The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars is one of the earliest examples of a military science manual, detailing arms technology, tactical maneuvers, battlefield politics, espionage, intelligence and even the role played by luck in ground and sea campaigns.

The Gallic Wars


The Gallic War

The only chronicle by an ancient general of his own campaigns, this eloquent history offers priceless details about Gaul, Germany, and Britain during the 1st century B.C. Includes 6 maps, 7 figures.

The Gallic War

The only chronicle by an ancient general of his own campaigns, this eloquent history offers priceless details about Gaul, Germany, and Britain during the 1st century B.C. Includes 6 maps, 7 figures.

The Gallic War translated by W A Macdevitte with an Introduction by Thomas de Quincey

"The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic tribes, Galli being the Latin equivalent of Celt.

The Gallic War   translated by W  A  Macdevitte with an Introduction by Thomas de Quincey

"The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic tribes, Galli being the Latin equivalent of Celt. These tribes, along with many others, made up the confederation of tribes that was the Celtic nation, or the Celtic Tribe of Tribes. Rome's war against the Gallic tribes lasted from 58 BC to 50 BC and culminated in the decisive Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, in which a complete Roman victory resulted in the expansion of the Roman Republic over the whole of Gaul (mainly present day France and Belgium). The wars paved the way for Julius Caesar to become the sole ruler of the Roman Republic."--Wikipedia.

The Conquest of Gaul

Between 58 and 50BC Caesar conquered most of the area now covered by France, Belgium and Switzerland, and twice invaded Britain. This is the record of his campaigns.

The Conquest of Gaul

Between 58 and 50BC Caesar conquered most of the area now covered by France, Belgium and Switzerland, and twice invaded Britain. This is the record of his campaigns. Caesar's narrative offers insights into his military strategy & paints a fascinating picture of his encounters with the inhabitant of Gaul and Britain, as well as offering lively portraits of a number of key characters such as the rebel leaders and Gallic chieftains. This can also be read as a piece of political propaganda, as Caesar sets down his version of events for the Roman public, knowing that he faces civil war on his return to Rome.

Caesar s Gallic Wars

Kate Gilliver makes use of this account and other surviving evidence to consider the importance of the Gallic Wars in the context of the collapse of the Roman Republic and its slide toward civil war.

Caesar s Gallic Wars

Julius Caesar was one of the most ambitious and successful politicians of the late Roman Republic and his short but bloody conquest of the Celtic tribes led to the establishment of the Roman province of Gaul (modern France). Caesar's commentaries on his Gallic Wars provide us with the most detailed surviving eye-witness account of a campaign from antiquity. Kate Gilliver makes use of this account and other surviving evidence to consider the importance of the Gallic Wars in the context of the collapse of the Roman Republic and its slide toward civil war.

The War for Gaul

Complete with a chronology, a map of Gaul, suggestions for further reading, and an index, this feature-rich edition captures the forceful austerity of a troubling yet magnificent classic—a book that, as O’Donnell says, “gets war ...

The War for Gaul

A new translation that captures the gripping power of one of the greatest war stories ever told—Julius Caesar’s pitiless account of his brutal campaign to conquer Gaul Imagine a book about an unnecessary war written by the ruthless general of an occupying army—a vivid and dramatic propaganda piece that forces the reader to identify with the conquerors and that is designed, like the war itself, to fuel the limitless political ambitions of the author. Could such a campaign autobiography ever be a great work of literature—perhaps even one of the greatest? It would be easy to think not, but such a book exists—and it helped transform Julius Caesar from a politician on the make into the Caesar of legend. This remarkable new translation of Caesar’s famous but underappreciated War for Gaul captures, like never before in English, the gripping and powerfully concise style of the future emperor’s dispatches from the front lines in what are today France, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. While letting Caesar tell his battle stories in his own way, distinguished classicist James O’Donnell also fills in the rest of the story in a substantial introduction and notes that together explain why Gaul is the “best bad man’s book ever written”—a great book in which a genuinely bad person offers a bald-faced, amoral description of just how bad he has been. Complete with a chronology, a map of Gaul, suggestions for further reading, and an index, this feature-rich edition captures the forceful austerity of a troubling yet magnificent classic—a book that, as O’Donnell says, “gets war exactly right and morals exactly wrong.”

The Gallic War

This new translation reflects the purity of Caesar's Latin while preserving the pace and flow of his momentous narrative. As well as an introduction and notes, this edition offers maps, a table of dates, and a glossary.

The Gallic War

The Gallic War, published on the eve of the civil war which led to the end of the Roman Republic, is an autobiographical account written by one of the most famous figures of European history. This new translation reflects the purity of Caesar's Latin while preserving the pace and flow of his momentous narrative. As well as an introduction and notes, this edition offers maps, a table of dates, and a glossary.

The Gallic Wars Latin and English

The Commentaries of Caesar on the Gallic War, Books 1-8Presented in a new format featuring both Latin and English, with new vocablulary presented in line as it's encountered.

The Gallic Wars  Latin and English

The Commentaries of Caesar on the Gallic War, Books 1-8Presented in a new format featuring both Latin and English, with new vocablulary presented in line as it's encountered. Each Latin paragraph is displayed with its English translation on the facing page, making this an easy and enjoyable read for students and enthusiasts alike.Read the chronicle of Rome's military campaigns resulting in the permanent conquest of Gaul, written by the hand of the conqueror himself. In 58 BC, Julius Caesar set his armies against Rome's perennial enemies and at last achieved a victory that resulted in the expansion of the empire over the whole of modern day France. At the expidition's conclusion, he set the story down in this epic, which continues to delight readers into the modern age.

Caesar s Conquest of Gaul

This updated edition contains the translated text and various illustrations depicting Roman warfare and key moments in Caesar's journey.

Caesar s Conquest of Gaul

The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic tribes. They lasted from 58 BC to 50 BC and culminated in the decisive Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, in which a complete Roman victory resulted in the expansion of the Roman Republic over the whole of Gaul. The wars paved the way for Julius Caesar to become the sole ruler of the Roman Republic.??Although Caesar portrayed this invasion as being a preemptive and defensive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Still, Gaul was of significant military importance to the Romans, as these had been attacked several times by native tribes both indigenous to Gaul and further to the north. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine.??The Gallic Wars are described by Julius Caesar as himself in this book, which was originally titled Commentarii de Bello Gallico, it is a pertinent and only slightly tendentious and altogether the most important historical source regarding the conflict. This updated edition contains the translated text and various illustrations depicting Roman warfare and key moments in Caesar's journey.

The Gallic Wars

Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. -- Amazon

The Gallic Wars

Caesar portrayed his invasion of Gaul as being a defensive pre-emptive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Even so, Gaul was extremely important to Rome, as they had been attacked many times by the Gauls. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. -- Amazon

The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars, "De Bello Gallico" by Caius Julius Caesar. Commentaries on the Gallic War, also Bellum Gallicum, English: Gallic War, is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative.

The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars, "De Bello Gallico" by Caius Julius Caesar. Commentaries on the Gallic War, also Bellum Gallicum, English: Gallic War, is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative. In it Caesar describes the battles and intrigues that took place in the nine years he spent fighting the Germanic peoples and Celtic peoples in Gaul that opposed Roman conquest. The "Gaul" that Caesar refers to is ambiguous, as the term had various connotations in Roman writing and discourse during Caesar's time. Generally, Gaul included all of the regions that Romans had not conquered or administered or which were primarily inhabited by Celts; except for the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (modern-day Provence and Languedoc-Roussillon), which had already been conquered in Caesar's time, therefore encompassing the rest of modern France, Belgium, Western Germany, and parts of Switzerland. As the Roman Republic made inroads deeper into Celtic territory and conquered more land, the definition of "Gaul" shifted. Concurrently, "Gaul" was also used in common parlance as a synonym for "uncouth" or "unsophisticated" as Romans saw Celtic peoples as uncivilized compared with Rome. The character of the First Caesar has perhaps never been worse appreciated than by him who in one sense described it best; that is, with most force and eloquence wherever he really did comprehend it. This was Lucan, who has nowhere exhibited more brilliant rhetoric, nor wandered more from the truth, than in the contrasted portraits of Caesar and Pompey. The famous line, "Nil actum reputans si quid superesset agendum," is a fine feature of the real character, finely expressed. But, if it had been Lucan's purpose (as possibly, with a view to Pompey's benefit, in some respects it was) utterly and extravagantly to falsify the character of the great Dictator, by no single trait could he more effectually have fulfilled that purpose, nor in fewer words, than by this expressive passage, "Gaudensque viam fecisse ruina." Such a trait would be almost extravagant applied even to Marius, who (though in many respects a perfect model of Roman grandeur, massy, columnar, imperturbable, and more perhaps than any one man recorded in History capable of justifying the bold illustration of that character in Horace, "Si fractus illabatur orbis, impavidum ferient ruinae") had, however, a ferocity in his character, and a touch of the devil in him, very rarely united with the same tranquil intrepidity. But, for Caesar, the all-accomplished statesman, the splendid orator, the man of elegant habits and polished taste, the patron of the fine arts in a degree transcending all example of his own or the previous age, and as a man of general literature so much beyond his contemporaries, except Cicero, that he looked down even upon the brilliant Sylla as an illiterate person-to class such a man with the race of furious destroyers exulting in the desolations they spread is to err not by an individual trait, but by the whole genus.

Commentaries on the Gallic Wars

The Commentaries on the Gallic Wars (or, in Latin, "Commentarii de Bello Galli") is an account of Julius Caesar on the Gallic Campaigns in the West.

Commentaries on the Gallic Wars

The Commentaries on the Gallic Wars (or, in Latin, "Commentarii de Bello Galli") is an account of Julius Caesar on the Gallic Campaigns in the West.

The Gallic Wars

" - Caesar, De Bello Gallico The Gallic Wars, the series of campaigns waged by Julius Caesar on behalf of the Roman Senate between 58-50 BC, were among the defining conflicts of the Roman era.

The Gallic Wars

*Includes pictures. *Includes excerpts from Caesar's own commentaries about the Gallic Wars. *Includes a bibliography for further reading. "As the action was carried on in sight of all, neither a brave nor cowardly act could be concealed; both the desire of praise and the fear of ignominy, urged on each party to valor. After fighting from noon almost to sunset, without victory inclining in favor of either, the Germans, on one side, made a charge against the enemy in a compact body, and drove them back; and, when they were put to flight, the archers were surrounded and cut to pieces. In other parts, likewise, our men pursued to the camp the retreating enemy, and did not give them an opportunity of rallying..." - Caesar, De Bello Gallico The Gallic Wars, the series of campaigns waged by Julius Caesar on behalf of the Roman Senate between 58-50 BC, were among the defining conflicts of the Roman era. Not only was the expansion of the Republic's domains unprecedented (especially when considering it was undertaken under the auspices of a single general), it had a profound cultural impact on Rome itself as well. The Roman Republic, so dynamic in the wake of the destruction of their ancient enemy, Carthage, had recently suffered a series of dramatic upheavals; from the great slave rebellion of Spartacus to the brutal and bloody struggle for power of Marius and Sulla. Rome had been shaken to its very core, and a victory was essential both to replenish the dwindling national coffers and to instill in the people a sense of civic pride and a certainty in the supremacy of the Republic. Quite simply, in terms of scale, the Gallic Wars were unmatched by anything the Roman Republic had witnessed since the Punic Wars. By the end of the campaigns, ancient historians estimated that more than a million people had died, and still more displaced or enslaved. Even by the more conservative estimates of modern historians, a casualty count in the hundreds of thousands appears possible. Either way, the war was a cataclysm, involving tens of thousands of combatants, and it also marked the greatest displays of skill by one of the greatest battlefield generals history has ever known. Caesar's successful campaigns in Gaul have become the stuff of military legend, in part because he had the foresight to document them himself. Caesar himself wrote a famous firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, apparently from notes he had kept during the campaigns, and he wrote Commentarii de Bello Gallico (Commentaries on the Gallic War) in the third person. Caesar's account described the campaigning and the battles, all as part of a propaganda campaign to win the popularity of the Roman people. As a result, he left out inconvenient facts, including how much of a fortune he made plundering, but the work still remains popular today, and it is still used to teach Latin. The Gallic Wars: The Campaigns That Made Julius Caesar a Roman Legend comprehensively looks at the campaigns that subdued Gaul and led to Caesar's conquest not just of the European continent but of Rome itself. Along with pictures, you will learn about the Gallic Wars like never before, in no time at all.

The Gallic Wars and the Civil War

Nothing more and nothing less than the personal diary of the most distinguished Roman general of all time, Gaius Julius Caesar.

The Gallic Wars and the Civil War

Nothing more and nothing less than the personal diary of the most distinguished Roman general of all time, Gaius Julius Caesar. Throughout his comments, written in the first person (and supposedly by himself, although some say not), Julius Caesar describes the two most important wars of his time: the war in Gaul and the civil war that confronted him. Pompey in one of the most brutal massacres between Romans. Caesar takes us from the beginning of the Gallic War to his victory over Pompey, going through key moments in the history of Rome, such as the defeat of Vercingetorix or the famous crossing of the Rubicon that marked the beginning of the civil war. A true masterpiece that no one should miss. Highly recommended.

The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic tribes.

The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic tribes. Rome's war against the Gallic tribes lasted from 58 BC to 50 BC and culminated in the decisive Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, in which a complete Roman victory resulted in the expansion of the Roman Republic over the whole of Gaul (mainly present-day France and Belgium). While militarily just as strong as the Romans, the internal division between the Gallic tribes helped ease victory for Caesar, and Vercingetorix's attempt to unite the Gauls against Roman invasion came too late. The wars paved the way for Julius Caesar to become the sole ruler of the Roman Republic.Although Caesar portrayed this invasion as being a preemptive and defensive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Still, Gaul was of significant military importance to the Romans, as they had been attacked several times by native tribes both indigenous to Gaul and farther to the north. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. The Gallic Wars are described by Julius Caesar in his book Commentarii de Bello Gallico, which remains the most important historical source regarding the conflict.

Conquest

Roman history graphic novel, the first in English to tell the story of Julius Caesar's conquest of Gaul from 49 B.C. to 52 B.C. in comic book form.

Conquest


Strategy Six Pack

Strategy Six Pack brings together six essential texts for military theorists: Machiavelli's The Prince The Art of War by Sun Tzu Battle Studies by Ardant du Picq Einhard's Life of Charlemagne Julius Caesar's The Gallic Wars On War by Carl ...

Strategy Six Pack

""War is merely the continuation of politics by other means."" - Clausewitz. Strategy Six Pack brings together six essential texts for military theorists: Machiavelli's The Prince The Art of War by Sun Tzu Battle Studies by Ardant du Picq Einhard's Life of Charlemagne Julius Caesar's The Gallic Wars On War by Carl von Clausewitz Each work has been newly revised and expertly edited with notes, images and a table of contents. Centuries of tactical wisdom distilled. Military Science has never been more thoroughly represented in one single volume. ""The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting."" - Sun Tzu.

The Gallic Wars by Julius Caesar

Beyond its importance as a source document for military and Roman history, Caesar's clean prose style has long made his Gallic Wars the text of choice for second-year Latin.

The Gallic Wars by Julius Caesar

Beyond its importance as a source document for military and Roman history, Caesar's clean prose style has long made his Gallic Wars the text of choice for second-year Latin. It is also of interest because of his first-hand observations of the Celtic tribes that he was waging war on. For instance, Book 6 contains a long passage about Gaulish society, the Druids, and his famous description of the original burning man ritual. Gaius Julius Caesar (13 July 100 BC - 15 March 44 BC), usually called Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. He is also known as a notable author of Latin prose.

Caesar s Commentaries

This complete edition of Caesar's Commentaries contains all eight of Caesar's books on the Gallic War as well as all three of his books on the Civil War masterfully translated into English by W. A. MacDevitt.

Caesar s Commentaries

This complete edition of Caesar's Commentaries contains all eight of Caesar's books on the Gallic War as well as all three of his books on the Civil War masterfully translated into English by W. A. MacDevitt. Caesar's Commentaries are an outstanding account of extraordinary events by one of the most exceptional men in the history of the world. Julius Caesar himself was one of the most eminent writers of the age in which he lived. His commentaries on the Gallic and Civil Wars are written with a purity, precision, and perspicuity, which command approbation. They are elegant without affectation, and beautiful without ornament. Of the two books which he composed on Analogy, and those under the title of Anti-Cato, scarcely any fragment is preserved; but we may be assured of the justness of the observations on language, which were made by an author so much distinguished by the excellence of his own compositions. His poem entitled The Journey, which was probably an entertaining narrative, is likewise totally lost. All of Caesar's works that remain intact are contained in this edition of his commentaries. It is to the honor of Caesar, that when he had obtained the supreme power, he exercised it with a degree of moderation beyond what was generally expected by those who had fought on the side of the Republic. His time was almost entirely occupied with public affairs, in the management of which, though he employed many agents, he appears to have had none in the character of actual minister. Caesar deprecated a lingering death, and wished that his own might be sudden and speedy. And the day before he died, the conversation at supper, in the house of Marcus Lepidus, turning upon what wasthe most eligible way of dying, he gave his opinion in favor of a death that is sudden and unexpected. He died in the fifty-sixth year of his age, and was ranked amongst the Gods.