The Great War and the American Novel

This book also explores a development in war literature from novels based upon events witnessed by the authors to more finely crafted works of fiction.

The Great War and the American Novel

This carefully and thoroughly researched book explores the influence of World War I on American Literature and its effects on the American tradition of literary realism. It analyzes war novels written by four American authors who participated in the conflict and details the relationship between their experiences and their fiction. This book also explores a development in war literature from novels based upon events witnessed by the authors to more finely crafted works of fiction. In doing so, The Great war and the American Novel sheds light on a major development in American literature.

The Great War in America World War I and Its Aftermath

The Great War’s bitter outcome left the experience largely overlooked and forgotten in American history. This timely book is a reexamination of America’s first global experience as we commemorate WWI's centennial.

The Great War in America  World War I and Its Aftermath

A chronicle of the American experience during World War I and the unexpected changes that rocked the country in its immediate aftermath—the Red Scare, race riots, women’s suffrage, and Prohibition. The Great War’s bitter outcome left the experience largely overlooked and forgotten in American history. This timely book is a reexamination of America’s first global experience as we commemorate World War I's centennial. The U.S. had steered clear of the European conflagration known as the Great War for more than two years, but President Woodrow Wilson reluctantly led the divided country into the conflict with the goal of making the world “safe for democracy.” The country assumed a global role for the first time and attempted to build the foundations for world peace, only to witness the experience go badly awry and it retreated into isolationism. Though overshadowed by the tens of millions of deaths and catastrophic destruction of World War II, the Great War was the most important war of the twentieth century. It was the first continent-wide conflagration in a century, and it drew much of the world into its fire. By the end of it, four empires and their royal houses had fallen, communism was unleashed, the map of the Middle East was redrawn, and the United States emerged as a global power – only to withdraw from the world’s stage. The Great War is often overlooked, especially compared to World War II, which is considered the “last good war.” The United States was disillusioned with what it achieved in the earlier war and withdrew into itself. Americans have tried to forget about it ever since. The Great War in America presents an opportunity to reexamine the country’s role on the global stage and the tremendous political and social changes that overtook the nation because of the war.

American Front The Great War Book One

“This is state-of-the-art alternate history, nothing less.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) When the Great War engulfed Europe in 1914, the United States and the Confederate States of America, bitter enemies for five decades, ...

American Front  The Great War  Book One

When the Great War engulfed Europe in 1914, the United States and the Confederate States of America, bitter enemies for five decades, entered the fray on opposite sides: the United States aligned with the newly strong Germany, while the Confederacy joined forces with their longtime allies, Britain and France. But it soon became clear to both sides that this fight would be different--that war itself would never be the same again. For this was to be a protracted, global conflict waged with new and chillingly efficient innovations--the machine gun, the airplane, poison gas, and trench warfare. Across the Americas, the fighting raged like wildfire on multiple and far-flung fronts. As President Theodore Roosevelt rallied the diverse ethnic groups of the northern states--Irish and Italians, Mormons and Jews--Confederate President Woodrow Wilson struggled to hold together a Confederacy still beset by ignorance, prejudice, and class divisions. And as the war thundered on, southern blacks, oppressed for generations, found themselves fatefully drawn into a climactic confrontation . . . From the Paperback edition.

Latin American Literature and the Great War

This book explores the ways in which Latin American poets, novelists, journalists, public intellectuals, and a vast number of unknown soldier-memorialists produced aesthetic and political discourses on World War I as a Latin American ...

Latin American Literature and the Great War

This book explores the ways in which Latin American poets, novelists, journalists, public intellectuals, and a vast number of unknown soldier-memorialists produced aesthetic and political discourses on World War I as a Latin American literary event. Siskind presents a unified Latin American corpus that sheds light on the possibility of understanding World War I not just as a European affair, but also as a privileged symbolic horizon against which some of the most important Latin American writers of that period worked through collective and individual anxieties. This corpus sheds light on the interwoven meaning of the nation, modernity, cosmopolitan ethical demands, and the globalization of mass violence. The book interrogates wars (and world wars in particular) as they break down and rearrange the spatial meaning of particular world mappings, and how Latin American writers anxious about their place in the universalized order of modernity might have perceived these shifts as an opportunity to negotiate symbolic re-inscriptions of their political and aesthetic horizon. Looking at texts on ruins and trenches, on spies and politics, on everyday life and affective engagements with the traumatic core of the war, this book unveils a historical and literary archive that reconceptualizes and expands the globality of World War I, inscribing Latin American writers in its discursive making. It proposes productive dialogues and polemics with the fields of British, French, and German war literature (whether modernist, moralist, or sentimental), as well as with the emerging critical discourses of postcolonial war literature and global modernisms.

A History of American Literature and Culture of the First World War

Including genre studies, focused analyses of important wartime movements and groups, and broad historical assessments of the significance of the war as prosecuted by the United States on the world stage, this book presents original essays ...

A History of American Literature and Culture of the First World War

In the years of and around the First World War, American poets, fiction writers, and dramatists came to the forefront of the international movement we call Modernism. At the same time a vast amount of non- and anti-Modernist culture was produced, mostly supporting, but also critical of, the US war effort. A History of American Literature and Culture of the First World War explores this fraught cultural moment, teasing out the multiple and intricate relationships between an insurgent Modernism, a still-powerful traditional culture, and a variety of cultural and social forces that interacted with and influenced them. Including genre studies, focused analyses of important wartime movements and groups, and broad historical assessments of the significance of the war as prosecuted by the United States on the world stage, this book presents original essays defining the state of scholarship on the American culture of the First World War.

America s Great War

A detailed account of America's role in World War I follows the foot soldiers across Europe and discusses the political and social impact on the home front.

America s Great War

A detailed account of America's role in World War I follows the foot soldiers across Europe and discusses the political and social impact on the home front.

The Conning of America

The Conning of America examines for the first time from a literary perspective the propaganda writings produced in the United States during the period of World War I. This American propaganda literature was written in two distinct stages: ...

The Conning of America

The Conning of America examines for the first time from a literary perspective the propaganda writings produced in the United States during the period of World War I. This American propaganda literature was written in two distinct stages: the first stage was written by the pro-War establishment based on the East Coast of the United States before American entry into the conflict. It attempted to vilify Germany and her Allies while at the same time showing England, France, and Russia as the victims of a well-planned organized German plan for world domination—beginning with the invasion of neutral Belgium. The literature urged the United States to prepare for a German invasion of America and to be wary of German-Americans, who most likely were spies in the employ of the Imperial German government. The second stage of propaganda literature occurred when America declared war on the Central Powers in April 1917.While still using the blood thirsty militaristic Hun as a symbol of German inherent evil, the propaganda literature began to portray the Americans as the saviors of European culture. American boys were being sent to Europe on a spiritual mission to purify decadent European culture, while at the same time their sacrifice would rejuvenate and sanctify American values in the fire of the conflict in order for America to take her proper place in the new post-war order.

World War One American Literature and the Federal State

This book shows an empowered federal state as a significant factor in experimental American culture well before the 1930s.

World War One  American Literature  and the Federal State

This book shows an empowered federal state as a significant factor in experimental American culture well before the 1930s.

America in the Great War

But, as Ronald Schaffer recounts in this fascinating new book, the Great War wrought a dramatic revolution in America, wrenching a diverse, unregulated, nineteenth-century society into the modern age.

America in the Great War

After such conflicts as World War II, Vietnam, and now the Persian Gulf, the First World War seems a distant, almost ancient event. It conjures up images of trenches, horse-drawn wagons, and old-fashioned wide-brimmed helmets--a conflict closer to the Civil War than to our own time. It hardly seems an American war at all, considering we fought for scarcely over a year in a primarily European struggle. But, as Ronald Schaffer recounts in this fascinating new book, the Great War wrought a dramatic revolution in America, wrenching a diverse, unregulated, nineteenth-century society into the modern age. Ranging from the Oval Office to corporate boardroom, from the farmyard to the battlefield, America in the Great War details a nation reshaped by the demands of total war. Schaffer shows how the Wilson Administration used persuasion, manipulation, direct control, and the cooperation of private industries and organizations to mobilize a freewheeling, individualist country. The result was a war-welfare state, imposing the federal government on almost every aspect of American life. He describes how it spread propaganda, enforced censorship, and stifled dissent. Political radicals, religious pacifists, German-Americans, even average people who voiced honest doubts about the war suffered arrest and imprisonment. The government extended its control over most of the nation's economic life through a series of new agencies--largely filled with managers from private business, who used their new positions to eliminate competition and secure other personal and corporate gains. Schaffer also details the efforts of scholars, scientists, workers, women, African- Americans, and of social, medical, and moral reformers, to use the war to advance their own agendas even as they contributed to the drive for victory. And not the least important is his account of how soldiers reacted to the reality of war--both at the front lines and at the rear--revealing what brought the doughboys to the battlefield, and how they went through not only horror and disillusionment but felt a fervent patriotism as well. Some of the upheavals Schaffer describes were fleeting--as seen in the thousands of women who had to leave their wartime jobs when the boys came home--but others meant permanent change and set precedents for such future programs as the New Deal. By showing how American life would never be the same again after the Armistice, America in the Great War lays a new foundation for understanding both the First World War and twentieth-century America.

The Great War and Modern Memory

An illustrated edition of a National Book Award- and National Book Critics Circle Award-winning study of World War I draws on a variety of primary sources to offer insight into what the conflict meant to those who experienced it firsthand ...

The Great War and Modern Memory

An illustrated edition of a National Book Award- and National Book Critics Circle Award-winning study of World War I draws on a variety of primary sources to offer insight into what the conflict meant to those who experienced it firsthand and its ongoing impact in today's world.

The Great War

America has entered the Great War, and life is changing.

The Great War

America has entered the Great War, and life is changing. Carl struggles to raise a Victory Garden in their backyard, while Edie tries to fix meatless meals and bake breads using less flour. Other changes are scary. Students are required to burn German books at school, and Carl and Edie are persecuted because their last name, Schmidt, is German. German-Americans are being beaten and thrown into prison. Then one night just before Christmas, Papa doesn't come home from work and the family learns that he has been arrested. He is charged with adding ground glass to the flour at the mill where he works. Will Papa be safe while he's kept in the jail? And how will he prove his innocence?

Selling the Great War

The riveting, untold story of George Creel and the Committee on Public Information -- the first and only propaganda initiative sanctioned by the U.S. government.

Selling the Great War

The riveting, untold story of George Creel and the Committee on Public Information -- the first and only propaganda initiative sanctioned by the U.S. government. When the people of the United States were reluctant to enter World War I, maverick journalist George Creel created a committee at President Woodrow Wilson's request to sway the tide of public opinion. The Committee on Public Information monopolized every medium and avenue of communication with the goal of creating a nation of enthusiastic warriors for democracy. Forging a path that would later be studied and retread by such characters as Adolf Hitler, the Committee revolutionized the techniques of governmental persuasion, changing the course of history. Selling the War is the story of George Creel and the epoch-making agency he built and led. It will tell how he came to build the and how he ran it, using the emerging industries of mass advertising and public relations to convince isolationist Americans to go to war. It was a force whose effects were felt throughout the twentieth century and continue to be felt, perhaps even more strongly, today. In this compelling and original account, Alan Axelrod offers a fascinating portrait of America on the cusp of becoming a world power and how its first and most extensive propaganda machine attained unprecedented results.

The Great War of Words

The Great War of Words


The Great War

Focusing on the decisive engagements of World War I, the author explores the immense challenges faced by the commanders on all sides, looking at the changing weapons and tactics and offering his own assessment on what brought about the war ...

The Great War

Focusing on the decisive engagements of World War I, the author explores the immense challenges faced by the commanders on all sides, looking at the changing weapons and tactics and offering his own assessment on what brought about the war's outcome.

American Fiction Between the Wars

America in the 1920s and '30s saw the emergence of some of the best known writers of the modern generation: John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner.

American Fiction Between the Wars

America in the 1920s and '30s saw the emergence of some of the best known writers of the modern generation: John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner.

The Great War

In an alternative history of America, a divided nation--the U.S. and the Confederate States of America--enters World War I on opposing sides

The Great War

In an alternative history of America, a divided nation--the U.S. and the Confederate States of America--enters World War I on opposing sides

American Journalists in the Great War

American Journalists in the Great War tells the dramatic stories of the journalists who covered World War I for the American public.

American Journalists in the Great War

When war erupted in Europe in 1914, American journalists hurried across the Atlantic ready to cover it the same way they had covered so many other wars. However, very little about this war was like any other. Its scale, brutality, and duration forced journalists to write their own rules for reporting and keeping the American public informed. American Journalists in the Great War tells the dramatic stories of the journalists who covered World War I for the American public. Chris Dubbs draws on personal accounts from contemporary newspaper and magazine articles and books to convey the experiences of the journalists of World War I, from the western front to the Balkans to the Paris Peace Conference. Their accounts reveal the challenges of finding the war news, transmitting a story, and getting it past the censors. Over the course of the war, reporters found that getting their scoop increasingly meant breaking the rules or redefining the very meaning of war news. Dubbs shares the courageous, harrowing, and sometimes humorous stories of the American reporters who risked their lives in war zones to record their experiences and send the news to the people back home.

Over There

Chronicles the rise of the American military and the role it played in winning World War I, from the declaration of war in 1917 to the social changes that occurred on the home front.

Over There

Chronicles the rise of the American military and the role it played in winning World War I, from the declaration of war in 1917 to the social changes that occurred on the home front.