The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers

This new edition, with facing-page English translation of the Latin text, provides the first complete English translation, as well as a full historical introduction and detailed notes.

The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers

William of Poitiers served William the Conqueror for many years as one of his chaplains. His Gesta Guillelmi is a first-hand account of the momentous events of William's reign, and one of the most important sources for the history of the period. This new edition, with facing-page English translation of the Latin text, provides the first complete English translation, as well as a full historical introduction and detailed notes.

Proceedings of the Battle Conference on Anglo Norman Studies

31 In my lecture I drew attention to a phenomenon which confirms Barlow's conclusion : there is a sort of dialogue between the Carmen and the Gesta Guillelmi , perceptible in what seem to be reactions of William of Poitiers to passages ...

Proceedings of the Battle Conference on Anglo Norman Studies

Carmen de Hastingae Proelio; Battle c.1100; Military architecture; Piety of Anglo-Norman Knightly Class; Military Architecture c.1200; The Byzantine View of the Normans; Henry I and Anglo-Norman Magnates; Anglo-Norman as a Spoken Language; Magnates, Curiales and the Wheel of Fortune; Bishop's Lynn; Battle Abbey. Contributors: C. CLARK, P.E. CURNOW, R.H.C. DAVIS, L.J. ENGELS, C. HARPER-BILL, J. HERMANS, C.W. HOLLISTER, M.D. LEGGE, D.M. OWEN, E.M. SEARLE.

The House of Godwine

The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers , pp . 130–33 . For a range of interpretations of the key stages of the battle , see Essays 12–18 in Morillo ( ed . ) , The Battle of Hastings , pp . 143–227 ; J. Bradbury , The Battle of ...

The House of Godwine

Harold Godwineson was king of England from January 1066 until his death at Hastings in October of that year. For much of the reign of Edward the Confessor, who was married to Harold’s sister Eadgyth, the Godwine family, led by Earl Godwine, had dominated English politics. In The Rise and Fall of the House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold’s unexpected defeat, looked far more likely than the dukes of Normandy to provide the long-term rulers of England. But for the Norman Conquest, an Anglo-Saxon England ruled by the Godwine dynasty would have developed very differently from that dominated by the Normans.

Rhetorik in Mittelalter und Renaissance

In den ›Gesta Guillelmi‹ finden sich zahlreiche Anlehnungen an Cäsar, Lukan und Sallust,30 um dessen zentrale Rolle ... der mittelalterlichen in weiten Teilen identisch sei.34 29 Vgl. The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers, hg. v.

Rhetorik in Mittelalter und Renaissance


Gesta Guillelmi

The 'Gesta Guillelmi' gives descriptions of preparations William made for the invasion of England, the battle of Hastings, and more.

Gesta Guillelmi

William of Poitiers was a chaplain in the household of William the Conqueror, and wrote an account of the events of 1066-7. The 'Gesta Guillelmi' gives descriptions of preparations William made for the invasion of England, the battle of Hastings, and more.

Robert Curthose Duke of Normandy

William of Poitiers' text raises the issue of how a biographer is to deal with his living subject, an individual he knew well and admired. the tone of the Gesta Guillelmi suggests that it was a response to growing criticism of the ...

Robert Curthose  Duke of Normandy

New biography of Robert "Curthose," eldest son of William the Conqueror, whose failure to secure the kingdom of England has overshadowed his role in the success of the First Crusade in capturing Jerusalem.

Journal of Medieval Military History

Both were also active on the campaign in England and at the battle of Hastings.14 William of Poitiers, Duke William's chaplain, wrote in the Gesta Guillelmi that Odo and Geoffrey were instrumental in aiding William to prepare for the ...

Journal of Medieval Military History

Highlights "the range and richness of scholarship on medieval warfare, military institutions, and cultures of conflict that characterize the field". History 95 (2010)

Historical Writing in England c 500 to c 1307

William of Poitiers was born in about 1020 of noble parentage at Préaux in Normandy, where his sister became a nun of St ... The Gesta Guillelmi has some undetermined relationship to both William of Jumièges's work and the Carmen, ...

Historical Writing in England  c  500 to c  1307

First published in 1974. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Norwegian Invasion of England in 1066

William of Poitiers ' Gesta Guillelmi was written sometime in the middle 1070s by a former soldier turned clerical writer of noble background who served as chaplain to William's invasion army and was thus probably an eyewitness to the ...

The Norwegian Invasion of England in 1066

Three weeks before the battle of Hastings, Harold defeated an invading army of Norwegians at the battle of Stamford Bridge, a victory which was to cost him dear. The events surrounding the battle are discussed in detail.

Mysteries of the Norman Conquest

William's Army ' , at ' The Engliscan Gesithas ' ' The English Companions ' . https : //www.thaengliscan-gesithas.org.uk/education/the-norman-military-system 31. Ibid . 32. Ibid . 33. The Gesta Guillelmi by William of Poitiers ...

Mysteries of the Norman Conquest

Recent challenges to the traditional site of the Battle of Hastings have led to a surge of interest in the events surrounding England’s most famous battle. This, in turn, has increased speculation that the titanic struggle for the English crown in 1066 did not take place on the slopes of what is today Battle Abbey, with a number of highly plausible alternative locations being proposed. The time had clearly come to evaluate all these suggestions, and Robert Allred decided to take on that task. Taking nothing for granted, Robert hiked round the sites of the three battles of 1066 – Fulford, Stamford Bridge and Hastings. Armed with the medieval sources and much of the current literature, he set out to appraise the evidence and to draw his own unbiased conclusions. Following in the footsteps of the Viking warriors of Harald Hardrada, the knights of William of Normandy and the Anglo-Saxon soldiers of King Harold, the reader is taken on a journey from Yorkshire to the South Coast and down through the ages to re-examine what has been written about that momentous year – the intrigues, preparations and manoeuvres – which culminated on 14 October 1066, on a bloody hill somewhere in Sussex. Whether this will settle the debate over the site of the Battle of Hastings or prompt further investigations remains to be seen, but it will be a book which cannot be ignored and which the reader will be unable to put down!

The Castle at War in Medieval England and Wales

of William of Poitiers (London: Clarendon Press, 1998), pp. 60–7; Bates, William the Conqueror, pp. 162–87. 15. Douglas, William the Conqueror, pp. 178–195; Davis and Chibnall, The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers, pp.

The Castle at War in Medieval England and Wales

In this highly readable and groundbreaking book, the ‘story’ of the castle is integrated into changes in warfare throughout this period providing us with a new understanding of their role.

The Normans in Their Histories

And while the monk was commenting on these literate courtiers , a cleric among them - the Conqueror's chaplain , William of Poitiers – was preparing his own Gesta Guillelmi ( " Story of William , ” c . 1073–74 ) , a panegyric in Dudo's ...

The Normans in Their Histories

Contemporary historians overtly eulogising the Norman achievement are shown to have employed a variety of literary strategies to convey implicitly their treacherous and predatory ways.

Herrscher und F rstentestamente im westeurop ischen Mittelalter

Indeed William of Poitiers and William of Jumièges rested the case in favour of Duke William as the rightful king of England on the assumption ... of the magnates ( optimatum assensu ) , The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers , ed .

Herrscher  und F  rstentestamente im westeurop  ischen Mittelalter


The Medieval Way of War

3 The key primary sources for the campaign of 1066 are William of Poitiers, The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers, (ed.) and trans. R.H.C. Davis and Marjorie Chibnall (Oxford, 1998); the Bayeux Tapestry: The Bayeux Tapestry.

The Medieval Way of War

Few historians have argued so forcefully or persuasively as Bernard S. Bachrach for the study of warfare as not only worthy of scholarly attention, but demanding of it. In his many publications Bachrach has established unequivocally the relevance of military institutions and activity for an understanding of medieval European societies, polities, and mentalities. In so doing, as much as any scholar of his generation, he has helped to define the status quaestionis for the field of medieval military history. The Medieval Way of War: Studies in Medieval Military History in Honor of Bernard S. Bachrach pays tribute to its honoree by gathering in a single volume seventeen original studies from an international roster of leading experts in the military history of medieval Europe. Ranging chronologically from Late Antiquity through the Later Middle Ages (ca. AD 300-1500), and with a broad geographical scope stretching from the British Isles to the Middle East, these diverse studies address an array of critical themes and debates relevant to the conduct of war in medieval Europe. These themes include the formation and implementation of military grand strategies; the fiscal, material, and administrative resources that underpinned the conduct of war in medieval Europe; and religious, legal, and artistic responses to military violence. Collectively, these seventeen studies embrace the interdisciplinarity and topical diversity intrinsic to Bachrach’s research. Additionally, they strongly echo his conviction that the study of armed conflict is indispensable for an accurate and comprehensive understanding of medieval European history.

Medieval Maritime Warfare

4. William of Poitiers, Gesta Guillelmi, trans. R. Davis and Chibnall (Oxford, 1998), pt II, ch 3, 104–5. 5. William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum Anglorum, trans. R. Mynors, R. Thomson and M. Winterbottom (Oxford, 1998), bk III, 448–9. 6.

Medieval Maritime Warfare

Following the fall of Rome, the sea is increasingly the stage upon which the human struggle of western civilization is played out. In a world of few roads and great disorder, the sea is the medium on which power is projected and wealth sought. Yet this confused period in the history of maritime warfare has rarely been studied – it is little known and even less understood. Charles Stanton uses an innovative and involving approach to describe this fascinating but neglected facet of European medieval history. He depicts the development of maritime warfare from the end of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Renaissance, detailing the wars waged in the Mediterranean by the Byzantines, Muslims, Normans, Crusaders, the Italian maritime republics, Angevins and Aragonese as well as those fought in northern waters by the Vikings, English, French and the Hanseatic League. This pioneering study will be compelling reading for everyone interested in medieval warfare and maritime history.

The Anglo Saxons

1071,16 and William of Poitiers, written between 1071 and 1077. ... 17 William of Poitiers's Gesta Guillelmi ducis Normannorum et regis Anglorum has been edited under the title Histoire de Guillaume le Conquerant, ed. and trans, ...

The Anglo Saxons

The popular notion that sees the Anglo-Saxon era as “The Dark Ages” perhaps has tended to obscure for many people the creations and strengths of that time. This collection, in examining many aspects of pre-Norman Britain, helps to illuminate how Anglo-Saxon society contributed to the continuity of knowledge between the ancient world and the modern world. But as well, it posits a view of that society in its own distinctive terms to show how it developed as a synthesis of radically different cultures. The Bayeux Tapestry is examined for its underlying political motivations; the study of Old English literature is extended to such works as laws, charters, apocryphal literature, saints’ lives and mythologies, and many of these are studied for the insight they provide into the social structures of the Anglo-Saxons. Other essays examine both the institution of slavery and the use of Germanic warrior terminology in Old Saxon as a contribution towards the descriptive analysis of that society’s social groupings. The book also presents a perspective on the Christian church that is usually overlooked by historians: that its existence was continuous and influential from Roman times, and that it was greatly affected by the Celtic Christian church long after the latter was thought to have disintegrated.

Myth Rulership Church and Charters

31 If Guy's work seems the epitome of lack of interest , however , the Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers is a rather different matter . In contrast to Guy's writing , the concept of England is fully evident in William's work ...

Myth  Rulership  Church and Charters

This volume brings together a number of essays written by leading scholars in the field of early medieval English history. Focusing on three specific themes - myths, charters and warfare - each contribution presents a balance of both sources and interpretations. Furthermore, they link the subjects: warfare was the predominant theme in Anglo-Saxon myth; charters are an important source for military organisation and can also shed light on belief and cult. Several of the contributions take a wider perspective, looking at later interpretations of the Anglo-Saxon past, both in the Anglo-Norman and more modern periods. In all, the volume makes a significant addition to the study of Anglo-Saxon England, showing how seemingly unrelated topics can be used to illuminate other areas.

King Harold II and the Bayeux Tapestry

10 William of Poitiers (II. xvii–xviii) attributes the Norman retreat to the supposition that William had been killed and relates how the duke cried out that he was alive and rallied them: Davis and Chibnall, Gesta Guillelmi, pp.

King Harold II and the Bayeux Tapestry

Essays on the brief but tumultuous reign of Harold II, and one of our most important sources of knowledge of the time - the Bayeux Tapestry.

The Debate on the Norman Conquest

Notes 1 The Gesta Guillelmi ' of William of Poitiers , eds R. H. C. Davis and Marjorie Chibnall , OMT ( Oxford , 1998 ) : hereafter William of Poitiers . 2 George Garnett , ' Coronation and propaganda : some implications of the Norman ...

The Debate on the Norman Conquest

In the Middle Ages writers were still deeply involved in the legal and linguistic consequences of the Norman victory. Later, the issues became directly relevant to debates about constitutional rights; the theory of a "Norman yoke" provided first a call for revolution and, by the nineteenth century, a romantic vision of a lost Saxon paradise. When history became a subject for academic study, controversies still raged around such subjects as Saxon versus Norman institutions. The debates are still going on. Interest has now moved to such subjects as peoples and races, frontier societies, women's studies and colonialism.

Royal Responsibility in Anglo Norman Historical Writing

We have seen the key conclusions offered by the English account, ASC; to set against them, there were three core Norman sources in Latin which defended William I's honour and legitimacy: William of Poitiers's panegyric Gesta Guillelmi, ...

Royal Responsibility in Anglo Norman Historical Writing

It has long been established that the crisis of 1066 generated a florescence of historical writing in the first half of the twelfth century. Emily A. Winkler presents a new perspective on previously unqueried matters, investigating how historians' individual motivations and assumptions produced changes in the kind of history written across the Conquest. She argues that responses to the Danish Conquest of 1016 and the Norman Conquest of 1066 changed dramatically within two generations of the latter conquest. Repeated conquest could signal repeated failures and sin across the orders of society, yet early twelfth-century historians in England not only extract English kings and people from a history of failure, but also establish English kingship as a worthy office on a European scale. Royal Responsibility in Anglo-Norman Historical Writing illuminates the consistent historical agendas of four historians: William of Malmesbury, Henry of Huntingdon, John of Worcester, and Geffrei Gaimar. In their narratives of England's eleventh-century history, these twelfth-century historians expanded their approach to historical explanation to include individual responsibility and accountability within a framework of providential history. In this regard, they made substantial departures from their sources. These historians share a view of royal responsibility independent both of their sources (primarily the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and of any political agenda that placed English and Norman allegiances in opposition. Although the accounts diverge widely in the interpretation of character, all four are concerned more with the effectiveness of England's kings than with the legitimacy of their origins. Their new, shared view of royal responsibility represents a distinct phenomenon in England's twelfth-century historiography.