The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

colleges and chantries were suppressed there were fourteen grammar schools in the county. ... at the disposition of people in pre-Reformation England is contained in "School Supply in the Middle Ages," probably one of his best studies.

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England

The greatest single contribution to the history of the grammar schools of medieval England, including the famous public schools of Winchester and Eton, was made between 1890 and 1915 by Arthur Francis Leach (1851-1915). A graduate of Winchester and All Souls College, Oxford and a member of the Middle Temple, Leach was appointed under Prime Minister Gladstone to the Charity Commission where he was involved in the implementation of the Endowed Schools Act of 1869.

The Schools of Medieval England

This was to be a free grammar school for all and singular coming there to be instructed in grammar, to be taught freely and gratis in the form and manner and at all and singular such times as is, was or shall be used in the Grammar ...

The Schools of Medieval England

Originally published 1915. This reprints the edition of 1969. When originally published this volume was the first history of English schools before the Reformation, reckoned from the accession of Edward VI.

The Schools of Medieval England

Abbey Schools. Grammar School. Archdeacon. Harrow School. Boy Bishop. Henry VI. Bushy. High School. Canon Law on Education. Hospital Schools. . Chancellors' Schools. London, Education in. - Chantry Schools. Middle Ages, Education during ...

The Schools of Medieval England


Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

This volume reappeared in an expanded form in 2006 as Medieval Schools: From Roman Britain to Renaissance England. Orme's research, however, has not been restricted to overviews of formal elementary and grammar education in England, ...

Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw a marked increase in the availability of elementary and grammar education in Europe. In France, that rise took the form of a unique blend of trends also seen elsewhere in Europe, ranging from Church-dominated schools to independent schools and communal groups of teachers. Lyon, long a crossroad of ideas from north and south, was home to a particularly interesting blend of approaches, and in this book Sarah Lynch offers a close analysis of the educational landscape of the city, showing how schools and teachers were organised and how they interacted with each other and with ecclesiastical and municipal authorities.

From Literacy to Literature England 1300 1400

39 Of 150 schoolmasters alive in the period 1200–1548 in the west of England, the majority (83) were priests, ... 40 John M. Miner, The Grammar Schools of Medieval England: A. F. Leach in Historiographical Perspective (Montreal ...

From Literacy to Literature  England  1300 1400

The first lessons we learn in school can stay with us all our lives, but this was nowhere more true than in the last decades of the fourteenth century when grammar-school students were not only learning to read and write, but understanding, for the first time, that their mother tongue, English, was grammatical. The efflorescence of Ricardian poetry was not a direct result of this change, but it was everywhere shaped by it. This book characterizes this close connection between literacy training and literature, as it is manifest in the fine and ambitious poetry by Gower, Langland and Chaucer, at this transitional moment. This is also a book about the way medieval training in grammar (or grammatica) shaped the poetic arts in the Middle Ages fully as much as rhetorical training. It answers the curious question of what language was used to teach Latin grammar to the illiterate. It reveals, for the first time, what the surviving schoolbooks from the period actually contain. It describes what form a 'grammar school' took in a period from which no school buildings or detailed descriptions survive. And it scrutinizes the processes of elementary learning with sufficient care to show that, for the grown medieval schoolboy, well-learned books functioned, not only as a touchstone for wisdom, but as a knowledge so personal and familiar that it was equivalent to what we would now call 'experience'.

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature Volume 1 600 1660

Ed H. Anstey 2 vols Watson , E. English grammar schools to 1660 : their curriculum and practice . Cambridge 1908 . Poole , R. L. Early lives of Robert Pullen and Nicholas Leach , A. F. Schools of medieval England . 1915.

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature  Volume 1  600 1660

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Humanism and Protestantism in Early Modern English Education

221 and passim; John N. Miner, The Grammar Schools of Medieval England (Montreal, 1990). 3 As previous note; Roger Ascham, The scholemaster (1570), sig. 31v; Charlton, Education in Renaissance England, part 1; Simon, Education and ...

Humanism and Protestantism in Early Modern English Education

This volume is the first attempt to assess the impact of both humanism and Protestantism on the education offered to a wide range of adolescents in the hundreds of grammar schools operating in England between the Reformation and the Enlightenment. By placing that education in the context of Lutheran, Calvinist and Jesuit education abroad, it offers an overview of the uses to which Latin and Greek were put in English schools, and identifies the strategies devised by clergy and laity in England for coping with the tensions between classical studies and Protestant doctrine. It also offers a reassessment of the role of the 'godly' in English education, and demonstrates the many ways in which a classical education came to be combined with close support for the English Crown and established church. One of the major sources used is the school textbooks which were incorporated into the 'English Stock' set up by leading members of the Stationers' Company of London and reproduced in hundreds of thousands of copies during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Although the core of classical education remained essentially the same for two centuries, there was a growing gulf between the methods by which classics were taught in elite institutions such as Winchester and Westminster and in the many town and country grammar schools in which translations or bilingual versions of many classical texts were given to weaker students. The success of these new translations probably encouraged editors and publishers to offer those adults who had received little or no classical education new versions of works by Aesop, Cicero, Ovid, Virgil, Seneca and Caesar. This fascination with ancient Greece and Rome left its mark not only on the lifestyle and literary tastes of the educated elite, but also reinforced the strongly moralistic outlook of many of the English laity who equated virtue and good works with pleasing God and meriting salvation.

A History of the Peoples of the British Isles From Prehistoric Times to 1688

The most important schools of medieval England were the grammar schools, intended to teach Latin grammar to boys who were destined for careers in the church or, perhaps, in government. (Many medieval government officials were men in ...

A History of the Peoples of the British Isles  From Prehistoric Times to 1688

The three volumes of A History of the Peoples of the British Isles weave together the histories of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales and their peoples. The authors trace the course of social, economic, cultural and political history from prehistoric times to the present, analyzing the relationships, differences and similarities of the four areas. Covering British history from prehistoric times to 1688, Volume I's main themes include: * the development of prehistoric, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Britain * discussions of family and class structures * Medieval British history * the Stuart and Tudor leaderships * the arts and intellectual developments from 1485 to 1688. Presenting a wealth of material on themes such as women's history, the family, religion, intellectual history, society, politics, and the arts, these volumes are an important resource for all students of the political and cultural heritage of the British Isles.

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Culture

The Text in the Community: Essays on Medieval Works, Manuscripts, Authors, and Readers (Notre Dame, IN, 2006), pp. 41-74. Miner, John N., The Grammar Schools of Medieval England: A. F. Leach in Historiographical Perspective (Montreal, ...

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Culture

The cultural life of England over the long period from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation was rich and varied, in ways that scholars are only now beginning to understand in detail. This Companion introduces a wide range of materials that constitute the culture, or cultures, of medieval England, across fields including political and legal history, archaeology, social history, art history, religion and the history of education. Above all it looks at the literature of medieval England in Latin, French and English, plus post-medieval perspectives on the 'Middle Ages'. In a linked series of essays experts in these areas show the complex relationships between them, building up a broad account of rich patterns of life and literature in this period. The essays are supplemented by a chronology and guide to further reading, helping students build on the unique access this volume provides to what can seem a very foreign culture.

Universities and Schooling in Medieval Society

... AND CLERICAL MOBILITY IN LATE MEDIEVAL NORTHERN ENGLAND J. Hoeppner Moran Cruz Elementary and grammar education was ... institutional numbers and framework of these schools , of the curricular content , ' and of classroom practice .

Universities and Schooling in Medieval Society

The 10 papers in this volume examine university and pre-university education in the 14th to 16th centuries in Germany, Italy, France, and England. Particular attention recruitment, financial support, studying abroad, social status, and careers of graduates.

Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers

Grammar Masters in the Middle Ages«, in The History of Grammar in the Middle Ages. ... School ̄: Model Cases of Social Networks in Anglo-Saxon England? ... Miner, John N. (1990), The Grammar Schools of Medieval England.

Ashgate Critical Essays on Early English Lexicographers

The teaching of Latin remained important after the Conquest but Anglo-Norman now became a language of instruction and, from the thirteenth century onwards, a language to be learned. During this period English lexicographers were more numerous, more identifiable and their works more varied, for example: the tremulous hand of Worcester created an Old English-Latin glossary, and Walter de Bibbesworth wrote a popular contextualized verse vocabulary of Anglo-Norman country life and activities. The works and techniques of Latin scholars such as Adam of Petit Point, Alexander Nequam, and John of Garland were influential throughout the period. In addition, grammarians' and schoolmasters' books preserve material which in some cases seems to have been written by them. The material discussed ranges from a twelfth-century glossary written at a minor monastic house to four large alphabetical fifteenth-century dictionaries, some of which were widely available. Some material seems to connect with the much earlier Old English glossaries in ways not yet fully understood.

Education in England in the Middle Ages

This was due to the fact that a study of letters was not possible until a mastery of Latin had been acquired, and consequently it resulted that the term “grammar school” was applied to denote a place in which instruction was given in ...

Education in England in the Middle Ages

"Education in England in the Middle Ages" by Albert William Parry. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Academies and Free Schools in England

The Grammar Schools of Medieval England: AF Leach in Historio-graphical Perspective (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press). Montgomerie, T. (2013). 'Gove blames Lib Dem leadership plot for Clegg's U-turn on childcare', ...

Academies and Free Schools in England

Academies and Free Schools in England argues that there is a high degree of philosophical consensus and historical continuity on the policy of ‘academisation’ across the main political parties in England. It attempts to make sense of what are all essentially free schools by interviewing the architects of policy and their closest advisors, analysing the extent to which they invoke historical expressions of conservatism and/or liberalism in their articulation of that convergence. The book offers a unique insight into educational policy-making during the Conservative/Liberal-Democrat coalition era (2010-2015), and an in-depth analysis of the nature of liberty as it relates to state education in England. Providing original interview transcripts of the key reformers, and new accounts of a sometimes contentious history, Hilton identifies an elite ‘policy community’, connected by educational background, moral-religious frameworks, life experiences and shared networks of common ideology. Academies and Free Schools in England will be vital reading to academics and researchers in the field of education and education policy. It will also be of great interest to school governors, business leaders, political philosophers and those involved and interested in free schools.

All Things Medieval

Stroud, UK: Tempus Publishing, 2006. Miner, John N. The Grammar Schools of Medieval England: A. F. Leach in Historiographical Perspective. Montreal, Canada: McGill University Press, 1990. Monk, Eric. Keys: Their History and Collection.

All Things Medieval

Surveys the material culture of medieval Europe to reveal the nature of everyday life at the time, and discusses the era's traditions and inventions.

The Pastoral Care of Women in Late Medieval England

The song and grammar schools and the universities came into existence to provide boy choristers , Latinate ordinands , and qualified holders of degrees ... with higher office in the church . ” David Cressy similarly has written that ...

The Pastoral Care of Women in Late Medieval England

A close examination of religious texts illuminates the way in which parish priests dealt with their female parishioners in the middle ages.

Lily s Grammar of Latin in English An Introduction of the Eyght Partes of Speche and the Construction of the Same

Miller, William E. (1963). 'Double Translation in English Humanistic Education', Studies in the Renaissance 10: 163—74. Miner, John N. (1990). The Grammar Schools of Medieval England. A. F. Leach in Historiographical Perspective.

Lily s Grammar of Latin in English  An Introduction of the Eyght Partes of Speche  and the Construction of the Same

This is an edition of the sixteenth-century Latin grammar which became, by Henry VIII's acclamation, the first authorized text for the teaching of Latin in grammar schools in England. It deeply influenced the study of Latin and the understanding of grammar. This edition includes chapters on its origins, composition, and subsequent history.

Crossing Boundaries at Medieval Universities

For elementary schools and grammar schools in medieval England see also Nicholas Orme, English Schools in the Middle Ages (London, 1973). 27 John of Salisbury, Metalogicon 1.2–6; 4.25. 28 Jacques Verger, “La Faculté des ...

Crossing Boundaries at Medieval Universities

This collaborative volume explores how the creation and the crossing of faculty, disciplinary and social boundaries contributed to the development of the medieval European university.

Medieval Arts Doctrines on Ambiguity and Their Places in Langland s Poetics

Miner , John N. The Grammar Schools of Medieval England . Kingston : McGillQueen's University Press , 1990 . Minnis , Alistair . Medieval Theory of Authorship . 2nd ed . Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press , 1988 .

Medieval Arts Doctrines on Ambiguity and Their Places in Langland s Poetics

He deals with lexical ambiguity and the ambiguity of words-as-words - in which words themselves are taken as objects - offering linguistic, philosophical, and historical perspectives."--BOOK JACKET.