The Geographic Imagination of Modernity

This book is a study of the emergence of the geographic paradigm in modern Western thought around 1800.

The Geographic Imagination of Modernity

This book is a study of the emergence of the geographic paradigm in modern Western thought around 1800.

Geographical Imagination and the Authority of Images

Embedded in these are theoretical and ethical reflections on the ways that we come to know the world, ourselves and each other through geographical engagements, especially when these are mediated through graphic images.

Geographical Imagination and the Authority of Images

Geographical imagination and the authority of images collects three papers and an interview on the themes presented and discussed during the 2005 Hettner lectures. Cosgrove examines the roles that vision and imagination have played in shaping material and represented landscapes at scales ranging from the local and regional to the global and cosmic. The book presents substantive studies of cosmographic and global mapping, the picturesque tradition and suburban Los Angeles, and the use of aeTranspennine' England as a geographical art gallery. Embedded in these are theoretical and ethical reflections on the ways that we come to know the world, ourselves and each other through geographical engagements, especially when these are mediated through graphic images. The interview locates these themes within the context of Denis Cosgrove's development as a geographer and his response to debates within the discipline about the roles of imagination, culture and representation within geographies's humanities tradition. Contents Peter Meusburger / Hans Gebhardt: Introduction: Hettner-Lecture 2005 in Heidelberg Denis Cosgrove: Apollo's eye: a cultural geography of the globe Denis Cosgrove: Landscape, culture and modernity Denis Cosgrove: Regional art: Transpennine geography remembered and exhibited Tim Freytag / Heike Joens: Vision and the ,culturalae in geography: a biographical interview with Denis Cosgrove The Klaus Tschira Foundations gGmbH u Photographic representations: Hettner-Lecture 2005 u List of participants.

Europe and the British Geographical Imagination 1760 1830

Stock, Paul, 'America and the American Revolution in British Geographical Thought, c.1760–1830, ... Tang, Chenxi, The Geographical Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism (Stanford, ...

Europe and the British Geographical Imagination  1760 1830

Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830 explores what literate British people understood by the word 'Europe' in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Was Europe unified by shared religious heritage? Where were the edges of Europe? Was Europe primarily a commercial network or were there common political practices too? Was Britain itself a European country? While intellectual history is concerned predominantly with prominent thinkers, Paul Stock traces the history of ideas in non-elite contexts, offering a detailed analysis of nearly 350 geographical reference works, textbooks, dictionaries, and encyclopaedias, which were widely read by literate Britons of all classes, and can reveal the formative ideas about Europe circulating in Britain: ideas about religion; the natural environment; race and other theories of human difference; the state; borders; the identification of the 'centre' and 'edges' of Europe; commerce and empire; and ideas about the past, progress, and historical change. By showing how these and other questions were discussed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British culture, Europe and the British Geographical Imagination, 1760-1830 provides a thorough and much-needed historical analysis of Britain's enduringly complex intellectual relationship with Europe.

Moving Through Modernity

The first full-length account of modernism from the perspective of literary geography.

Moving Through Modernity

The first full-length account of modernism from the perspective of literary geography.

Imagining World Order

As legal history, the book approaches the development of international law in this period—its so-called classical age—in terms of literary imagination.

Imagining World Order

In early modern Europe, international law emerged as a means of governing relations between rapidly consolidating sovereign states, purporting to establish a normative order for the perilous international world. However, it was intrinsically fragile and uncertain, for sovereign states had no acknowledged common authority that would create, change, apply, and enforce legal norms. In Imagining World Order, Chenxi Tang shows that international world order was as much a literary as a legal matter. To begin with, the poetic imagination contributed to the making of international law. As the discourse of international law coalesced, literary works from romances and tragedies to novels responded to its unfulfilled ambitions and inexorable failures, occasionally affirming it, often contesting it, always uncovering its problems and rehearsing imaginary solutions. Tang highlights the various modes in which literary texts—some highly canonical (Camões, Shakespeare, Corneille, Lohenstein, and Defoe, among many others), some largely forgotten yet worth rediscovering—engaged with legal thinking in the period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. In tracing such engagements, he offers a dual history of international law and European literature. As legal history, the book approaches the development of international law in this period—its so-called classical age—in terms of literary imagination. As literary history, Tang recounts how literature confronted the question of international world order and how, in the process, a set of literary forms common to major European languages (epic, tragedy, romance, novel) evolved.

Translating the World

... The Geographic Imagination of Modernity, Chenxi Tang suggests a threshold moment in human imagination. By working through the coemergence of geographic sciences and “the making of the modern semantics of geographic space,”23 Tang ...

Translating the World

In Translating the World, Birgit Tautz provides a new narrative of German literary history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Departing from dominant modes of thought regarding the nexus of literary and national imagination, she examines this intersection through the lens of Germany’s emerging global networks and how they were rendered in two very different German cities: Hamburg and Weimar. German literary history has tended to employ a conceptual framework that emphasizes the nation or idealized citizenry; yet the experiences of readers in eighteenth-century German cities existed within the context of their local environments, in which daily life occurred and writers such as Lessing, Schiller, and Goethe worked. Hamburg, a flourishing literary city in the late eighteenth century, was eventually relegated to the margins of German historiography, while Weimar, then a small town with an insular worldview, would become mythologized for not only its literary history but its centrality in national German culture. By interrogating the histories of and texts associated with these cities, Tautz shows how literary styles and genres are born of local, rather than national, interaction with the world. Her examination of how texts intersect and interact reveals how they shape and transform the urban cultural landscape as they are translated and move throughout the world. A fresh, elegant exploration of literary translation, discursive shifts, and global cultural changes, Translating the World is an exciting new story of eighteenth-century German culture and its relationship to expanding global networks that will especially interest scholars of comparative literature, German studies, and literary history.

Out of Place

German Realism, Displacement and Modernity John B. Lyon ... Chenxi Tang's significant study, The Geographic Imagination of Modernity, argues for the emergence of “a distinctively modern concept of geography alongside and in ...

Out of Place

In late nineteenth-century Germany, the onset of modernity transformed how people experienced place. In response to increased industrialization and urbanization, the expansion of international capitalism, and the extension of railway and other travel networks, the sense of being connected to a specific place gave way to an unsettling sense of displacement. Out of Place analyzes the works of three major representatives of German Realism-Wilhelm Raabe, Theodor Fontane, and Gottfried Keller-within this historical context. It situates the perceived loss of place evident in their texts within the contemporary discourse of housing and urban reform, but also views such discourse through the lens of twentienth-century theories of place. Informed by both phenomenological (Heidegger and Casey) as well as Marxist (Deleuze, Guattari, and Benjamin) approaches to place, John B. Lyon highlights the struggle to address issues of place and space that reappear today in debates about environmentalism, transnationalism, globalization, and regionalism.

Reframing Dutch Culture

It does no justice to the mixed experiences of modernity and Islam in specific geographical settings, which are located in the 'West' as well as in the 'East'. The geographical imagination of modernity and tradition has immense ...

Reframing Dutch Culture

Dutch society has undergone radical changes in recent years, due to complex political, social and ethnic developments. Reframing Dutch Culture examines issues of nationality, ethnicity, culture and identity in The Netherlands from an ethnological perspective, linking past traditions and notions of identity with more recent transformations. Weaving in a range of fascinating case studies, contributors provide an interdisciplinary analysis of these changes. The developments are related to wider European and global transformation processes, highlighting the contribution of Dutch ethnology to the international debate. This timely collection provides a fascinating and insightful window on modern Dutch society.

The Fabric of Space

In this book, Matthew Gandy considers the cultural and material significance of water through the experiences of six cities: Paris, Berlin, Lagos, Mumbai, Los Angeles, and London.

The Fabric of Space

A study of water at the intersection of landscape and infrastructure in Paris, Berlin, Lagos, Mumbai, Los Angeles, and London. Water lies at the intersection of landscape and infrastructure, crossing between visible and invisible domains of urban space, in the tanks and buckets of the global South and the vast subterranean technological networks of the global North. In this book, Matthew Gandy considers the cultural and material significance of water through the experiences of six cities: Paris, Berlin, Lagos, Mumbai, Los Angeles, and London. Tracing the evolving relationships among modernity, nature, and the urban imagination, from different vantage points and through different periods, Gandy uses water as a lens through which to observe both the ambiguities and the limits of nature as conventionally understood. Gandy begins with the Parisian sewers of the nineteenth century, captured in the photographs of Nadar, and the reconstruction of subterranean Paris. He moves on to Weimar-era Berlin and its protection of public access to lakes for swimming, the culmination of efforts to reconnect the city with nature. He considers the threat of malaria in Lagos, where changing geopolitical circumstances led to large-scale swamp drainage in the 1940s. He shows how the dysfunctional water infrastructure of Mumbai offers a vivid expression of persistent social inequality in a postcolonial city. He explores the incongruous concrete landscapes of the Los Angeles River. Finally, Gandy uses the fictional scenario of a partially submerged London as the starting point for an investigation of the actual hydrological threats facing that city.

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Human Geography

... see Anne Godlewska, Geography Unbound: French Geographic Science from Cassini to Humboldt (Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1999) and Chenxi Tang, The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature and Philosophy in ...

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Human Geography

This volume provides an up-to-date, authoritative synthesis of the discipline of human geography. Unparalleled in scope, the companion offers an indispensable overview to the field, representing both historical and contemporary perspectives. Edited and written by the world's leading authorities in the discipline Divided into three major sections: Foundations (the history of human geography from Ancient Greece to the late nineteenth century); The Classics (the roots of modern human geography); Contemporary Approaches (current issues and themes in human geography) Each contemporary issue is examined by two contributors offering distinctive perspectives on the same theme

Reading Kant s Geography

See also Chenxi Tang, The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticisim (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2008), 98–123. 11. Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics, 65; see Wilson, ...

Reading Kant s Geography

Perspectives on Kant's teachings on geography and how they relate his understanding of the world.

The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism

22 Chenxi Tang, The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008), 1. 23 Richard Hartshorne, 'The Nature of Geography: A Critical ...

The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism

The Oxford Handbook of European Romanticism focuses on the period beginning with the French Revolution and extending to the uprisings of 1848 across Europe. It brings together leading scholars in the field to examine the intellectual, literary, philosophical, and political elements of European Romanticism. The volume begins with a series of chapters examining key texts written by major writers in languages including French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Hungarian, Greek, and Polish amongst others. Then follows a second section based on the naturally inter-disciplinary quality of Romanticism, encapsulated by the different discourses with which writers of the time, set up an internal comparative dynamic. These chapters highlight the sense a discourse gives of being written knowledgeably against other pretenders to completeness or comprehensiveness of understanding, and the Enlightenment encyclopaedic project. Discourses typically push their individual claims to resume European culture, collaborating and trying to assimilate each other in the process. The main examples featuring here are history, geography, drama, theology, language, geography, philosophy, political theory, the sciences, and the media. Each chapter offers original and individual interpretation of individual aspects of an inherently comparative world of individual writers and the discursive idioms to which they are historically subject. Together the forty-one chapters provide a comprehensive and unique overview of European Romanticism.

Even in Sweden

"A tour de force"—Orvar Löfgren, co-author of Culture Builders: A Historical Anthropology of Middle Class Life "Written in a striking, experimental style, this is an insightful and impressive book on a topic of enormous contemporary ...

Even in Sweden

"A tour de force"—Orvar Löfgren, co-author of Culture Builders: A Historical Anthropology of Middle Class Life "Written in a striking, experimental style, this is an insightful and impressive book on a topic of enormous contemporary significance."—James Ferguson, author of Expectations of Modernity "Pred works with a powerful set of ideas and arresting empirical materials to create a series of interlocking, overlapping, and superimposed spaces within which modern racism is brought into view with a shocking clarity. "—Derek Gregory, author of Geographical Imaginations

The Restorative Poetics of a Geological Age

Cf. Chenxi Tang, The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism (Stanford UP, 2008), 203; for the entire discussion of historism/historicism, 202–239. “Eine vornehmlich im 19.

The Restorative Poetics of a Geological Age

Geohistoricism examines two mid-nineteenth century thinkers – the Austrian writer Adalbert Stifter and the French architect Eugène E. Viollet-le-Duc – who imagined cultural history on the model of earth history: as a history of objects to be restored and worlds to be reconstructed. The nascent field of geology shaped cultural thought; their conservationism, informed by erosion, envisions a future of restorative renewal.

Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective

The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2008. Timmermann, Carsten. “Not Moribund at All! An Historian of Medicine's Response to ...

Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective

Bringing together incisive contributions from an international group of colleagues and former students, Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective takes stock of the field of German history as exemplified by the extraordinary scholarly career of Konrad H. Jarausch. Through fascinating reflections on the discipline’s theoretical, professional, and methodological dimensions, it explores Jarausch’s monumental work as a teacher and a builder of scholarly institutions. In this way, it provides not merely a look back at the last fifty years of German history, but a path forward as new ideas and methods infuse the study of Germany’s past.

Geographies of British Modernity

late twentiethcentury British modernity: internet cafes, shiny call centres, expanded universities and science parks failed to capture the imagination in the same way as the power stations, mines and ships of an earlier time.

Geographies of British Modernity

This volume brings together leading scholars in the geography and history of twentieth-century Britain to illustrate the contribution that geographical thinking can make to understanding modern Britain. The first collection to explore the contribution that geographical thinking can make to our understanding of modern Britain. Contains thirteen essays by leading scholars in the geography and history of twentieth-century Britain. Focuses on how and why geographies of Britain have formed and changed over the past century. Combines economic, political, social and cultural geographies. Demonstrates the vitality of work in this field and its relevance to everyday life.

Constructing Leisure

Tang, C. (2008) The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, Literature, and Philosophy in German Romanticism (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press). Thomas, K. (2003) Religion and the Decline of Magic (Harmondsworth: Penguin).

Constructing Leisure

This book looks back at the meaning and purpose of leisure in the past. But this is not a simple social history of leisure. It is not enough to write a history of leisure on its own in fact, it is impossible without engaging in the debate about what counts as leisure (in the present and in the past). Writing a history of leisure, then, entails writing a philosophy of leisure: and any history needs to be a philosophical history as well. That is the purpose of this book. It provides an account of leisure through historical time, how leisure was constructed and understood by historical actors, how communicative reason and free will interacted with instrumentality at different times, how historians have reconstructed past leisure through historiography, and finally, how writers have perceived the meaning and purpose of leisure in alternative histories. Providing a sweeping overview of the field, Karl Spracklen charts how the concept of leisure was understood in Ancient history, through to modern times, and looks at leisure in different societies and cultures including Byzantium and Asian civilizations, as well as looking at leisure and Islam. Spracklen concludes with a chapter on future histories of leisure.

Alexander von Humboldt s Translantic Personae

Tang Chenxi, Geographic Imagination of Modernity, 100. 60. Beck, Alexander von Humboldt, 60Á1. Citing Beck, among others, Tang Chenxi notes that Kant's ideas concerning geography influenced Humboldt (Geographic Imagination of Modernity, ...

Alexander von Humboldt s Translantic Personae

Who was Alexander von Humboldt? Was he really a lone genius? Was he another European apologist for colonialism in the Americas or the father of Latin American independence? Was he a roving Romanticist, or did his sensibilities belong to the Enlightenment? Naturalist, philosopher, historian, and proto-sociologist--to name just some of the fields to which he contributed--, Humboldt is impossible to contain in a single identity or definition. His voluminous writings range across so many different fields of knowledge that his scholarly-scientific personae multiplied even during his lifetime, and they have continued to proliferate since his death in 1859. A household word throughout the nineteenth century, Humboldt was eventually eclipsed by Charles Darwin (whose own travels had been motivated by Humboldt’s) and disappeared from view for much of the twentieth century, notably in the United States. The essays in this collection testify to the renewed interest that Alexander von Humboldt’s multi-faceted work is inspiring in the twenty-first century, especially among cultural and literary historians from both sides of the Atlantic. This book was originally published as a special issue of Atlantic Studies.

Sensationalism and the Genealogy of Modernity

This book maps out the temporal and geographic coordinates of the trope of sensationalism in the long nineteenth century through a comparative approach.

Sensationalism and the Genealogy of Modernity

This book maps out the temporal and geographic coordinates of the trope of sensationalism in the long nineteenth century through a comparative approach. Not only juxtaposing different geographical areas (Europe, Asia and Oceania), this volume also disperses its history over a longue durée, allowing readers to perceive the hidden and often unacknowledged continuities throughout a period that is often reduced to the confines of the national disciplines of literature, art, and cultural studies. Providing a wide range of methodological approaches from the fields of literary studies, art history, sociology of literature, and visual culture, this collection offers indispensable examples of the relation between literature and several other media. Topics include the rhetorical tropes of popular culture, the material culture of clothing, the lived experience of performance as a sub-text of literature and painting, and the redefinition of spatiality and temporality in theory, art, and literature.