The Female Reader in the English Novel

Between 1752, when Charlotte Lennox published The Female Quixote, and 1824 when Sarah Green wrote Scotch Novel Reading, a number of novels, tales, poems and educational works centre on full-scale critical analyses of female reading ...

The Female Reader in the English Novel

This book examines how reading is represented within the novels of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Contemporary accounts portrayed the female reader in particular as passive and impressionable; liable to identify dangerously with the world of her reading. This study shows that female characters are often active and critical readers, and develop a range of strategies for reading both texts and the world around them. The novels of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Hays, Elizabeth Inchbald, Maria Edgeworth and Jane Austen (among others) reveal a diversity of reading practices, as how the heroine reads is often more important than what she reads. The book combines close stylistic analysis with a consideration of broader intellectual debates of the period, including changing attitudes towards sympathy, physiognomy and portraiture.

Writing the Reader

Configurations of a Cultural Practice in the English Novel Dorothee Birke ... Catherine Golden in her 2003 book Images of the Woman Reader in Victorian British and American Fiction focuses on roughly the same time period as Flint but ...

Writing the Reader

The history of the novel is also a history of shifting views of the value of novel reading. This study investigates how novels themselves participate in this development by featuring reading as a multidimensional cultural practice. English novels about obsessive reading, written in times of medial transition, serve as test cases for a model that brings together analyses of form and content.

The Printed Reader

In Tabitha Gilman Tenney's American novel Female Quixotism (1801), the quixotic Dorcasina behaves with increasing ... De Ritter, Imagining Women Readers; Joe Bray, The Female Reader in the English Novel: From Burney to Austen (New York: ...

The Printed Reader

The Printed Reader explores the transformative power of reading in the eighteenth century, and how this was expressed in the fascination with Don Quixote and in a proliferation of narratives about quixotic readers, readers who attempt to reproduce and embody their readings. Through intersecting readings of quixotic narratives, including work by Charlotte Lennox, Laurence Sterne, George Colman, Richard Graves, and Elizabeth Hamilton, Amelia Dale argues that literature was envisaged as imprinting—most crucially, in gendered terms—the reader’s mind, character, and body. The Printed Reader brings together key debates concerning quixotic narratives, print culture, sensibility, empiricism, book history, and the material text, connecting developments in print technology to gendered conceptualizations of quixotism. Tracing the meanings of quixotic readers’ bodies, The Printed Reader claims the social and political text that is the quixotic reader is structured by the experiential, affective, and sexual resonances of imprinting and impressions. Published by Bucknell University Press. Distributed worldwide by Rutgers University Press.

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Volume 3: The Nineteenth-Century Novel 1820-1880 John Kucich, Patrick Parrinder, Jenny Bourne Taylor. cities made reading an important form of recreation, offering opportunities to meet other female readers at public libraries.

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

This series presents a comprehensive, global and up-to-date history of English-language prose fiction and written ... by a international team of scholars ... -- dust jacket.

Women and Literature in Britain 1700 1800

Vivien Jones, Senior Lecturer in English Vivien Jones. led to the rise of the reading public , which in turn led to the rise of the novel . ? Hunter points out that the real acceleration in literacy occurred ' early on in the ...

Women and Literature in Britain  1700 1800

This book, first published in 2000, is an authoritative volume of new essays on women's writing and reading in the eighteenth century.

The Fallen Woman in the Nineteenth Century English Novel

A sympathetic view of the fallen women in Victorian England begins in the novel. First published in 1984, this book shows that the fallen woman in the nineteenth-century novel is, amongst other things, a direct response to the new society.

The Fallen Woman in the Nineteenth Century English Novel

A sympathetic view of the fallen women in Victorian England begins in the novel. First published in 1984, this book shows that the fallen woman in the nineteenth-century novel is, amongst other things, a direct response to the new society. Through the examination of Dickens, Gaskell, Collins, Moore, Trollope, Gissing and Hardy, it demonstrates that the fallen woman is the first in a long line of sympathetic creations which clash with many prevailing social attitudes, and especially with the supposedly accepted dichotomy of the ‘two women’. This book will be of interest to students of nineteenth-century literature and women in literature.

Writing to the World

... The Woman Reader, 1837–1914 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991); Joe Bray, The Female Reader in the English Novel: From Burney to Austen (New York: Routledge, 2009); April Alliston, “Female Quixotism and the Novel: Character and ...

Writing to the World

Ultimately, Writing to the World is a sophisticated look at the intersection of print and the public sphere.

The Reading of Silence

This is a study of Virginia Woolf's lifelong preoccupation with silence and the barrier between the sayable and the unsayable.

The Reading of Silence

This is a study of Virginia Woolf's lifelong preoccupation with silence and the barrier between the sayable and the unsayable. Using a wide range of thinkers from Kierkegaard to Kristeva and Derrida, Laurence demonstrates convincingly that Woolf was the first modern woman novelist to practice silence in her writing and that, in so doing, she created a new language of the mind and changed the metaphor of silence from one of absence or oppression to one of presence and strength. It suggests new directions for Woolf criticism.

Wollstonecraft s Ghost

See Gary Kelly, Women, Writing and Revolution 1790–1827 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), 144–9, for his analysis of Hamilton's novel and her use of the female reader in it. See Joe Bray, The Female Reader in the English Novel (New York: ...

Wollstonecraft s Ghost

Focusing on the ways in which women writers from across the political spectrum engage with and adapt Wollstonecraft's political philosophy in order to advocate feminist reform, Andrew McInnes explores the aftermath of Wollstonecraft's death, the controversial publication of William Godwin's memoir of his wife, and Wollstonecraft's reception in the early nineteenth century. McInnes positions Wollstonecraft within the context of the eighteenth-century female philosopher figure as a literary archetype used in plays, poetry, polemic and especially novels, to represent the thinking woman and address anxieties about political, religious, and sexual heterodoxy. He provides detailed analyses of the ways in which women writers such as Mary Hays, Elizabeth Hamilton, Amelia Opie, and Maria Edgeworth negotiate Wollstonecraft's reputation as personal, political, and sexual pariah to reformulate her radical politics for a post-revolutionary Britain in urgent need of reform. Frances Burney's The Wanderer and Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, McInnes suggests, work as state-of-the-nation novels, drawing on Wollstonecraft's ideas to explore a changing England. McInnes concludes with an examination of Mary Shelley's engagement with her mother throughout her career as a novelist, arguing that Shelley gradually overcomes her anxiety over her mother's stature to address Wollstonecraft's ideas with increasing confidence.

Feminist Literary Theory

Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 2005); Joe Bray, The Female Reader in the English Novel: From Burney to Austen (London: Routledge, 2009).

Feminist Literary Theory

Now in its third edition, Feminist Literary Theory remains the most comprehensive, single volume introduction to a vital and diverse field Fully revised and updated to reflect changes in the field over the last decade Includes extracts from all the major critics, critical approaches and theoretical positions in contemporary feminist literary studies Features a new section, Writing 'Glocal', which covers feminism's dialogue with postcolonial, global and spatial studies Revised chapter introductions provide readers with helpful contextual information while extensive notes offer recommendations for further reading

Handbook of the English Novel of the Twentieth and Twenty First Centuries

scene in which Tommy reads Anna's notebooks without her permission as the novel's “primal scene”, arguing that “[w]hen Molly's son Tommy presumes to read her notebooks without asking, this act of male aggression is, in my reading, ...

Handbook of the English Novel of the Twentieth and Twenty First Centuries

The Handbook systematically charts the trajectory of the English novel from its emergence as the foremost literary genre in the early twentieth century to its early twenty-first century status of eccentric eminence in new media environments. Systematic chapters address ̒The English Novel as a Distinctly Modern Genreʼ, ̒The Novel in the Economy’, ̒Genres’, ̒Gender’ (performativity, masculinities, feminism, queer), and ̒The Burden of Representationʼ (class and ethnicity). Extended contextualized close readings of more than twenty key texts from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1899) to Tom McCarthy’s Satin Island (2015) supplement the systematic approach and encourage future research by providing overviews of reception and theoretical perspectives.

The Language of Jane Austen

The book demonstrates that the wit and humour of her fiction is derived instead from a complex and subtle interplay between different styles.

The Language of Jane Austen

Joe Bray’s careful analysis of Jane Austen’s stylistic techniques reveals that the genius of her writing is far from effortless; rather he makes the case for her as a meticulous craftswoman and a radical stylistic pioneer. Countering those who have detected in her novels a dominant, authoritative perspective, Bray begins by highlighting the complex, ever-shifting and ambiguous nature of the point of view through which her narratives are presented. This argument is then advanced through an exploration of the subtle representation of speech, thought and writing in Austen’s novels. Subsequent chapters investigate and challenge the common critical associations of Austen’s style with moral prescriptivism, ideas of balance and harmony, and literal as opposed to figurative expression. The book demonstrates that the wit and humour of her fiction is derived instead from a complex and subtle interplay between different styles. This compelling reassessment of Austen’s language will offer a valuable resource for students and scholars of stylistics, English literature and language and linguistics.

An Introduction to Eighteenth Century Fiction

... however, Patricia Meyer Spacks can now begin her Desire and Truth: Functions of Plot in Eighteenth-Century English Novels (1990) with a reading of what she recognizes as that 'minor classic', Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote.

An Introduction to Eighteenth Century Fiction

The formal and expressive range of canonic eighteenth-century fiction is enourmous: between them Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett and Sterne seem to have anticipated just about every question confronting the modern novelist; and Aphra Behn even raises a number of issues overlooked by her male successors. But one might also reverse the coin: much of what is present in these writers will today seem remote and bizarre. There is, in fact, only one novelist from the 'long' eighteenth century who is not an endangered species outside the protectorates of university English departments: Jane Austen. Plenty of people read her, moreover, without the need for secondary literature. These reservations were taken into account in the writing of this book. An Introduction to Eighteenth Century Fiction is a comprehensive and accessible introduction to English fiction from Aphra Behn to Jane Austen. It deals with novel criticism, canon formation and relations between genre and gender. The second part of the book contains an extensive discussion of Richardson and Fielding, followed by paired readings of major eighteenth-century novels, juxtaposing texts by Behn and Defoe, Sterne and Smollett, Lennox and Burney among others. The various sections of the book, and even the individual chapters, may be read independently or in any order. Works are discussed in a way intended to help students who have not read them, and even engage with some who never will. The author consumes eighteenth-century fiction avidly, but has tried to write a reader-friendly survey for those who may not.

Eighteenth Century Authorship and the Play of Fiction

Novels and the Theater, Haywood to Austen Emily Hodgson Anderson ... The Epistolary Novel Representations of Consciousness Joe Bray 2. ... The Female Reader in the English Novel From Burney to Austen Joe Bray 6.

Eighteenth Century Authorship and the Play of Fiction

This study looks at developments in eighteenth-century drama that influenced the rise of the novel; it begins by asking why women writers of this period experimented so frequently with both novels and plays. Here, Eliza Haywood, Frances Burney, Elizabeth Inchbald, Maria Edgeworth, and Jane Austen explore theatrical frames--from the playhouse, to the social conventions of masquerade, to the fictional frame of the novel itself—that encourage audiences to dismiss what they contain as feigned. Yet such frames also, as a result, create a safe space for self-expression. These authors explore such payoffs both within their work—through descriptions of heroines who disguise themselves to express themselves—and through it. Reading the act of authorship as itself a form of performance, Anderson contextualizes the convention of fictionality that accompanied the development of the novel; she notes that as the novel, like the theater of the earlier eighteenth century, came to highlight its fabricated nature, authors could use it as a covert yet cathartic space. Fiction for these authors, like theatrical performance for the actor, thus functions as an act of both disclosure and disguise—or finally presents self-expression as the ability to oscillate between the two, in "the play of fiction."

The Woman Reader

By 1856 Havard had sold an astonishing 60 million books. The age of the large edition, cheap paperback had arrived. From now on the French book trade, like the English, was driven not by the tastes of a relatively small elite, ...

The Woman Reader

Explores what and how women of widely differing cultures have read through the ages, from Cro-Magnon caves to the digital readers of today, drawing distinctions between male and female readers and detailing how female literacy has been suppressed in some parts of the world.

Jean Jacques Rousseau and British Romanticism

'The Politics of Seduction in British Fiction of the 1790s: The Female Reader and Julie, ou La Nouvelle Héloïse'. Eighteenth-Century Fiction 11, no. 4 (1999): 459–76. Hamilton, Elizabeth. Letters on Education. Bath: R. Cruttwell, 1801.

Jean Jacques Rousseau and British Romanticism

Bringing together leading scholars from the USA, UK and Europe, this is the first substantial study of the seminal influence of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on British Romanticism. Reconsidering Rousseau's connection to canonical Romantic authors such as Wordsworth, Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and British Romanticism also explores his impact on a wide range of literature, including anti-Jacobin fiction, educational works, familiar essays, nature writing and political discourse. Convincingly demonstrating that the relationship between Rousseau's thought and British Romanticism goes beyond mere reception or influence to encompass complex forms of connection, transmission and appropriation, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and British Romanticism is a vital new contribution to scholarly understanding of British Romantic literature and its transnational contexts.

Revolution and the Form of the British Novel 1790 1825

This is a brilliant and innovative reading of the place of the novel in the reformulation of British national identity in the Napoleonic period, throwing new light on writers as diverse as Hazlitt, Charlotte Smith, Walter Scott, Helen Maria ...

Revolution and the Form of the British Novel  1790 1825

Whatever happened to the epistolary novel? Why was it that by 1825 the principal narrative form of eighteenth-century fiction had been replaced by the third-person and often historicized models which have predominated ever since? Nicola Watson's original and wide-ranging study charts the suppression of epistolary fiction, exploring the attempted radicalization of the genre by Wollstonecraft and other feminists in the 1790s; its rejection and parody by Jane Austen and Maria Edgeworth: the increasingly discredited role played by letters in the historical novels of Jane Porter, Sydney Morgan, and Walter Scott; and their troubling, ghostly presence in the gothic narratives of James Hogg and Charles Maturin. The shift in narrative method is seen as a response to anxieties about the French Revolution, with the epistolary, feminized, and sentimental plot replaced by a more authoritarian third-person mode as part of a wider redrawing of the relation between the individual and social consensus. This is a brilliant and innovative reading of the place of the novel in the reformulation of British national identity in the Napoleonic period, throwing new light on writers as diverse as Hazlitt, Charlotte Smith, Walter Scott, Helen Maria Williams, and Byron.

A Partial Study of the Female Characters of Henry Fielding s Novels

The Story of Women Harper & Brothers New York ..... 1925 . Gosse , Eimund Wm ... A History of Eighteenth Century Literature Facili llan ... The fiddle Class Reader and the English Novel in Journal of Eng . and Ger . Phil . Vol . XXV .

A Partial Study of the Female Characters of Henry Fielding s Novels


The Literary Channel

the novel is “the inclination towards obscene scenes, the amalgamation of voluptuousness and cruelty,” often in the ... how often British critics deemed French fiction unfit for young readers but does not convey how often female readers ...

The Literary Channel

In the Channel zone, the novel developed through interactions among texts, readers, writers, and translators that inextricably linked national literary cultures. It served as a forum to promote and critique nationalist cliches, whether from the standpoint of Enlightenment cosmopolitanism, the insurgent nationalism of colonized spaces, or the non-nationalized culture of consumption. In the process, the Channel zone promoted codes that became the genre's hallmarks, including the sentimental poetics that would shape fiction through the nineteenth century.

A Reader s Guide to the Contemporary English Novel

Clearly following D. H. Lawrence in his attempt to " free " the English novel , Durrell suggests that sexual love — almost the only kind that exists for him — is a form of knowledge , literally as well as etymologically .

A Reader s Guide to the Contemporary English Novel

In this study, Frederick R. Karl defines and evaluates the main movements in the English novel beginning with Joyce. Karl devotes separate chapters to the works of C. P. Snow, Samuel Beckett, Ivy Compton-Burnett, Graham Greene, Lawrence Durrell, Elizabeth Bowen, Evelyn Waugh, George Orwell, Henry Greene, and Joyce Cary. In a series of composite chapters he considers Iris Murdoch, Anthony Powell, the Angry Young Men, Rosamond Lehmann, Nigel Dennis, William Golding, Doris Lessing, and Angus Wilson.