Meaninglessness

What does "meaningless" mean? On the one hand, it signifies simply the absence or lack of meaning. "Zabool" is meaningless just because it doesn't happen to mean anything. "Green flees time lessly" is meaningless, despite a certain semblance of sense, because it runs afoul of certain fundamental rules of linguistic construction. On the other hand, "meaningless" characterizes that peculiar psycho logical state of dread and anxiety much discussed, if not discovered, by the French shortly after the Second World War. The first is primarily linguistic, focusing attention on emotionally neutral questions of linguistic meaning. The second is nonlinguistic, indicating a painful probing of the social psychology of an era, a clinical and literary analysis of 20th century Romanticism. On the one hand, a job for the professional philosopher; on the other hand, a task for the literary critic and the social historian. Is any useful purpose served in trying to combine these two, very different concerns? As the title of this book suggests, I think there is.

On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders

An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis

On the Theory and Therapy of Mental Disorders

Logotherapy and Existential Analysis has been internationally recognized for decades as an empirically supported humanistic school of psychotherapy. Evidence for the growing significance of logotherapy includes institutes, societies and professorships in many countries of the world, as well as conferences and publications. On the Theory and Therapy of Neuroses: An Introduction to Logotherapy and Existential Analysis, the translation of Viktor Frankl's Theorie und Therapie der Neurosen by James M. DuBois, will allow for the first time English-only readers to experience this essential text on logotherapy.

The Felt Meanings of the World

A Metaphysics of Feeling

The Felt Meanings of the World

In a critical dialogue with the metaphysical tradition from Plato to Hegel to contemporary schools of thought, the author convincingly argues that traditional rationalist metaphysics has failed to accomplish its goal of demonstrating the existence of a divine cause and moral purpose of the world. To replace the defective rationalist metaphysics, the author builds a new metaphysics on the idea that moods and affects make manifest the world's felt meanings; he argues that each feature of the world is a felt meaning in the sense that each feature is a source of a feeling-response, if and when it appears. The author asserts that we must synthesize our two ways of knowing-poetic evocations and exact analyses-in order to decide which mood or affect is the appropriate appreciation of any given feature of the world. Smith gives evocative and exact explications of such features as the world's temporality, appearance, and mind-independency, as these features appear in the appropriate recitations.

Meaning in Positive and Existential Psychology

Meaning in Positive and Existential Psychology

This book is a first attempt to combine insights from the two perspectives with regard to the question of meaning by examining a collection of theoretical and empirical works. This volume therefore is destined to become an important addition to psychological literature: both from the viewpoint of the history of ideas (again this would be one of the first times that positive and existentialist psychologies meet) and from the viewpoint of theoretical and empirical research into the meaning concept in psychology.

Changes That Heal

Four Practical Steps to a Happier, Healthier You

Changes That Heal

Many of us struggle with anxiety, loneliness, and feelings of inadequacy. We know that God created us in his image, but how can we be loving when we feel burned out? How can we be free when we struggle with addiction? Will we ever enjoy the complete healing God promises? Changes That Heal by renowned psychologist Dr. Henry Cloud offers a down-to-earth plan to help us recover from the wounds of the past and grow more and more into the image of God. Combining his professional expertise and personal experience, Dr. Cloud guides us through four basic ways to become joy-filled, mature followers of Christ: Connect more deeply with others Separate from others in healthy ways Understand the good and the bad in ourselves and others Grow into greater emotional and spiritual maturity With fascinating case studies and helpful techniques we can start using immediately, Changes That Heal reminds us that God promises to complete his good work in us.

Man's Search for Meaning

Man's Search for Meaning

Viennese psychiatrist tells his grim experiences in a German concentration camp which led him to logotherapy, an existential method of psychiatry.

Modernity, a World of Confusion:Causes

Modernity, a World of Confusion:Causes

Have you ever wondered why society is getting cruder and ruder, with stress, depression and mental illness rising and little joy felt? Why children behave badly and schools are failing? Why trust has vanished with your identity? And why sex is oozing out of every aspect of the culture? We live in a skeptical age with the country splintering into special interest groups claiming to be victims and requiring special treatment, and a Congress thats deadlocked in partisan bickering. There is anger and tension and really intolerable things being tolerated, placing women and children in danger. If you have such questions, this is your book, an inquiry into the spirit of the age. Examined are root causes for the darkened culture, immoral behavior, and rejection of traditions. The age glorifies science and technical progress, and yet is unhappy and sickly. Individualism surmounts community concerns creating narcissistic people tending toward nihilism, where the self is the center of the universe. The postmodern culture throws away things, relationships, and lives, like it disposes of outdated items. Logic is replaced with how I feel, and reliance on personal experience for making decisions. Relativism is accepted in ethics and for determining truth, so that it is my truth and your truth, and objectivity and common sense are lost. Science is erecting the abstract man, who, in the process, has lost heart and a sense of reality, living in a delusional world. The result is a profusion of confusion.