The Heart of Leonardo

1 Leonardo's heart studies from the years about 1513 to 1514 represent the pinnacle of his anatomical endeavours. They integrate structural form and dynamic function in a way that called upon his extensive experience and knowledge of ...

The Heart of Leonardo

This book contains all of Leonardo Da Vinci's drawings on the heart and its physiology, accompanied by re-translations of all of the associated notes. All Leonardo's drawings have been interpreted in the light of modern knowledge by a practicing cardiac clinician and anatomist. The veracity of his work is proven against contemporary dissections of cardiac structure and comparison of his illustrations with contemporary images generated by Magnetic Resonance scanners and high definition ultrasound will astound the reader. Perhaps the most interesting element is the re-dissection of the Ox heart set against Leonardo’s own drawings. His place in the greater scheme of anatomical development will be put into context with his ideas of man’s place in the microcosm/macrocosm continuum.

The Heart of Leonardo

The Heart of Leonardo

In this book that unites modern science and Renaissance art, Leonardo da Vinci's exquisite drawings of the human heart are revealed to be as technically accurate as they are artistically brilliant. Leonardo's studies of the heart are the finest of his anatomical drawings. Only recently has medical science confirmed the depth of Leonardo's knowledge about how the heart works. Francis C. Wells, a leading cardiologist, shares his passion for the Renaissance master in this book that explores how Leonardo's achievements foreshadowed modern surgical procedures. Reproductions of the drawings are accompanied by a new translation of the artist's notes and Wells' personal reflections on the value of drawing as vital to the scientific process. The result is a novel examination of Leonardo's anatomical drawings of the heart as a product of both science and art.

Leonardo on the Human Body

Leonardo (da Vinci). fig l . The heart , great vessels and principal viscera . Both ventricles are opened exposing a series of moderator bands and the interventricular septum which contains the channels required in Galenical physiology ...

Leonardo on the Human Body

"It is a miracle that any one man should have observed, read, and written down so much in a single lifetime."--Kenneth Clark Painter, sculptor, musician, scientist, architect, engineer, inventor . . . perhaps no other figure so fully embodies the Western Ideal of "Renaissance man" as Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo was not content, however, to master an artistic technique or record the mechanics of a device; he was driven by an insatiable curiosity to understand why. His writings, interests, and musings are uniformly characterized by an incisive, probing, questioning mind. It was with this piercing intellectual scrutiny and detailed scientific thoroughness that Leonardo undertook the study of the human body. This exceptional volume reproduces more than 1,200 of Leonardo's anatomical drawings on 215 clearly printed black-and-white plates. The drawings have been arranged in chronological sequence to display Leonardo's development and growth as an anatomist. Leonardo's text, which accompanies the drawings--sometimes explanatory, sometimes autobiographical and anecdotal--has been translated into English by the distinguished medical professors Drs. O'Malley and Saunders. In their fascinating biographical introduction, the authors evaluate Leonardo's position in the historical development of anatomy and anatomical illustration. Each plate is accompanied by explanatory notes and an evaluation of the individual plate and an indication of its relationship to the work as a whole. While notable for their extraordinary beauty and precision, Leonardo's anatomical drawings were also far in advance of all contemporary work and scientifically the equal of anything that appeared well into the seventeenth century. Unlike most of his predecessors and contemporaries, Leonardo took nothing on trust and had faith only in his own observations and experiments. In anatomy, as in his other investigations, Leonardo's great distinction is the truly scientific nature of his methods. Herein then are over 1,200 of Leonardo's anatomical illustrations organized into eight major areas of study: Osteological System, Myological System, Comparative Anatomy, Nervous System, Respiratory System, Alimentary System, Genito-Urinary System, and Embryology. Artists, illustrators, physicians, students, teachers, scientists, and appreciators of Leonardo's extraordinary genius will find in these 1,200 drawings the perfect union of art and science. Carefully detailed and accurate in their data, beautiful and vibrant in their technique, they remain today--nearly five centuries later--the finest anatomical drawings ever made. Dover (1983) unabridged and unaltered republication of "Leonardo da Vinci on the Human Body: The Anatomical, Physiological, and Embryological Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, " originally published by Henry Schuman, New York, 1952.

Leonardo Da Vinci

He saw that the heart had chambers . He made drawings of the brain and the skeleton . Leonardo knew more about the human body than most scientists of his time . Leonardo often studied the heart . He made a glass model of the aorta .

Leonardo Da Vinci

Discusses the life, works, and lasting influence of Leonardo da Vinci.

Mitral Valve Disease

The centrepiece of this work was an extensive study of the heart. Virtually all of the drawings from these studies reveal the anatomy of the Ox heart. Whilst Leonardo's seminal work on the Aortic valve is well known, his important ...

Mitral Valve Disease

This book provides a comprehensive review of the basic science of the mitral valve needed to begin to comprehend both normal and the failing valve. This knowledge is infrequently discussed in the clinical arena, with a rush towards definition of lesions based on limited analysis. It provides a ready single source of the most important basic science subjects pertaining to the valve, and the pathologies found therein, and thus a more complete understanding of the factors that result in dysfunction may be appreciated. Mitral Valve Disease: Basic Sciences and Current Approaches to Management includes chapters on embryology and anatomy, including details of structural, comparative and functional features. Since the valve is completely influenced by genetics and molecular biology, subjects rarely if ever addressed in the clinical arena, these topics receive in-depth attention. Coverage concludes with lengthy discussions of the importance of multi-disciplinary work, along with the importance of the electrophysiological disturbances encountered in some groups of these patients. It therefore is an essential and up-to-date resource for the practicing and trainee cardiac surgeon and any researcher working within this topic.

Leonardo Da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci


Leonardo Da Vinci Anatomical Drawings from the Royal Collection

THE HEART as Leonardo worked in detail on the heart only during the last years of his life . . The five pages of drawings in this section are all on the same blue paper and belong to a group of drawings at Windsor , one of which is ...

Leonardo Da Vinci  Anatomical Drawings from the Royal Collection


Autoimmune reactions and the immune system

Illustration 2: The genius of Leonardo da Vinci. The picture on the left is a drawing of the heart by Leonardo da Vinci. The picture in the middle is a drawing of what Leonardo da Vincidiscovered about the bloodstream in the heart.

Autoimmune reactions and the immune system

Autoimmune Reactions and the Immune system presents an overview of the immune system. For the first time a schema with all the elements of the immune system was possible due to all the evidence-based material meticulously gathered in centuries of medical science. This schema has been elaborated with a new perspective on the immune system, encompassing not only the fight against viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi, but as the system organizing the processing of the cells of the body. A perspective shifting from fighting to protection and ultimately to exchange between the human body and its surroundings. To enable this broad perspective a fourth pathway of complement activation was developed, the melatonin-pathway. Dr. Martine F. Delfos is a scientist active in a broad scientific area, combining different scientific fields, who also works as a practitioner.

Zofloya

By the rage which flamed on her cheek, and sparkled in her eye, Leonardo easily discerned that somewhat unusual had occurred. Taking her hand, and tenderly kissing it, ... The heart of Leonardo became infinitely affected.

Zofloya

The protagonist of Charlotte Dacre’s best known novel, Zofloya, or the Moor (1806) is unique in women’s Gothic and Romantic literature, and has more in common with the heroines of Sade or M.G. Lewis than with those of Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Smith or Jane Austen. No heroine of Radcliffe or Austen could exult, as Victoria does in this novel, that “there is certainly a pleasure … in the infliction of prolonged torment.” The sexual desires and ambition of Dacre’s protagonist, Victoria, drive her to seduce, torture and murder. Victoria is inspired to greater criminal and illicit acts by a seductive Lucifer, disguised as a Moor, before she too is plunged into an abyss by her demon lover. The text’s unusual evocations of the female body and feminine subject are of particular interest in the context of the history of sexuality and of the body; after embarking on a series of violent crimes, Victoria’s body actually begins to grow stronger and decidedly more masculine. Among the documents included as appendices to this volume are a selection of Dacre’s poetry and excerpts from Bienville’s Nymphomania, a medical treatise of the time aimed at a lay audience that focuses largely on the dangerous powers of women’s imagination; inspired by improper novels, it is alleged that women may plunge into madness, violence and death—much as does the protagonist of Zofloya herself.

Nonna s House

My back ached from the labor, but I had an even greater ache in my heart—for Leonardo, the head chef. He was from Abruzzo, one of Italy's famous food regions, and was so accomplished that he'd be hired to open restaurants, lending them ...

Nonna s House

This beautiful collection of food and nostalgia features great traditions from the heart of Italy, with delicious recipes and colorful stories from the internationally celebrated grandmothers of Enoteca Maria—a one-of-a-kind Italian restaurant where a rotating cast of nonnas are the star chefs. Enoteca Maria takes great home cooking seriously. At this intimate, hospitable restaurant on Staten Island, all the cooking is done by ten nonnas (grandmothers), drawing on their own family recipes, handed down for generations, which reflect their regional traditions. Here are their delicious homemade pastas, risottos, desserts, and more, which have foodies from all over the world taking the ferry to the forgotten borough for an authentic taste of Italy. Beautiful full-color photography captures the fresh, distinctive flavors of these surprising dishes. Nonna Cristina shares her beautiful Risotto with Strawberries, Black Pepper, and Parmesan; Nonna Margherita offers delectable Stuffed Peppers with Pine Nuts and Raisins; and Nonna Teresa shows off her prize-winning Meat and Cheese Lasagna. Nonna Elvira whips up her peerless Linguine with Cuttlefish and Ink; Adelina creates a savory Tagliatelle with Pumpkin, Sausage, and Chestnuts; and Rosaria makes handmade Spaghetti alla Chitarra with Cherry Tomatoes and Porcini Mushrooms. Nonna Carmelina shares her classic Potato Pie with Ham, Salami, and Mozzarella; Rosa confides her nonna’s secret recipe for Rabbit with Sage; and Nina sautés Chicken alla Capricciosa, with prosciutto and mushrooms. Nonna Francesca launches the book with advice on the time-honored art of preserving everything from olives to soppressata. With its utterly delicious tastes of grandmother’s kitchen, Nonna’s House is a legacy of flavors passed down through generations, now captured here forever. Restaurant founder Jody Scaravella says it best: “If I have a choice between a three-star Michelin chef’s restaurant and Grandma’s, I’m going to Grandma’s. I’m going to the source.”

The Subjectivity of Scientists and the Bayesian Approach

Leonardo adopted the empirical approach by dissecting bodies of human beings and animals and found that the bronchi end blindly in the lungs, and he was unable to drive air from the bronchi into the heart. Hence Galen's notion that the ...

The Subjectivity of Scientists and the Bayesian Approach

Comparing and contrasting the reality of subjectivity in the workof history's great scientists and the modern Bayesian approach tostatistical analysis Scientists and researchers are taught to analyze their data from anobjective point of view, allowing the data to speak for themselvesrather than assigning them meaning based on expectations oropinions. But scientists have never behaved fully objectively.Throughout history, some of our greatest scientific minds haverelied on intuition, hunches, and personal beliefs to make sense ofempirical data-and these subjective influences have often aided inhumanity's greatest scientific achievements. The authors argue thatsubjectivity has not only played a significant role in theadvancement of science, but that science will advance more rapidlyif the modern methods of Bayesian statistical analysis replace someof the classical twentieth-century methods that have traditionallybeen taught. To accomplish this goal, the authors examine the lives and work ofhistory's great scientists and show that even the most successfulhave sometimes misrepresented findings or been influenced by theirown preconceived notions of religion, metaphysics, and the occult,or the personal beliefs of their mentors. Contrary to popularbelief, our greatest scientific thinkers approached their data witha combination of subjectivity and empiricism, and thus informallyachieved what is more formally accomplished by the modern Bayesianapproach to data analysis. Yet we are still taught that science is purely objective. Thisinnovative book dispels that myth using historical accounts andbiographical sketches of more than a dozen great scientists,including Aristotle, Galileo Galilei, Johannes Kepler, WilliamHarvey, Sir Isaac Newton, Antoine Levoisier, Alexander vonHumboldt, Michael Faraday, Charles Darwin, Louis Pasteur, GregorMendel, Sigmund Freud, Marie Curie, Robert Millikan, AlbertEinstein, Sir Cyril Burt, and Margaret Mead. Also included is adetailed treatment of the modern Bayesian approach to dataanalysis. Up-to-date references to the Bayesian theoretical andapplied literature, as well as reference lists of the primarysources of the principal works of all the scientists discussed,round out this comprehensive treatment of the subject. Readers will benefit from this cogent and enlightening view of thehistory of subjectivity in science and the authors' alternativevision of how the Bayesian approach should be used to further thecause of science and learning well into the twenty-first century.

Tending the Heart Fire

THE RENAISSANCE AND LEONARDO DA VINCI: THE FOUR-CHAMBERED HEART During the Renaissance, physicians practiced human dissection and discovered the four chambers of the heart. The human body became a popular subject of artwork during this ...

Tending the Heart Fire

"We are created in rhythm, kept alive in rhythm, evolve through rhythm. Tides, breath, and blood flow in rhythm. We are born into a universe of currents, and our heart is the great conductor of the body, orchestrating our flow." The mystical foundations of all the world's spiritual paths meet in a single, sacred place: the heart of the seeker. We have reached a time when scientific understanding mirrors the teachings of the great wisdom traditions in revealing our energetic heart as the light of consciousness, the fire of love, a field of intelligence. Tending the Heart Fire, the first book by pioneering yogini Shiva Rea, is an invitation to embody our extraordinary potential at this turning point in time, to reconnect your life to the rhythms of your body and the natural world—to live in flow with the pulse of life. Weaving together wisdom from the great world traditions—including yoga, Ayurveda, Tantra, and modern science—Shiva presents an essential resource for becoming a firekeeper of the sacred heart. This diverse treasury is filled with mediations, life guidance, seasonal rituals, and daily practices, including: Insights for harmonizing with the sacred junctures of time—the daily, weekly, lunar, and solar cycles of manifestation and renewal Aligning with the seasons—how to adapt your diet, exercise, and yoga rhythms throughout the annual cycle Ways to honor the great sacred holidays, rites, and festivals Awakening of sahaja—the natural flow at the origins and source of yoga asana and sacred embodiment at the heart of yoga and Tantra Skills for tending your inner fire in every aspect of life and healing imbalances that can support a renewable energy lifestyle A visual teaching with over a hundred full-color images, including reference charts, diagrams, illustrations, and ancient poetry for inspiration The legacy of the Heart Fire is more than eight hundred thousand years old—and in our modern world, we need more than ever to consciously reconnect to the radiant field that transcends time, space, and culture. "The direct awakening of the heart often happens when we are at a crisis point, when the armor of our heart has to crack," writes Shiva Rea. "Let us return to the power and magnificence of our hearts—as living fire, as intelligent energy and electromagnetic radiance, and as our illuminating guide toward love, creativity, and deep knowing of our true sacred nature."

Leonardo s FRENCH Last Supper

I desire with all my heart to aid you, madam, but from my own nothingness expect nothing but the will. Whoso hath faith hope, and love, hath all he requires, and needeth not aid or support......God alone is all in all, and out of him ...

Leonardo s FRENCH  Last Supper

Where are Leonardo's canvas oil paintings he described? This report analyzes the historical and scientific details of a powerful, large painting bought at auction in France. Carbon-14 dates the canvas to around 1460s and the painting to 1514, the time Leonardo was in Rome. It encapsulates the geopolitical strategy of Medici Pope Leo X to create an alliance with France and stop the early church reform. It shows striking improvements to the Milan 'Last Supper' incorporating a mathematical structure, the only painted self-portrait of Leonardo and a replacement of the 'Christ' figure by Julian, the brother of Pope Leo X, who married into the French royal family of Francis I. This great work captures the turning point to the modern era, freedom of thought, religious and political emancipation from the tyranny of the sword and superstition. X-ray photography reveals Leonardo signaled his initials on his final masterpiece, not once with his hands, nor twice but three times.

Leonardo the Anatomist

In his discussion of the heart Leonardo was the first to state that it is composed of muscle ; he was the first to describe it as being four - chambered . The two - chambered heart was an Aristotelian concept passed on by Avicenna and ...

Leonardo the Anatomist