The Greeks on Pleasure

"a wealth of detailed and resourceful argument that helps us to a deeper understanding of the major philosophical issues" - Terence Irwin, Times Literary Supplement

The Greeks on Pleasure

"a wealth of detailed and resourceful argument that helps us to a deeper understanding of the major philosophical issues" - Terence Irwin, Times Literary Supplement

Pleasure in Ancient Greek Philosophy

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical conceptions of pleasure, which is the first book to compare them to contemporary conceptions.

Pleasure in Ancient Greek Philosophy

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical conceptions of pleasure, which is the first book to compare them to contemporary conceptions.

At the Greek Tycoon s Pleasure

Being here had freed him from the tyranny of his grief, had allowed him to rediscover the pleasures of being a man, a red-blooded, sexual male. 'Which isn't to say that we didn't enjoy what we had.' 'No.' 'But it was never going to go ...

At the Greek Tycoon s Pleasure

An accident has forced Greek tycoon Theo Andreou to rest and recuperate. After meeting feisty Sophie Scott, Theo decides that if he can seduce her his recovery will at least be pleasurable! Although Theo's arrogance infuriates her, Sophie can't deny his sensual allure. Their affair is wild and intense. But Sophie fears that this wealthy powerful man can only want her as his temporary mistress, not his forever bride….

A Di Sione for the Greek s Pleasure

... Sione Wife by Caitlin Crews Di Sione's Virgin Mistress by Sharon Kendrick A Di Sione for the Greek's Pleasure by Kate Hewitt A Deal for the Di Sione Ring by Jennifer Hayward The Last Di Sione Claims His Prize by Maisey Yates Collect ...

A Di Sione for the Greek s Pleasure

"Finding my book will take you on a journey in more ways than one." Natalia is trembling. She hasn't left the Di Sione estate in years, but must retrieve her grandfather's lost book of poems from formidable tycoon Angelos Menas—who's just mistaken her for his daughter's new nanny! The brooding Greek and his precious daughter were scarred in the fire that claimed his wife, and Talia is drawn to the man beneath the damaged exterior. She knows the untold pleasure Angelos offers is limited, but when she leaves with the book, will her heart remain behind on the island?

A DI SIONE FOR THE GREEK S PLEASURE

Mills & Boon Comics Eri Kawamura, KATE HEWITT. ERI KAWAMURA .河村惠利 Original novel by Kate Hewitt , USA TODAY bestselling author 2 , A Di Sione for the Greek's Pleasure . Autio ! CRASH WHAM UHH ... I AM AMERICAN.

A DI SIONE FOR THE GREEK S PLEASURE

I came to Athens to fulfill my grandfather’s wish, but instead I find myself drawn to you… To find peace after a traumatic event, Talia’s been living a quiet and secluded life. But at her grandfather’s request, she gathers her courage and travels to Greece to acquire a precious book from his youth. There she meets the book’s owner, Angelos, who, through a mix-up, hires her to be his daughter’s nanny. Talia’s drawn to Angelos, but when he questions why she’s really there, she finds herself torn…

Sophrosune in the Greek Novel

37 I have retained Whitmarsh's translation of this term, a term that is problematic given its complex semantics: the two instances of the noun ψυχαγωγία (2.35.1; 5.8.1) in this text suggest pleasure or entertainment, so this translation ...

Sophrosune in the Greek Novel

This book offers the first comprehensive evaluation of ethics in the ancient Greek novel, demonstrating how their representation of the cardinal virtue sophrosune positions these texts in their literary, philosophical and cultural contexts. Sophrosune encompasses the dispositions and psychological states of temperance, self-control, chastity, sanity and moderation. The Greek novels are the first examples of lengthy prose fiction in the Greek world, composed between the first century BCE and the fourth century CE. Each novel is concerned with a pair of beautiful, aristocratic lovers who undergo trials and tribulations, before a successful resolution is reached. Bird focuses on the extant examples of the genre (Chariton's Callirhoe, Xenophon of Ephesus' Ephesiaca, Longus' Daphnis and Chloe, Achilles Tatius' Leucippe and Clitophon and Heliodorus' Aethiopica), which all have the virtue of sophrosune at their heart. As each pair of lovers strives to retain their chastity in the face of adversity, and under extreme pressure from eros, it is essential to understand how this virtue is represented in the characters within each novel. Invited modes of reading also involve sophrosune, and the author provides an important exploration of how sophrosune in the reader is both encouraged and undermined by these works of fiction.

Art in Greece

One cannot say that this role is purely contemplative because divers interests—religious and civic in the case of the Greek games—may be mixed with the pleasure of being a spectator. But there is the pleasure, to lesser or greater ...

Art in Greece

Originally published between 1920-70,The History of Civilization was a landmark in early twentieth century publishing. It was published at a formative time within the social sciences, and during a period of decisive historical discovery. The aim of the general editor, C.K. Ogden, was to summarize the most up to date findings and theories of historians, anthropologists, archaeologists and sociologists. This reprinted material is available as a set or in the following groupings: * Prehistory and Historical Ethnography Set of 12: 0-415-15611-4: £800.00 * Greek Civilization Set of 7: 0-415-15612-2: £450.00 * Roman Civilization Set of 6: 0-415-15613-0: £400.00 * Eastern Civilizations Set of 10: 0-415-15614-9: £650.00 * Judaeo-Christian Civilization Set of 4: 0-415-15615-7: £250.00 * European Civilization Set of 11: 0-415-15616-5: £700.00

Social Life in Greece

The Catholics are in so far nearer to the Greek standpoint that they do not set their face against human enjoyment on feast - days . They permit relaxation and pleasure at the special seasons set apart for the highest religious cere- ...

Social Life in Greece


Some Aspects of the Greek Genius

But it would leave a wholly false impression if the word " melancholy , " as applied to the representative poets of the Hellenic race , were understood to suggest that for the Greeks there was a keener pleasure to be won from sights and ...

Some Aspects of the Greek Genius


Plato s Philebus

“False Pleasures, Appearance, and Imagination in the Philebus.” Phronesis 48:215–37. ... The Greek Particles. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ... Greek Popular Morality in the Time of Plato and Aristotle. Oxford: Blackwell.

Plato s Philebus

Written in the fourth century BCE, Philebus is likely one of Plato’s last Socratic dialogues. It is also famously difficult to read and understand. A multilayered inquiry into the nature of life, Philebus has drawn renewed interest from scholars in recent years. Yet, until now, the only English-language commentary available has been a work published in 1897. This much-needed new commentary, designed especially for philosophers and advanced students of ancient Greek, draws on up-to-date scholarship to expand our understanding of Plato’s complex work. In his in-depth introduction, George Rudebusch places the Philebus in historical, philosophical, and linguistic context. As he explains, the dialogue deals with the question of whether a good life consists of pleasure or knowing. Yet its exploration of this question is riddled with ambiguity. With the goal of facilitating comprehension, particularly for students of philosophy, Rudebusch divides his commentary into twenty discrete subarguments. Within this framework, he elucidates the significance—and possible interpretations—of each passage and dissects their philological details. In particular, he analyzes how Plato uses inference indicators (that is, the Greek words for “therefore” and “because”) to establish the structure of the arguments, markers difficult to present in translation. A detailed and thorough commentary, this volume is both easy to navigate and conducive to new interpretations of one of Plato’s most intriguing dialogues.

Speaking the Truth about Oneself

is striking in the history of late antiquity and Christianity and so on is that for the Greeks, for instance, the problem of sex and sex regulation was the problem of pleasure. Sex was pleasure. As you know, the Greeks didn't have any ...

Speaking the Truth about Oneself

"Speaking the Truth about Oneself is composed of lectures that acclaimed French philosopher Michel Foucault delivered in 1982 at the University of Toronto. As is characteristic of his later work, he is concerned here with the care and cultivation of the self, which becomes the central theme of the second and third volumes of his famous History of Sexuality, published in French in 1984, the month of his death, and which are explored here in a striking and typically illuminating fashion. Throughout his career, Foucault had always been interested in the question of how constellations of knowledge and power produce and constitute subjects. But in the last phase of his life, he became especially interested not only in how subjects are constituted by outside forces but in how they constitute themselves. In this lecture series and accompanying seminar, we find Foucault focused on antiquity, starting with classical Greece, the early Roman dynasties, and concluding with fourth- and fifth-century Christian monasticism. Foucault's claim is that, in these periods, we see the development of a new kind of act-"speaking the truth" (about oneself)-as the locus of a new form of subjectivity, which he deemed important not just for historical reasons but also as something modernity could harness anew or adapt to its own purposes"--

The Post Nicene Greek Fathers

Pleasure is no part of us , and the Greeks are not right in running down the divine law that would restrain us . By the law , noble examples are brought before us ; and Zeno said , proving the value of examples , that " he would rather ...

The Post Nicene Greek Fathers


Notes on Select Passages of the Greek Testament

On a consideration of these and similar passages we shall have no difficulty in understanding by evdokia the favour or good pleasure of God , shewn towards men ( èv ȧvoрúñоis ) by the birth of the Saviour of mankind .

Notes on Select Passages of the Greek Testament


The History of Sexuality 2

'No brief survey can do justice to the richness, complexity and detail of Foucault's discussion' New York Review of Books The second volume of Michel Foucault's pioneering analysis of the changing nature of desire explores how sexuality was ...

The History of Sexuality  2

'No brief survey can do justice to the richness, complexity and detail of Foucault's discussion' New York Review of Books The second volume of Michel Foucault's pioneering analysis of the changing nature of desire explores how sexuality was perceived in classical Greek culture. From the stranger byways of Greek medicine (with its advice on the healthiest season for sex, as well as exercise and diet) to the role of women, The Use of Pleasure is full of extraordinary insights into the differences - and the continuities - between the Ancient, Christian and Modern worlds, showing how sex became a moral issue in the west. 'Required reading for those who cling to stereotyped ideas about our difference from the Greeks in terms of pagan license versus Christian austerity' Los Angeles Times Book Review

Lexicon of the New Testament Greek

It is the wellbeing and pleasure of an existence perfect according to its kind , which so sympathetically affects him who has to do with it ( let it be remembered that the Greeks even brought kalós into the closest possible connection ...

Lexicon of the New Testament Greek


Biblico theological Lexicon of New Testament Greek

It is the wellbeing and pleasure of an existence perfect according to its kind , which so sympathetically affects him who has to do with it ( let it be remembered that the Greeks even brought xadós into the closest possible connection ...

Biblico theological Lexicon of New Testament Greek


Looking for the Ancient Greeks

The most powerful drive in relation to pleasure is sexual attraction. Many Greek myths, Homer and tragedies focus on the ways people experience and act on the basis of sexual attraction. The consequences are always very damaging to ...

Looking for the Ancient Greeks

This book is a response to Antonio Damasio’s Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain. Damasio, a prominent neuroscientist, begins by explaining what the latest discoveries in the neurosciences tell us about human psychology. He rejects the two prominent models of human psychology since the Western Enlightenment, the blank slate and dualism. Instead, says Damasio, we now know that the brain and body are completely integrated through a complex system of neural maps. Damasio’s recognition of the complete unity of body, brain and mind leads him to the conclusion that we have to develop ideas and ideas of ideas and use them to reform our neural maps. This book presents Damasio’s own ideas about the most “serious” questions in life that we ought to use to reform ourselves and our societies, including homeostasis; spirituality; feelings; suffering and death; the value of religious traditions; and the value of the philosophical path to God among others. The book presents additional positions on the same serious questions from perspectives that it is hoped Damasio will consider adding to or, in some cases, replacing, his position. Most of the book is a discussion of many aspects of Ancient Greek culture, showing how it developed into a complex cultural system that aimed to create exactly the kind of integrated system of neural maps that Damasio claims is so important for us today. As such, this book strives to contribute to our collective need to reform our system of education based on our new understanding of the nature of the human psyche.

Desiring the Good

Philebus holds that what is good for all creatures is to enjoy themselves, as well as pleasure and delight, and whatever else goes together with that kind of thing. (11b4–6)" Socrates purports to describe hedonism.

Desiring the Good

Desiring the Good defends a novel and distinctive approach in ethics that is inspired by ancient philosophy. Ethics, according to this approach, starts from one question and its most immediate answer: "what is the good for human beings?"--"a well-going human life." Ethics thus conceived is broader than moral philosophy. It includes a range of topics in psychology and metaphysics. Plato's Philebus is the ancestor of this approach. Its first premise, defended in Book I of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, is that the final agential good is the good human life. Though Aristotle introduces this premise while analyzing human activities, it is absent from approaches in the theory of action that self-identify as Aristotelian. This absence, Vogt argues, is a deep and far-reaching mistake, one that can be traced back to Elizabeth Anscombe's influential proposals. And yet, the book is Anscombian in spirit. It engages with ancient texts in order to contribute to philosophy today, and it takes questions about the human mind to be prior to, and relevant to, substantive normative matters. In this spirit, Desiring the Good puts forward a new version of the Guise of the Good, namely that desire to have one's life go well shapes and sustains mid- and small-scale motivations. A theory of good human lives, it is argued, must make room for a plurality of good lives. Along these lines, the book lays out a non-relativist version of Protagoras's Measure Doctrine and defends a new kind of realism about good human lives.