The Great Illusion

A deep understanding of this would, then, end the need for war. Students of history, political science, and peace studies will find much to ponder and much to argue with in this classic text.

The Great Illusion

First published in 1909, The Great Illusion sets out to answer one of the greatest questions in human history: Why is there war? Specifically, Angell wishes to discuss why there is war between the countries of Europe, which seem to always be at one another's throats. Angell refutes the belief that military power results in greater wealth and instead proposes that advanced economies based on trade and contract law can only generate value in the absence of military upset. War destroys any wealth that conquerors may have wanted to obtain, making the whole enterprise pointless. A deep understanding of this would, then, end the need for war. Students of history, political science, and peace studies will find much to ponder and much to argue with in this classic text.

The Great Illusion A Study of the Relation of Military Power To National Advantage

Obscure Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

The Great Illusion   A Study of the Relation of Military Power To National Advantage

Originally published in 1912. Author: Norman Angel Language: English Keywords: Social Sciences Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Obscure Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

The Great Illusion

The Great Illusion


1910 Norman Angell s The Great Illusion

Features a selection from "The Great Illusion," a book written by the English pacifist and author Norman Angell (1872-1967) and provided online as part of the World War I Primary Document Archive created by Richard Hacken and members of the ...

1910  Norman Angell s The Great Illusion

Features a selection from "The Great Illusion," a book written by the English pacifist and author Norman Angell (1872-1967) and provided online as part of the World War I Primary Document Archive created by Richard Hacken and members of the World War I Military History List (WWI-L). Notes that the book was originally published in New York City and London, England, in 1913. The author discusses international relations before the commencement of World War I and the negative effects of war.

The Fruits of Victory

In the sequel The Fruits of Victory, Angell expands his thesis to incorporate lessons learned from World War I.

The Fruits of Victory

Norman Angell's 1910 work The Great Illusion proved to be a major breakthrough in twentieth-century geopolitical thinking, although its central argument that global conflict was increasingly unlikely because of its mutually deleterious consequences was called into question by two world wars. In the sequel The Fruits of Victory, Angell expands his thesis to incorporate lessons learned from World War I.

The Great Illusion

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

The Great Illusion

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Great Illusion

In 1914, Angell's theory was proved wrong by the outbreak of the Great War, which lasted for four years. However, the book was updated and a new edition was published in 1933.

The Great Illusion

The Great Illusion is a book by Norman Angell, first published in Britain in 1909 under the title Europe's Optical Illusion. According to John Keegan 'Europe in the summer of 1914 enjoyed a peaceful productivity so dependent on international exchange and co-operation that a belief in the impossibility of a general war seemed the most conventional of wisdoms. In 1910 an analysis of prevailing economic interdependence, The Great Illusion, had become a best-seller; its author Norman Angell had demonstrated, to the satisfaction of almost all informed opinion, that the disruption of international credit inevitably to be caused by war would either deter its outbreak or bring it speedily to an end.' The 'Great Illusion' of the title was the belief that there would soon be another major and destructive European war. At the time it was published, there was a naval arms race between Germany and the United Kingdom, and there had been a vogue in Britain for novels imagining a future German invasion (for example, Erskine Childers' The Riddle of the Sands (1903) or William LeQueux's The Invasion of 1910 (1906)). After Angell's book appeared, the flood of 'invasion stories' stopped[citation needed] (one of the last was P. G. Wodehouse's 1909 parody The Swoop! or, How Clarence Saved England). In 1914, Angell's theory was proved wrong by the outbreak of the Great War, which lasted for four years. However, the book was updated and a new edition was published in 1933. In this version, Angell changed his initial argument slightly, he no longer proposed that economics would stop a war, or prevent its happening, but instead challenged that waging a war for economic reasons was a futile struggle, that a nation cannot enrich itself by a conquest of its neighbors. This new thesis earned him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1933, and the economic state of Europe in the interwar era, as well as the Post War era, seemed to bring a new validity to his work.

The Great Illusion 1900 1914

The Great Illusion  1900 1914


The Great Illusion

When Cosmo and 3R-V have to avoid a ring of garbage around a planet, they find that a magician has been sending it to space.

The Great Illusion

When Cosmo and 3R-V have to avoid a ring of garbage around a planet, they find that a magician has been sending it to space.

The Great Illusion

The Great Illusion


The Great Illusion

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

The Great Illusion

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Great Illusion

"Recommended." — Library Journal.

Great Illusion

"Recommended." — Library Journal. Written by the bestselling author of The Gangs of New York, this wide-ranging survey of the Prohibition era is populated by bootleggers, gangsters, and corrupt police as well as such reformers as Frances E. Willard.

Vaccination

Both humorous and educational, "Vaccination: The Great Illusion" is a book intended to make us become more aware of the manipulations and disinformation that prevail in the field of vaccinations (2nd edition).

Vaccination

Both humorous and educational, "Vaccination: The Great Illusion" is a book intended to make us become more aware of the manipulations and disinformation that prevail in the field of vaccinations (2nd edition).

The Great Illusion

"'The Great Illusion' takes a scientific look at the brain itself, presenting research that supports the naturalistic stance that the mind is identical to the brain.

The Great Illusion

This book presents research that supports the naturalistic stance that the mind is identical to the brain. The author argues that if one were to look at the idea that the mind is the brain then it follows logically that free will must be an illusion, that there can be no consciousness separate from the brain, and that there can be no substantial self that exists independently from the brain. He further argues that there can be no such thing as absolute moral responsibility and provides readers with the overall sense that the survival of the human species will depend on a scientific understanding of the human brain.

The Great Illusion

It is generally admitted that the present rivalry in armaments in Europe-notably such as that now in progress between England and Germany-cannot go on in its present form indefinitely.

The Great Illusion

It is generally admitted that the present rivalry in armaments in Europe-notably such as that now in progress between England and Germany-cannot go on in its present form indefinitely. The net result of each side meeting the efforts of the other with similar efforts is that at the end of a given period the relative position of each is what it was originally, and the enormous sacrifices of both have gone for nothing. If as between England and Germany it is claimed that England is in a position to maintain the lead because she has the money, Germany can retort that she is in a position to maintain the lead because she has the population, which must, in the case of a highly organized European nation, in the end mean money. Meanwhile, neither side can yield to the other, as the one so doing would, it is felt, be placed at the mercy of the other, a situation which neither will accept.

The Great Illusion

The Great Illusion