The Formation of the Pentateuch

This volume seeks to stimulate international discussion about the Pentateuch in order to help the discipline move toward a set of shared assumptions and a common discourse.

The Formation of the Pentateuch

The Pentateuch lies at the heart of the Western humanities. Yet despite nearly two centuries of scholarship, its historical origins and its literary history are still a subject of intense discussion. Critical scholarship has isolated multiple layers of tradition, inconsistent laws, and narratives that could only have originated from separate communities within ancient Israel, and were joined together at a relatively late stage by a process of splicing and editing. Recent developments in academic biblical studies, however, jeopardize the revolutionary progress that has been accomplished over the last two centuries. The past forty years of scholarship have witnessed not simply a proliferation of intellectual models, but the fragmentation of discourse within the three main research centers of Europe, Israel, and North America. Even when they employ the same terminology (redactor, author, source, exegesis), scholars often mean quite different things. Concepts taken for granted by one group of scholars (such as the existence of the Elohist source) are dismissed out of hand by other scholarly communities. In effect, independent and sometimes competing scholarly discourses have emerged in Europe, Israel, and North America. Each centers on the Pentateuch, each operates with its own set of working assumptions, and each is confident of its own claims. This volume seeks to stimulate international discussion about the Pentateuch in order to help the discipline move toward a set of shared assumptions and a common discourse. With the wide range of perspectives examined, this publication is an invaluable resource for subsequent research.

The Pentateuch

And human beings , who emerge as God's creation , are given moral responsibilities . God's image is implanted in them . They are charged with care of the Earth . Their transgressions of the divine injunctions in the Garden of Eden lead ...

The Pentateuch

This book assumes questions that perceptive readers of all persuasions might ask about the Bible. These questions pertain both to the nature of the text and the text itself. With regard to the former, its historical development is described in reverse order, back through 16th century England to the definitive Hebrew text from which all modern translations are made, the Leningrad Codex, dated 1008 CE. The development continues through prior centuries, importantly, to the Dead Sea Scrolls, which raise new questions about which text to translate. The Pentateuch throughout is discussed with the question in mind: Is it history or story? The great wealth of information, both material and literary, which archaeology has provided over the last one and half centuries as well as the intensive literary analysis of biblical scholars is brought to bear on the text. The attempt is made to provide information not commonly known to the general reader in searching for an answer to the question. The identification of literary traditions with their theological perspectives serves to show the diversity of the material amidst its overall unity. The traditions, which make up the Old Testament, did not end with our canon, whether Jewish, Catholic or Protestant. A group of these later books, known as Apocrypha, are included in some Bibles but not in others. A large number of other books, known as Pseudepigrapha, represent the continuation of the traditions. Those related to Genesis, as well as the ambivalent status of the Apocrypha, are discussed here.

The Promise of the Land as Oath

The series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) covers all areas of research into the Old Testament, focusing on the Hebrew Bible, its early and later forms in Ancient Judaism, as well as its branching ...

The Promise of the Land as Oath

The series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) covers all areas of research into the Old Testament, focusing on the Hebrew Bible, its early and later forms in Ancient Judaism, as well as its branching into many neighboring cultures of the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world.

The Oxford Handbook of the Pentateuch

In The Formation of the Pentateuch : Bridging the Intellectual Cultures of Europe , Israel , and North America , edited by J. C. Gertz et al . , 483-489 . FAT 111 . Tübingen : Mohr Siebeck . Eissfeldt , O. 1927.

The Oxford Handbook of the Pentateuch

Featuring contributions from internationally-recognized scholars in the study of the Pentateuch, this volume provides a comprehensive survey of key topics and issues in contemporary pentateuchal scholarship. The Oxford Handbook of the Pentateuch considers recent debates about the formation of the Pentateuch and their implications for biblical scholarship. At the same time, it addresses a number of issues that relate more broadly to the social and intellectual worlds of the Pentateuch. This includes engagements with questions of archaeology and history, the Pentateuch and the Samaritans, the relation between the Pentateuch and other Moses traditions in the Second Temple period, the Pentateuch and social memory, and more. Crucially, the Handbook situates its discussions of current developments in pentateuchal studies in relation to the field's long history, one that in its modern, critical phase is now more than two centuries old. By showcasing both this rich history and the leading edges of the field, this collection provides a clear account of pentateuchal studies and a fresh sense of its vitality and relevance within biblical studies, religious studies, and the broader humanities.

The Pentateuch in the Twentieth Century

In contrast to Rendtorff , however , stand such scholars as John Van Seters , Sven Tengström , and Norman Whybray who have re - emphasized the creative role of authors in the formation and composition of the Pentateuch .

The Pentateuch in the Twentieth Century

But the Documentary Hypothesis should remain our primary point of reference, and it alone provides the most dependable perspective from which to approach this most difficult of areas in the study of the Old Testament.

The Pentateuch

Its goal was to recover the oldest individual oral sagas in the Pentateuch in order to retrieve the taproot of religious experience. The Pentateuch was not interpreted as a whole. The lack of focus on the formation of the Pentateuch ...

The Pentateuch

The Pentateuch is the heart of the Hebrew Bible and the foundational document of Judaism. It is also the focus of tremendous scholarly exploration and debate today regarding the complex history of its composition. This history will be explored along with analysis of the historical background and ancient Near Eastern parallels for its primeval history, its ancestry narratives, and laws, the theological purposes of its final redaction, and the diverse ways it is interpreted in communities today. In this textbook, Thomas B. Dozeman, one of the leading scholars of the Pentateuch today, introduces students to its contents and structure of each book, and orients them to the Pentateuch’s place in the Hebrew Bible and in the interpretive traditions of Judaism and Christianity. Dozeman deftly introduces the key interpretive questions and methods that shape contemporary scholarship and explains their consequences, inviting students into the invigorating work of interpretation today. Pedagogical features include images, maps, timelines, reading lists, and a glossary.

The Pentateuch as Torah

The author's thesis is that the origin of the Pentateuch should be linked to two related developments: the constitution ... In his innovative and suggestive study, entitled “Scribal Scholarship in the Formation of Torah and Prophets: A ...

The Pentateuch as Torah

Since antiquity, the five books of Moses have served as a sacred constitution, foundational for both Jews and Samaritans. However long the process of accepting the Pentateuch as authoritative tōrâ (“instruction”) took, this was by all accounts a monumental achievement in the history of these peoples and indeed an important moment in the history of the ancient world. In the long development of Western societies, the Pentateuch has served as a major influence on the development of law, political philosophy, and social thought. The question is: how, where, and why did this process of acceptance occur, when did it occur, and how long did it take?

Old Testament Interpretation

FORMATION. OF. THE. PENTATEUCH. David L. Petersen namely, a concern with its history, how it came to exist. To be sure, not all scholars today are interested in this issue. Some would prefer to talk about the literary configuration of ...

Old Testament Interpretation

This volume provides an introduction to the changing terrain of contemporary Old Testament Study. The essays orient the reader to all the major sections of Old Testament study, serving also to engage the reader in the work of Old Testament interpretation. The Festschrift in honour of Gene M. Tucker contains sections on the Torah, the Prophets, Writings, and the Context of the books of the Old Testament. The parts work in conjunction to give the reader a guide to the key issues in the history of interpretation of the Old Testament.

The Formation of the Hebrew Bible

David Carr rethinks both the methods and historical orientation points for research into the growth of the Hebrew Bible into its present form.

The Formation of the Hebrew Bible

In The Formation of the Hebrew Bible David Carr rethinks both the methods and orientation points for research into the growth of the Hebrew Bible. The method is a ''methodologically modest'' investigation drawing criteria, aims and models from Carr's survey of documented examples of textual revision. The result is a radically new picture of the formation of the Hebrew Bible from the tenth to the first centuries BCE.

The Formation of Genesis 1 11

This book synthesizes prior scholarship to show how both the P and non-Priestly strata of Genesis also emerged out of a complex interaction by Judean scribes with non-biblical literary traditions, particularly with Mesopotamian textual ...

The Formation of Genesis 1 11

There is general agreement in the field of Biblical studies that study of the formation of the Pentateuch is in disarray. David M. Carr turns to the Genesis Primeval History, Genesis 1-11, to offer models for the formation of Pentateuchal texts that may have traction within this fractious context. Building on two centuries of historical study of Genesis 1-11, this book provides new support for the older theory that the bulk of Genesis 1-11 was created out of a combination of two originally separate source strata: a Priestly source and an earlier non-Priestly source that was used to supplement the Priestly framework. Though this overall approach contradicts some recent attempts to replace such source models with theories of post-Priestly scribal expansion, Carr does find evidence of multiple layers of scribal revision in the non-P and P sources, from the expansion of an early independent non-Priestly primeval history with a flood narrative and related materials to a limited set of identifiable layers of Priestly material that culminate in the P-like redaction of the whole. This book synthesizes prior scholarship to show how both the P and non-Priestly strata of Genesis also emerged out of a complex interaction by Judean scribes with non-biblical literary traditions, particularly with Mesopotamian textual traditions about primeval origins. The Formation of Genesis 1-11 makes a significant contribution to scholarship on one of the most important texts in the Hebrew Bible and will influence models for the formation of the Hebrew Bible as a whole.

Inconsistency in the Torah

23 Two major conferences have been held in recent years devoted to the topic of Pentateuch formation. Not a single paper presented at either conference utilized linguistics in any significant way to delineate the prehistory of the ...

Inconsistency in the Torah

Inconsistency in the Torah

An Introduction to the Old Testament Pentateuch

ALTERNATIVE VIEWS OF THE FORMATION OF THE PENTATEUCH Most scholars do not believe that Moses wrote much of the Pentateuch, and many would argue that he wrote none of it. They base their arguments on literary, historical, and theological ...

An Introduction to the Old Testament Pentateuch

The Pentateuch--Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy--are the vital first books in the Bible. understanding the scope, meaning, and events of these five books is integral to understanding the whole of Scripture that follows. Old Testament expert Herbert Wolf provides layreaders and scholars alike with a strong undergirding of understanding and knowledge in this introduction that reveals both the seriousness and excitement of the Pentateuch. Readers will find Adam, Abraham, Joseph, Moses and Joshua in these pages, as well as terrible sin and glorious forgiveness, bloody sacrifices and battles, deadly betrayal and life-giving hope. Wolf first addresses the overarching themes that flow through the Pentateuch, with special attention given to Moses as author of the five books. He then addresses each book specifically, covering topics such as purpose and scope, and literary structure. He tailors additional study to each specific book. This book contributes significantly to a clear, deep understanding of the Bible's first five books.

The Cambridge Companion to the Hebrew Bible Old Testament

Interpreters continue to argue both for sources and for a process of supplementation to account for the formation of the Pentateuch. Yet there is also a trend toward progressively later dating of the Pentateuch, which will undoubtedly ...

The Cambridge Companion to the Hebrew Bible Old Testament

This Companion offers a concise and engaging introduction to the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. Providing an up-to-date 'snapshot' of scholarship, it includes essays, specially commissioned for this volume, by twenty-three leading scholars. The volume examines a range of topics, including the historical and religious contexts for the contents of the biblical canon, and critical approaches and methods, as well as newer topics such as the Hebrew Bible in Islam, Western art and literature, and contemporary politics. This Companion is an excellent resource for students at university and graduate level, as well as for laypeople and scholars in other fields who would like to gain an understanding of the current state of the academic discussion. The book does not presume prior knowledge, nor does it engage in highly technical discussions, but it does go into greater detail than a typical introductory textbook.

The Formation of the Biblical Canon Volume 1

In these two volumes -- in sum more than double the length of his previous works -- McDonald presents his most in-depth overview to date.

The Formation of the Biblical Canon  Volume 1

Lee Martin McDonald provides a magisterial overview of the development of the biblical canon --- the emergence of the list of individual texts that constitutes the Christian bible. In these two volumes -- in sum more than double the length of his previous works -- McDonald presents his most in-depth overview to date. McDonald shows students and researchers how the list of texts that constitute 'the bible' was once far more fluid than it is today and guides readers through the minefield of different texts, different versions, and the different lists of texts considered 'canonical' that abounded in antiquity. Questions of the origin and transmission of texts are introduced as well as consideration of innovations in the presentation of texts, collections of documents, archaeological finds and Church councils. In this first volume McDonald reexamines issues of canon formation once considered settled, and sets the range of texts that make up the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament) in their broader context. Each indidvidual text is discussed, as are the cultural, political and historical situations surrounding them. The second volume considers the New Testament, and the range of so-called 'apocryphal' gospels that were written in early centuries, and used by many Christian groups before the canon was closed. Also included are comprehensive appendices which show various canon lists for both Old and New Testaments and for the bible as a whole.

The Formation of Genesis 1 11

Jean Louis Ska [Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2009], 1–22); David Petersen, “The Formation of the Pentateuch,” in Old Testament Interpretation: Past, Present, and Future. Essays in Honor of Gene M. Tucker, ed. David Petersen, James L. Mayes, ...

The Formation of Genesis 1 11

There is general agreement in the field of Biblical studies that study of the formation of the Pentateuch is in disarray. David M. Carr turns to the Genesis Primeval History, Genesis 1-11, to offer models for the formation of Pentateuchal texts that may have traction within this fractious context. Building on two centuries of historical study of Genesis 1-11, this book provides new support for the older theory that the bulk of Genesis 1-11 was created out of a combination of two originally separate source strata: a Priestly source and an earlier non-Priestly source that was used to supplement the Priestly framework. Though this overall approach contradicts some recent attempts to replace such source models with theories of post-Priestly scribal expansion, Carr does find evidence of multiple layers of scribal revision in the non-P and P sources, from the expansion of an early independent non-Priestly primeval history with a flood narrative and related materials to a limited set of identifiable layers of Priestly material that culminate in the P-like redaction of the whole. This book synthesizes prior scholarship to show how both the P and non-Priestly strata of Genesis also emerged out of a complex interaction by Judean scribes with non-biblical literary traditions, particularly with Mesopotamian textual traditions about primeval origins. The Formation of Genesis 1-11 makes a significant contribution to scholarship on one of the most important texts in the Hebrew Bible and will influence models for the formation of the Hebrew Bible as a whole.

The Formation of the Hebrew Bible

Indeed, aside from the Rebuilding-Ezra Narrative discussed above, all of the potential Persian-period texts discussed so far lack strong reflections of the broader Pentateuch we now have. The Nehemiah Memoir draws at various points on ...

The Formation of the Hebrew Bible

In The Formation of the Hebrew Bible David Carr rethinks both the methods and historical orientation points for research into the growth of the Hebrew Bible into its present form. Building on his prior work, Writing on the Tablet of the Heart (Oxford, 2005), he explores both the possibilities and limits of reconstruction of pre-stages of the Bible. The method he advocates is a ''methodologically modest'' investigation of those pre-stages, utilizing criteria and models derived from his survey of documented examples of textual revision in the Ancient Near East. The result is a new picture of the formation of the Hebrew Bible, with insights on the initial emergence of Hebrew literary textuality, the development of the first Hexateuch, and the final formation of the Hebrew Bible. Where some have advocated dating the bulk of the Hebrew Bible in a single period, whether relatively early (Neo-Assyrian) or late (Persian or Hellenistic), Carr uncovers specific evidence that the Hebrew Bible contains texts dating across Israelite history, even the early pre-exilic period (10th-9th centuries). He traces the impact of Neo-Assyrian imperialism on eighth and seventh century Israelite textuality. He uses studies of collective trauma to identify marks of the reshaping and collection of traditions in response to the destruction of Jerusalem and Babylonian exile. He develops a picture of varied Priestly reshaping of narrative and prophetic traditions in the Second Temple period, including the move toward eschatological and apocalyptic themes and genres. And he uses manuscript evidence from Qumran and the Septuagint to find clues to the final literary shaping of the proto-Masoretic text, likely under the Hasmonean monarchy.

Handbook on the Pentateuch

An Introduction to Source Analysis of the Pentateuch. Nashville: Abingdon. Mullen, E. Theodore, Jr. 1997. Ethnic Myths and Pentateuchal Foundations: A New Approach to the Formation of the Pentateuch. SemeiaSt. Atlanta: Scholars Press.

Handbook on the Pentateuch

In this introduction to the first five books of the Old Testament, Victor Hamilton moves chapter by chapter through the Pentateuch, examining the content, structure, and theology. Hamilton surveys each major thematic unit of the Pentateuch and offers useful commentary on overarching themes and connections between Old Testament texts.

The Old Testament

Within this period the books of the Pentateuch , and then the collection as a whole , came into being . Unfortunately it is extremely difficult to be precise in tracing the formation over this long period of time .

The Old Testament

This volume is an authoritative, easy-to-read introduction to the literature, history, and theology of the Old Testament. Sympathetic to all viewpoints, The Old Testament places at one’s fingertips a single source of comprehensive information, along with maps, charts, and illustrations carefully designed to deepen the beginning student’s understanding and insight.