The Foundations of Gentry Life

Peter Coss brings to life the day-to-day domestic life of the medieval gentry, from their obsession with display, to social codes of conduct and the treatment of guests.

The Foundations of Gentry Life

Peter Coss brings to life the day-to-day domestic life of the medieval gentry, from their obsession with display, to social codes of conduct and the treatment of guests. Drawing on the rich and rarely studied archive of the Multon family of Frampton, Coss provides an essential contribution to the study of 'gentry culture'.

Romance and the Gentry in Late Medieval England

The gentry, as Nigel Saul points out, “lived a life [. ... See also Peter Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and Their World, ...

Romance and the Gentry in Late Medieval England

Romance and the Gentry in Late Medieval England offers a new history of Middle English romance, the most popular genre of secular literature in the English Middle Ages. Michael Johnston argues that many of the romances composed in England from 1350-1500 arose in response to the specific socio-economic concerns of the gentry, the class of English landowners who lacked titles of nobility and hence occupied the lower rungs of the aristocracy. The end of the fourteenth century in England witnessed power devolving to the gentry, who became one of the dominant political and economic forces in provincial society. As Johnston demonstrates, this social change also affected England's literary culture, particularly the composition and readership of romance. Romance and the Gentry in Late Medieval England identifies a series of new topoi in Middle English that responded to the gentry's economic interests. But beyond social history and literary criticism, it also speaks to manuscript studies, showing that most of the codices of the "gentry romances" were produced by those in the immediate employ of the gentry. By bringing together literary criticism and manuscript studies, this book speaks to two scholarly communities often insulated from one another: it invites manuscript scholars to pay closer attention to the cultural resonances of the texts within medieval codices; simultaneously, it encourages literary scholars to be more attentive to the cultural resonances of surviving medieval codices.

A Social History of England 1500 1750

Coss, Foundations of Gentry Life, 4–5. A. Hassall Smith, County and Court: Government and Politics in Norfolk, 1558– 1603 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ...

A Social History of England  1500   1750

The rise of social history has had a transforming influence on the history of early modern England. It has broadened the historical agenda to include many previously little-studied, or wholly neglected, dimensions of the English past. It has also provided a fuller context for understanding more established themes in the political, religious, economic and intellectual histories of the period. This volume serves two main purposes. Firstly, it summarises, in an accessible way, the principal findings of forty years of research on English society in this period, providing a comprehensive overview of social and cultural change in an era vital to the development of English social identities. Second, the chapters, by leading experts, also stimulate fresh thinking by not only taking stock of current knowledge but also extending it, identifying problems, proposing fresh interpretations and pointing to unexplored possibilities. It will be essential reading for students, teachers and general readers.

Disciplined Dissent

For Richard de Grimhill and Digby 86 see Peter Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World, 1270-1370, Oxford, O.U.P., ...

Disciplined Dissent

Inspired by current debates around political confrontation and the exercise of power, Fabrizio Titone offers an interpretation based on the concept of disciplined dissent. This interpretation is centred on the notion of diffused power and is designed to transcend the binary distinction consensus/resistance. The aim is to identify the conservative process involved in mounting a critique, a protest, through which those who object may have intercepted and then deployed on their own account the cultural repertoire of those in a position of authority. This was with a view to obtaining a hearing, or even influencing the activities of the government and decentering the exercise of power. The essays collected here take as their theoretical point of departure the concept of disciplined dissent. In order to ascertain how adaptable the latter is, the decision was taken to include studies relating to wholly distinct political contexts. Contributions by scholars from different backgrounds shed light upon different circumstances prevailing in continental and non-continental medieval Europe. The aim is to offer a broad spectrum of analyses on political confrontation, the formulation of critiques and the attainment of spaces for participation by means of non-violent protest.

Games and Gaming in Medieval Literature

175–84, Peter Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World 1270–1370 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), pp.

Games and Gaming in Medieval Literature

The first-of-its-kind, Games and Gaming in Medieval Literature explores the depth and breadth of games in medieval literature and culture. Chapters span from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries, and cover England, France, Denmark, Poland, and Spain, re-examining medieval games in diverse social settings such as the church, court, and household.

Church Building and Society in the Later Middle Ages

37 E.g. Peter R. Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and Their World, 1270– 1370 (Oxford, 2010), Chapter 9; Eric Acheson, A Gentry ...

Church Building and Society in the Later Middle Ages

The construction of a church was undoubtedly one of the most demanding events to take place in the life of a medieval parish. It required a huge outlay of time, money and labour, and often a new organisational structure to oversee design and management. Who took control and who provided the financing was deeply shaped by local patterns in wealth, authority and institutional development - from small villages with little formal government to settlements with highly unequal populations. This all took place during a period of great economic and social change as communities managed the impact of the Black Death, the end of serfdom and the slump of the mid-fifteenth century. This original and authoritative study provides an account of how economic change, local politics and architecture combined in late-medieval England. It will be of interest to researchers of medieval, socio-economic and art history.

Marriage Household and Home in Modern Russia

44 endeavored to train their male students—mainly sons of lesser gentry, ... come to provide one of the foundations of provincial gentry life by the first ...

Marriage  Household and Home in Modern Russia

Barbara Alpern Engel's Marriage, Household and Home in Modern Russia is the first book to explore the intricacies of domestic life in Russia across the modern period. Surveying the period from 1700 right up to the present day, the book explores the marital and domestic arrangements of Russians at multiple levels of society and the impact of broader historical developments, including war and revolution, upon them. It also traces the evolution of marriage, household and home as institutions over three centuries, whilst also highlighting the inter-relationship between public policy and private life, in what is a wholly original historical assessment of domesticity in modern Russia. In the process, the author expertly synthesizes the key works, arguments and discussions in the field, mapping out the historiographical landscape of this compelling aspect of Russian social history. Marriage, Household and Home in Modern Russia is crucial reading for any student or scholar of modern Russian history.

Rural Society and Economic Change in County Durham

38–64 —— The Foundations of Gentry Life: the Multons of Frampton and their World, 1270–1370 (Oxford, 2010) —— Lordship, Knighthood and Locality: A Study in ...

Rural Society and Economic Change in County Durham

A regional study of landed society in the transition between the late medieval and early modern period.

Robert Thornton and His Books

77–9; Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life, pp. 209–29; and Youngs, Humphrey Newton, pp. 41–68, for informed discussions of the gentry's need for legal ...

Robert Thornton and His Books

Essays examining the compiler and contents of two of the most important and significant extant late medieval manuscript collections.

Historians on Chaucer

43 See Coss, Origins of the English Gentry, p. 194, together with works cited there. 44 For what follows see Peter Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The ...

Historians on Chaucer

As literary scholars have long insisted, an interdisciplinary approach is vital if modern readers are to make sense of works of medieval literature. In particular, rather than reading the works of medieval authors as addressing us across the centuries about some timeless or ahistorical 'human condition', critics from a wide range of theoretical approaches have in recent years shown how the work of poets such as Chaucer constituted engagements with the power relations and social inequalities of their time. Yet, perhaps surprisingly, medieval historians have played little part in this 'historical turn' in the study of medieval literature. The aim of this volume is to allow historians who are experts in the fields of economic, social, political, religious, and intellectual history the chance to interpret one of the most famous works of Middle English literature, Geoffrey Chaucer's 'General Prologue' to the Canterbury Tales, in its contemporary context. Rather than resorting to traditional historical attempts to see Chaucer's descriptions of the Canterbury pilgrims as immediate reflections of historical reality or as portraits of real life people whom Chaucer knew, the contributors to this volume have sought to show what interpretive frameworks were available to Chaucer in order to make sense of reality and how he adapted his literary and ideological inheritance so as to engage with the controversies and conflicts of his own day. Beginning with a survey of recent debates about the social meaning of Chaucer's work, the volume then discusses each of the Canterbury pilgrims in turn. Historians on Chaucer should be of interest to all scholars and students of medieval culture whether they are specialists in literature or history.

Kings Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain 1300 1625

19 There is no account of gentry education and literacy in the fourteenth ... The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World, ...

Kings  Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain  1300 1625

This book brings unusually brings together work on 15th century and the 16th century Scottish history, asking questions such as: How far can medieval themes such as OCylordshipOCO function in the late 16th-century world of Reformation and state formation? How"e;

The Household Knights of Edward III

The Origins of the English Gentry (Cambridge, 2003). ——, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World, 1270–1370 (Oxford, 2010).

The Household Knights of Edward III

First extended survey of the subject, looking at the knights' activities, roles, background and service.

Commemoration in Medieval Cambridge

English University Life in the Middle Ages (London, 1999). ... Coss, P., The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World 1270–1370 ...

Commemoration in Medieval Cambridge

An examination of how academic colleges commemorated their patrons in a rich variety of ways.

The Soldier in Later Medieval England

The Origins of the English Gentry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). ——, The Foundations of Gentry Life. The Multons of Frampton and their World ...

The Soldier in Later Medieval England

The Hundred Years War was a struggle for control over the French throne, fought as a series of conflicts between England, France, and their respective allies. The Soldier in Later Medieval England is the outcome of a project which collects the names of every soldier known to have served the English Crown from 1369 to the loss of Gascony in 1453, the event which is traditionally accepted as the end-date of the Hundred Years War. The data gathered throughout the project has allowed the authors of this volume to compare different forms of war, such as the chevauchées of the late fourteenth century and the occupation of French territories in the fifteenth century, and thus to identify longer-term trends. It also highlights the significance of the change of dynasty in England in the early 1400s. The scope of the volume begins in 1369 because of the survival from that point of the 'muster roll', a type of documentary record in which soldiers names are systematically recorded. The muster roll is a rich resource for the historian, as it allows closer study to be made of the peerage, the knights, the men-at-arms (the esquires), and especially the lower ranks of the army, such as the archers, who contributed the largest proportion of troops to English royal service. The Soldier in Later Medieval England seeks to investigate the different types of soldier, their regional and national origins, and movement between ranks. This is a wide-ranging volume, which offers invaluable insights into a much-neglected subject, and presents many opportunities for future research.

The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy

His experience suggested to him that a meaningful, free life was possible only ... It destroyed the economic foundations of gentry life but – in a futile ...

The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy

Best known for his great novels, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Tolstoy remains one the most important nineteenth-century writers; throughout his career which spanned nearly three quarters of a century, he wrote fiction, journalistic essays and educational textbooks. The specially commissioned essays in The Cambridge Companion to Tolstoy do justice to the sheer volume of Tolstoy's writing. Key dimensions of his writing and life are explored in essays focusing on his relationship to popular writing, the issue of gender and sexuality in his fiction and his aesthetics. The introduction provides a brief, unified account of the man, for whom his art was only one activity among many. The volume is well supported by supplementary material including a detailed guide to further reading and a chronology of Tolstoy's life, the most comprehensive compiled in English to date. Altogether the volume provides an invaluable resource for students and scholars alike.

The Hundred Years War

Coss, P. R., The Origins of the English Gentry (Cambridge, 2003). Coss, P. R., The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and their World ...

The Hundred Years War

What life was like for ordinary French and English people, embroiled in a devastating century-long conflict that changed their world The Hundred Years War (1337-1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peasants, soldiers, peacemakers, and kings. He also explores how the long war altered governance in England and France and reshaped peoples' perceptions of themselves and of their national character. Using the events of the war as a narrative thread, Green illuminates the realities of battle and the conditions of those compelled to live in occupied territory; the roles played by clergy and their shifting loyalties to king and pope; and the influence of the war on developing notions of government, literacy, and education. Peopled with vivid and well-known characters--Henry V, Joan of Arc, Philippe the Good of Burgundy, Edward the Black Prince, John the Blind of Bohemia, and many others--as well as a host of ordinary individuals who were drawn into the struggle, this absorbing book reveals for the first time not only the Hundred Years War's impact on warfare, institutions, and nations, but also its true human cost.

England and its Rulers

B.M.S. Campbell, English Seigniorial Agriculture 1250–1450 (2000). P. Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and Their World (2010).

England and its Rulers

This is an updated and expanded edition of a classic introduction to medieval England from the reign of William the Conqueror to Edward I. Includes a new chapter on family and gender roles, revisions throughout to enhance the narrative flow, and further reading sections containing the most up-to-date sources Offers engaging and clear discussion of the key political, economic, social, and cultural issues of the period, by an esteemed scholar and writer Illustrates themes with lively, pertinent examples and important primary sources Assesses the reigns of key Norman, Angevin, and Plantagenet monarchs, as well as the British dimension of English history, the creation of wealth, the rise of the aristocracy, and more

2010

The foundations of gentry life: the Multons of Frampton and their world, 1270–1370. New York, Oxford U. P., 2010, XII-323 p. (Past & present). 64.

2010

Every year, the Bibliography catalogues the most important new publications, historiographical monographs, and journal articles throughout the world, extending from prehistory and ancient history to the most recent contemporary historical studies. Within the systematic classification according to epoch, region, and historical discipline, works are also listed according to author’s name and characteristic keywords in their title.

Law and Society in Later Medieval England and Ireland

... 42–6; P. Coss, The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons of Frampton and Their World, 1270–1370 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 209–29.

Law and Society in Later Medieval England and Ireland

Law mattered in later medieval England and Ireland. A quick glance at the sources suggests as much. From the charter to the will to the court roll, the majority of the documents which have survived from later medieval England and Ireland, and medieval Europe in general, are legal in nature. Yet despite the fact that law played a prominent role in medieval society, legal history has long been a marginal subject within medieval studies both in Britain and North America. Much good work has been done in this field, but there is much still to do. This volume, a collection of essays in honour of Paul Brand, who has contributed perhaps more than any other historian to our understanding of the legal developments of later medieval England and Ireland, is intended to help fill this gap. The essays collected in this volume, which range from the twelfth to the sixteenth century, offer the latest research on a variety of topics within this field of inquiry. While some consider familiar topics, they do so from new angles, whether by exploring the underlying assumptions behind England’s adoption of trial by jury for crime or by assessing the financial aspects of the General Eyre, a core institution of jurisdiction in twelfth- and thirteenth-century England. Most, however, consider topics which have received little attention from scholars, from the significance of judges and lawyers smiling and laughing in the courtroom to the profits and perils of judicial office in English Ireland. The essays provide new insights into how the law developed and functioned within the legal profession and courtroom in late medieval England and Ireland, as well as how it pervaded the society at large.

Crisis and Survival in Late Medieval Ireland

The Foundations of Gentry Life: The Multons ofFrampton and their World, 1270–1370 (Oxford, 2010). Coward, Barry, The Stanleys, Lords Stanley and Earls of ...

Crisis and Survival in Late Medieval Ireland

This volume explores the ways in which the English settlers in Louth maintained their English identity in the face of plague and warfare, through the turbulent decades between 1330 and 1450.