The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur n

The chapters of this volume include: Arthur Jeffery, Foreword, Introduction, The Foreign Words, and Bibliography.

The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur    n

This antiquarian book contains a detailed treatise on the vocabulary of the Qur'an, being a comprehensive study of a number of the non-Arabic elements of the Qur an's vocabulary. This book will appeal to students of philology and those with an interest in the linguistic elements of the Qur'an, and it would make for a worthy addition to collections of literature of this ilk. The chapters of this volume include: Arthur Jeffery, Foreword, Introduction, The Foreign Words, and Bibliography. Many antiquarian books such as this are increasingly hard-to-come-by and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author."

The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur n

Republication of Arthur Jeffery's important study, "The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur'?n," offers a new generation of scholars and students access to this foundational text.

The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur    n

Republication of Arthur Jeffery's important study, "The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qur'?n," offers a new generation of scholars and students access to this foundational text. Arranged in Arabic alphabetical order, Jeffery's compendium of philological scholarship remains an indispensable tool for any serious study of Qur'?nic semantics. Drawing upon etymological examination of languages such as Greek, Persian, Syriac, Ethiopic, Coptic and Nabataean, Jeffery's work illuminates the rich linguistic texture of Islam's holy book. His lengthy introductory essay explores the exegetical analysis offered by medieval Muslim commentators as well as the insights provided by more recent research.

New Perspectives on the Qur an

Western-language works For a long time, one of the most widely cited and most widely used sources on Qurʾānic vocabulary was Arthur Jeffery's 1938 The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qurʾān, recently reissued.35 Jeffery analyzes 322 loanwords ...

New Perspectives on the Qur an

This book continues the work of The Qur’ān in its Historical Context, in which an international group of scholars address an expanded range of topics on the Qur’ān and its origins, looking beyond medieval Islamic traditions to present the Qur’ān’s own conversation with the religions and literatures of its day. Particular attention is paid to recent debates and controversies in the field, and to uncovering the Qur’ān’s relationship with Judaism and Christianity. After a foreword by Abdolkarim Soroush, chapters by renowned experts cover: method in Qur'ānic Studies analysis of material evidence, including inscriptions and ancient manuscripts, for what they show of the Qur'ān’s origins the language of the Qur'ān and proposed ways to emend our reading of the Qur'ān how our knowledge of the religious groups at the time of the Qur'ān’s emergence might contribute to a better understanding of the text the Qur'ān’s conversation with Biblical literature and traditions that challenge the standard understanding of the holy book. This debate of recent controversial proposals for new interpretations of the Qur'ān will shed new light on the Qur’anic passages that have been shrouded in mystery and debate. As such, it will be a valuable reference for scholars of Islam, the Qur’an, Christian-Muslim relations and the Middle East.

The Poetic Qur n

Regarding the so - called foreign word , it remains a peculiar paradox that both ritual and poetic language within many ... 36 Arthur Jeffery , The Foreign Vocabulary of the Quran ( Baroda : Oriental Institute , 1938 ) , Andrew Rippin ...

The Poetic Qur    n

Slightly revised version of the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Copenhagen.

The Persian Presence in the Islamic World

... ( MPers . rõšn “ light , ” NPers . rowšan ) ; rizq , “ livelihood , bounty , ” razaqa , “ to provide for , to provide nourishment ” ( from MPers . rozīg through Syriac ; see Jeffery , The Foreign Vocabulary of the Quran , pp .

The Persian Presence in the Islamic World

The thirteenth volume based on the Giorgio Levi Della Vida conference reassesses the role of the Iranian peoples in the development and consolidation of Islamic civilization. In his key essay, Ehsan Yarshater casts fresh light on that role challenging the view that, after reaching a climax in Baghdad in the ninth century, Islamic culture entered a period of decline. In fact, he maintains, a new and remarkably creative phase began in Khurasan and Transoxania, symbolized by the adoption of Persian as a medium of literary expression. By the mid-sixteenth century, Persian literary and intellectual paradigms had spread from Anatolia to India, encompassing the greater part of the Islamic world. Yarshater also challenges traditional assumptions about the 'Islamization of Persia'. In the essays which follow, six distinguished scholars consider the historical, cultural, and religious aspects of the Persian presence in the Islamic world.

The Qu ran as Text

27 23 Q. 6/152 ; on qist see Arthur Jeffery , The foreign vocabulary of the Quran ( Baroda , 1938 ) , 237–8 ; also note the use of qistās ( see Foreign vocabulary , 238-9 ) in similar phrases : Q. 17/35 within a contemporary situation ...

The Qu  ran as Text

This collection of papers focusses on the literary, the text-linguistic, the intertextual, and the receptional aspects of the Qur anic text. Using modern methodology can open the way towards a more adequate hermeneutical approach to the Qur an.

The Qur n in Context

tHe etYMoLoGICAL FALLACY AnD QURʾAnIC stUDIes: MUHAMMAD, PARADIse, AnD LAte AntIQUItY* Walid A saleh Albrecht Noth gewidmet Introduction The voluminous secondary literature on the Qurʾan that discusses its supposedly foreign vocabulary ...

The Qur  n in Context

By addressing various aspects of the Qur'?n's linguistic and historical context and offering close readings of selected passages in the light of Jewish, Christian, and ancient Arabic literature, the volume seeks to stimulate a new interaction between literary and historical scholarship.

Routledge Handbook on Early Islam

of the 6th and 7th centuries, exemplified in the Qurʾān, to reflect this fact. The most cogent summary of the foreign vocabulary of the Qurʾān was penned by Arthur Jeffery (d. 1959); indeed, so powerful was his book that there have been ...

Routledge Handbook on Early Islam

The formative period of Islam remains highly contested. From the beginning of modern scholarship on this formative period, scholars have questioned traditional Muslim accounts on early Islam. The scholarly fixation is mirrored by sectarian groups and movements within Islam, most of which trace their origins to this period. Moreover, contemporary movements from Salafists to modernists continue to point to Islam’s origins to justify their positions. This Handbook provides a definitive overview of early Islam and how this period was understood and deployed by later Muslims. It is split into four main parts, the first of which explores the debates and positions on the critical texts and figures of early Islam. The second part turns to the communities that identified their origins with the Qurʾān and Muḥammad. In addition to the development of Muslim identities and polities, of particular focus is the relationship with groups outside or movements inside of the umma (the collective community of Muslims). The third part looks beyond what happened from the 7th to the 9th centuries CE and explores what that period, the events, figures, and texts have meant for Muslims in the past and what they mean for Muslims today. Not all Muslims or scholars are willing to merely reinterpret early Islam and its sources, though; some are willing to jettison parts, or even all, of the edifice that has been constructed over almost a millennium and a half. The Handbook therefore concludes with discussions of re-imaginations and revisions of early Islam and its sources. Almost every major debate in the study of Islam and among Muslims looks to the formative period of Islam. The wide range of contributions from many of the leading academic experts on the subject therefore means that this book will be a valuable resource for all students and scholars of Islamic studies, as well as for anyone with an interest in early Islam.

The Qur an in Its Historical Context

Arthur Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the Quran, Baroda: Oriental Institute, 1938, 31–2. As I have pointed out in my entry on “Foreign Vocabulary” EQ. Jeffery, Foreign Vocabulary, for example, 38. François de Blois, “Nasrani and ...

The Qur   an in Its Historical Context

Providing commentary on the controversial revisionist school of Qur’anic studies, this book explores the origins, scholarship and development of the Qur'an. The collection of articles, each written by a distinguished author, treat very familiar passages of the Qur’an in an original manner, combining thorough philology, historical anthropology, and cultural history. This book addresses in a critical fashion the hottest issues in recent works on the Quran. Among other things, the contributors analyze the controversial theories of Luxenberg regarding Syriac and the Quran, and in particular his argument that the term Hur refers not to virgins but to grapes.

Israel and Hellas

The foreign vocabulary is shown as deeply rooted in Palestinian Aramaic by its appearance in Rabbinic ( where Aramaic and Hebrew are nearly interchangeable ) ; and in the Arabic of the Quran ! Echoes of Gospel and Talmud in the mouth of ...

Israel and Hellas


The Qur an s Reformation of Judaism and Christianity

36 Arthur Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qurʾān, with a foreword by Gerhard Böwering and Jane Dammen McAuliffe (Texts and studies on the Qurʾān, 3; Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2007) [1938].

The Qur an s Reformation of Judaism and Christianity

This volume explores the relationship between the Qur’an and the Jewish and Christian traditions, considering aspects of continuity and reform. The chapters examine the Qur’an’s retelling of biblical narratives, as well as its reaction to a wide array of topics that mark Late Antique religious discourse, including eschatology and ritual purity, prophetology and paganism, and heresiology and Christology. Twelve emerging and established scholars explore the many ways in which the Qur’an updates, transforms, and challenges religious practice, beliefs, and narratives that Late Antique Jews and Christians had developed in dialogue with the Bible. The volume establishes the Qur’an’s often unique perspective alongside its surprising continuity with Judaism and Christianity. Chapters focus on individual suras and on intra-Qur’anic parallels, on the Qur’an’s relationship to pre-Islamic Arabian culture, on its intertextuality and its literary intricacy, and on its legal and moral framework. It illustrates a move away from the problematic paradigm of cultural influence and instead emphasizes the Qur’an’s attempt to reform the religious landscape of its time. The Qur'an's Reformation of Judaism and Christianity offers new insight into the Islamic Scripture as a whole and into recent methodological developments, providing a compelling snapshot of the burgeoning field of Qur’anic studies. It is a key resource for students and scholars interested in religion, Islam, and Middle Eastern Studies.

Illuminationist Texts and Textual Studies

Though barzakh appears in the Qurʾān, some consider it to be a non-Arabic, Persian term, on which further below.15 We know that interactions between Persia and Arabia in the ... 16 Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qurʾān, pp.

Illuminationist Texts and Textual Studies

This book offers a wide range of fresh and original contributions by a distinguished group of scholars. It will be recognized as a major scholarly publication by all those interested in Islamic and Iranian intellectual history and philosophy and those working in the field of comparative philosophy.

The Semantics of Qur anic Language al ira

102 Arthur Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qurʾān, (Baroda: Oriental Institute, 1938), p. vii. 103 Ibid. 104 For a survey of the linguistic situation in Arabia see M.C.A. Macdonald's “Reflections on the Linguistic Map of ...

The Semantics of Qur  anic Language  al      ira

In The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira, Ghassan el Masri makes the case for etymologia as a late antique tool for producing discursive authority in the Qurʾān, and applies it to a multifaceted interpretation of the Qurʾān’s main eschatological concept.

The Legacy of Iranian Imperialism and the Individual

Akkadian, Iranian, Greek and Latin.5 The foreign vocabulary is shown as deeply rooted in Palestinian Aramaic by its appearance in Rabbinic (where Aramaic and Hebrew are nearly interchangeable); and in the Arabic of the Quran!6 Echoes of ...

The Legacy of Iranian Imperialism and the Individual

The series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) covers all areas of research into the Old Testament, focusing on the Hebrew Bible, its early and later forms in Ancient Judaism, as well as its branching into many neighboring cultures of the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world.

Angels in Islam

C. Luxemburg, Die SyroAramäische Lesartdes Koran: Ein Beitrag zur Entschüsselung der Koransprache, Berlin: Schiller, 2000. A new edition of Jeffery's Foreign Vocabulary has also been published: A. Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the ...

Angels in Islam

Angels are a basic tenet of belief in Islam, appearing in various types and genres of text, from eschatology to law and theology to devotional material. This book presents the first comprehensive study of angels in Islam, through an analysis of a collection of traditions (hadīth) compiled by the 15th century polymath Jalāl al-Dīn al-Suyūtī (d. 911/1505). With a focus on the principal angels in Islam, the author provides an analysis and critical translation of hadith included in al-Suyuti’s al-Haba’ik fi akhbar al-mala’ik (‘The Arrangement of the Traditions about Angels’) – many of which are translated into English for the first time. The book discusses the issues that the hadīth raise, exploring why angels are named in particular ways; how angels are described and portrayed in the hadīth; the ways in which angels interact with humans; and the theological controversies which feature angels. From this it is possible to place al-Suyūtī’s collection in its religious and historical milieu, building on the study of angels in Judaism and Christianity to explore aspects of comparative religious beliefs about angels as well as relating Muslim beliefs about angels to wider debates in Islamic Studies. Broadening the study of Islamic angelology and providing a significant amount of newly translated primary source material, this book will be of great interest to scholars of Islam, divinity, and comparative religion.