The Gothic History of Jordanes

Jordanes divided his work, apart from the brief introduction and conclusion, into four main sections reflected in the contents below. These are a Geographical Introduction; the United Goths; the Visigoths; and the Ostrogoths.

The Gothic History of Jordanes

Jordanes, as he himself tells us a couple of times, was of Gothic descent and wrote this work as a summary of Cassiodorus' much longer treatment of the history of the Goths. Because Cassiodorus' book no longer survives, Jordanes' treatment is often our only source for some of the Gothic history it describes. He wrote the Getica during the later stages of the reign of Justinian, not too long after the demise of the Ostrogothic kingdom in Italy. Jordanes divided his work, apart from the brief introduction and conclusion, into four main sections reflected in the contents below. These are a Geographical Introduction; the United Goths; the Visigoths; and the Ostrogoths. Other large sections, such as the discussion of the Huns, he treats as digressions of a sort the more interesting or important of these have been added to the contents. Mierow prefaces his translation with a detailed literary analysis of all the topics in the text; this is not, however, reproduced here.

The Gothic History of Jordanes in English Version

This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature.

The Gothic History of Jordanes in English Version


Cassiodorus Jordanes and the History of the Goths

This book is a study in the myth of the origins and early history of the Goths as told in the Getica written by Jordanes in AD 551.

Cassiodorus  Jordanes and the History of the Goths

This book is a study in the myth of the origins and early history of the Goths as told in the Getica written by Jordanes in AD 551. Jordanes claimed they emigrated from the island of Scandza (Sweden) in 1490 BC, thus giving them a history of more than two thousand years. He found this narrative in Cassiodorus' Gothic history, which is now lost. The present study demonstrates that Cassiodorus and Jordanes did not base their accounts on a living Gothic tradition of the past, as the Getica would have us believe. On the contrary, they got their information only from the Graeco-Roman literature. The Greeks and Romans, however, did not know of the Goths until the middle of the third century AD. Consequently, Cassiodorus and Jordanes created a Gothic history partly through an erudite exploitation of the names of foreign peoples, and partly by using the narratives about other peoples' history as if they belonged to the Goths. The history of the Migrations therefore must be reconsidered.

Getica The Origin and Deeds of the Goths

It is significant as the only remaining contemporaneous resource that gives the full story of the origin and history of the Goths. Another aspect of this work is its information about the early history and the customs of Slavs.

Getica  The Origin and Deeds of the Goths


The Origin and Deeds of the Goths

Once that invasion was warded off, the story continues with the adventures of the Ostrogoths, the Visigoths, Gaul, Spain, the last Gothic rulers of the Western Roman Empire, their part in the final fall of Rome and their descendant's role ...

The Origin and Deeds of the Goths

De origine actibusque Getarum, or the Getica, is a summary of the now lost account by Cassiodorus of the origin and history of the Gothic people. It tells of the great battles between the Goths and Romans, of the First Great Race War against Europe waged by the Huns under Attila, the Gothic involvement in the great sacking of Rome-and much, much more. Jordanes' work is the single most important source on the origin and migration of the Goths, Ostrogoths and Visigoths. Starting with a fictionalized account of Gothic origins and travels, the Getica then deals with the very real story of the first meeting between Roman and Gothic forces on the eastern borders of the Empire in the present-day north Balkans. It tells of the initial clashes between Roman and Goth, and of how they were eventually forced to become allies against the invasion of Europe by the Asiatic hordes under Attila the Hun. Once that invasion was warded off, the story continues with the adventures of the Ostrogoths, the Visigoths, Gaul, Spain, the last Gothic rulers of the Western Roman Empire, their part in the final fall of Rome and their descendant's role in the Eastern Roman Empire. The Getica is, even after 1,500 years, still a riveting read and brimming with adventure, despair, heroism and incredible deeds which helped shape Europe, and a vital source for early Gothic, Slavic, Roman and Hunnish history. This version has been completely reset and follows the identical margin notes, introduction and literary overview of Charles C. Mierow's Princeton University edition.

Readings in Medieval History

History. of. the. Goths. Jordanes was a sixth-century Goth or Alan who had been
notary to Gunthigis- Baza, a Gothic ... where in 551 he composed his History of
the Goths, largely a summary of Cassidorus' now lost work of the same name.

Readings in Medieval History

"Geary's careful and wise selection of texts in his reader provides the best balance between range and depth necessary for a successful source book." - Nicholas Everett, University of Toronto

Medieval Italy

Thomas Turley JORDANES, CHRONICLER The chronicler Jordanes (Jornandes,
sixth century) was of Gothic origin. ... Around 530, Jordanes composed On the
Origin and History of the Goths, usually called the Getica, which summarized the
 ...

Medieval Italy

This Encyclopedia gathers together the most recent scholarship on Medieval Italy, while offering a sweeping view of all aspects of life in Italy during the Middle Ages. This two volume, illustrated, A-Z reference is a cross-disciplinary resource for information on literature, history, the arts, science, philosophy, and religion in Italy between A.D. 450 and 1375. For more information including the introduction, a full list of entries and contributors, a generous selection of sample pages, and more, visit the Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia website.

The Origin and Deeds of the Goths Scholar s Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

The Origin and Deeds of the Goths   Scholar s Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

East and West in Late Antiquity

Gothic. History: Does. the. Getica. of. Jordanes. Preserve. Genuinely. Gothic.
Traditions?*,1. The nature of the gentes that destroyed or, as some would prefer,
transformed the Roman Empire has been the object of much recent scholarly ...

East and West in Late Antiquity

East and West in Late Antiquity combines published and unpublished articles by emeritus professor Wolf Liebeschuetz. Among the topics discussed are defensive strategies, the settlement inside the Empire of invaders and immigrants, and the modification of identities with the formation of new communities.

The History of Siberia

In the seventh centurythe Gothic historian Jordanes wrote in his work about the
originand deeds of the Goths (see The Gothic History of Jordanes, Cambridge,
1966) that in the east, beyond the UralMountains, therewas theland of the Yugra
 ...

The History of Siberia

Siberia has had an interesting history, quite distinct from that of Russia. Absolutely vast, containing many non-Russian nationalities, and increasingly important at present because of its huge energy reserves, Siberia was at one time part of the Mongol Empire, was settled relatively late by the Russians, and was for a long period a wild frontier zone, similar to the American West. Providing a comprehensive history of Siberia from the very earliest times to the present, this book covers every period of Siberia's history in an accessible way.

Jordanes Romana and Getica

This book offers the first translation into English of the Getica for a century and the first modern translation of the Romana.

Jordanes  Romana and Getica

Of Gothic descent, Jordanes has left us a unique set of histories. The Getica narrates the history of the Goths from their earliest origins until the middle of the sixth century. Building on the lost history of Cassiodorus, it is the earliest example of a history told from the perspective of one of the barbarian peoples establishing kingdoms in the fifth and sixth centuries. It had great influence on later early medieval historians, on national histories of the nineteenth century and on modern accounts of Gothic history. The Romana is a survey of world and Roman history. If largely dependent on traditional Roman histories and chronicles for events up to the fourth century, it contains much unique information for the last two centuries it narrates. This book offers the first translation into English of the Getica for a century and the first modern translation of the Romana. The introduction locates the Getica and the Romana in the context of ancient historiography, building a new picture of Jordanes as a historian and of the two works themselves. It also offers a detailed discussion of the sources used by Jordanes, suggesting possible ways to identify the debt to Cassiodorus. Extensive notes guide the reader through these fascinating but often complex texts.

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

Jordanes completed his tripartite history either in or in the months following
March 551.27 At that point, it was clear that Justinian's ... Instead of acquiescing
to a fully subordinate status, Gothic resisters fought on (until June or July 552).

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

How was history written in Europe and Asia between 400-1400? How was the past understood in religious, social and political terms? And in what ways does the diversity of historical writing in this period mask underlying commonalities in narrating the past? The volume, which assembles 28 contributions from leading historians, tackles these and other questions. Part I provides comprehensive overviews of the development of historical writing in societies that range from the Korean Peninsula to north-west Europe, which together highlight regional and cultural distinctiveness. Part II complements the first part by taking a thematic and comparative approach; it includes essays on genre, warfare, and religion (amongst others) which address common concerns of historians working in this liminal period before the globalizing forces of the early modern world.

The Rise of the Medieval World 500 1300

Jordanes makes a comment often assumed to state that he himself was a Goth,
but the wording is ambiguous. After some form of religious conversion, he wrote
two historical works, almost simultaneously, at the request of friends: a short ...

The Rise of the Medieval World  500 1300

Over 400 figures are presented for their significant contributions to the literature, religion, philosophy, education, or politics that influenced the development and culture of the Medieval world.

The Fall of Rome

Gregory of Tours, Histories Hydatius, Chronicle Jordanes, Gothic History
Olympiodorus, History Orosius, History against the Pagans Paul the Deacon,
History of the Lombards Paulinus of Pella, Thanksgiving Possidius, Life of
Augustine ...

The Fall of Rome

Why did Rome fall? Vicious barbarian invasions during the fifth century resulted in the cataclysmic end of the world's most powerful civilization, and a 'dark age' for its conquered peoples. Or did it? The dominant view of this period today is that the 'fall of Rome' was a largely peaceful transition to Germanic rule, and the start of a positive cultural transformation. Bryan Ward-Perkins encourages every reader to think again by reclaiming the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminding us of the very real horrors of barbarian occupation. Attacking new sources with relish and making use of a range of contemporary archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians, and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. He also looks at how and why successive generations have understood this period differently, and why the story is still so significant today.

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Our chief source for the early history of the Goths is the Getica ( or de origine
actibusque Getarum ) of Jordanes ( whom it was formerly usual to call Jornandes
, a name which appears only in inferior Mss . ) . Jordanes ( a Christian name ...

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire


Ancient History

AH 9760 Ancient Europe - Germany - History by periods - 500 - 1 B.C. AH 9760.1
Wells , Colin Michael . ... AH 9777.8 Freudensprung , S. Commentatio Jornande
sive Jordane libellorum natalibus . Monaci ... The Gothic history of Jordanes .

Ancient History

This volume lists more than 11,000 titles concerning the history, civilization, government, economic and social conditions, and geography of the Mediterranean region and Western Asia down to the Barbarian invasions in Europe and the Arab conquest in Asia and Africa.

Journal of the History of Ideas

3 The Goths , consequently , are in Jordanes ' theory , the aboriginal folk who
spread over Europe and Asia and , dividing into large branches — the Visigoths
and the Ostrogoths — were also known in later history by their various names ,
such ...

Journal of the History of Ideas

An international quarterly devoted to intellectual history.

The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

Goths. and. the. Legend. of. Scandza. This chapter examines the oldest surviving
text which makes use of the 'out-of-Scandinavia' legend: Jordanes' De origine
actibusque Getarum (The Origin and Deeds of the Getae), usually referred to ...

The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

This book examines the sustained interest in legends of the pagan and peripheral North, tracing and analyzing the use of an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend (Scandinavia as an ancestral homeland) in a wide range of medieval texts from all over Europe, with a focus on the Anglo-Saxon tradition. The pagan North was an imaginative region, which attracted a number of conflicting interpretations. To Christian Europe, the pagan North was an abject Other, but it also symbolized a place from which ancestral strength and energy derived. Rix maps how these discourses informed ‘national’ legends of ancestral origins, showing how an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend can be found in works by several familiar writers including Jordanes, Bede, ‘Fredegar’, Paul the Deacon, Freculph, and Æthelweard. The book investigates how legends of northern warriors were first created in classical texts and since re-calibrated to fit different medieval understandings of identity and ethnicity. Among other things, the ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ tale was exploited to promote a legacy of ‘barbarian’ vigor that could withstand the negative cultural effects of Roman civilization. This volume employs a variety of perspectives cutting across the disciplines of poetry, history, rhetoric, linguistics, and archaeology. After years of intense critical interest in medieval attitudes towards the classical world, Africa, and the East, this first book-length study of ‘the North’ will inspire new debates and repositionings in medieval studies.

The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars AD 226 363

... Autobiography, Oration I, translated by A.F.Norman (1965); to Princeton
University Press for extracts from The Theodosian Code, translated by C.Pharr
and others (1952), and The Gothic History of Jordanes, translated by C.C.Mierow
(1915); ...

The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars AD 226 363

The crisis of the third century saw Rome not only embroiled in contests of succeeding short-lived Emperors, but assailed by an increasing variety of hostile peoples from outside its frontiers. Owing to the complex racial interplay of this period, the sources for its history have to be compiled from a wide variety of sources. The least adequate are those in Latin, the imperial lives of the Historia Augusta . These have to be supplemented by the Greek chronicles of Zosimus and John Malalas of Antioch, as well as the Armenian history of Moses of Chorene, the Arabic History of the Arabs of Al-Tabari , as well as inscriptions in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syrian and other languages. This volume collects these diverse sources for the first time in English translation, and will be a uniquely valuable resource for scholars working on a period of Roman history that is attracting increasing attention.