The Hero and the Crown

The Hero and the Crown

An outcast princess must earn her birthright as a hero of the realm—in this “utterly engrossing” Newbery Medal–winning fantasy (The New York Times). Aerin is an outcast in her own father’s court, daughter of the foreign woman who, it was rumored, was a witch, and enchanted the king to marry her. She makes friends with her father’s lame, retired warhorse, Talat, and discovers an old, overlooked, and dangerously imprecise recipe for dragon-fire-proof ointment in a dusty corner of her father’s library. Two years, many canter circles to the left to strengthen Talat’s weak leg, and many burnt twigs (and a few fingers) secretly experimenting with the ointment recipe later, Aerin is present when someone comes from an outlying village to report a marauding dragon to the king. Aerin slips off alone to fetch her horse, her sword, and her fireproof ointment . . . But modern dragons, while formidable opponents fully capable of killing a human being, are small and accounted vermin. There is no honor in killing dragons. The great dragons are a tale out of ancient history. That is, until the day that the king is riding out at the head of an army. A weary man on an exhausted horse staggers into the courtyard where the king’s troop is assembled: “The Black Dragon has come . . . Maur, who has not been seen for generations, the last of the great dragons, great as a mountain. Maur has awakened.”

The Newbery Companion

Booktalk and Related Materials for Newbery Medal and Honor Books

The Newbery Companion

Put a wealth of information about Newbery award winners and honor books (1922-2001) at your fingertips. You'll find detailed plot summaries, booktalks, updated information about the winning titles and authors, suggestions for read-alikes, and ideas for introducing the books to young readers.

The Outlaw Legend

A Cultural Tradition in Britain, America and Australia

The Outlaw Legend

Highwaymen, badmen and bushrangers, both mythical and historical, have been part of folklore for centuries. Remembered and recreated through song, stories and film, this cultural tradition has been remarkably resilient across time and place. Graham Seal shows that these famous "social bandits" share many characteristics, particularly as anti-authority figures, and are best understood within class, ethnic and national struggles. From Robin Hood to outlaws in cyberspace, this book is an important study for folklorists.

On the crown

On the crown


Lesson Plan Book

Lesson Plan Book


Honey for a Teen's Heart

Using Books to Communicate with Teens

Honey for a Teen's Heart

Help Your Teen Catch the Lifelong Reading Bug.Honey for a Teen’s Heart spells out how good books can help you and your teenager communicate heart-to-heart about ideas, values, and the various issues of a Christian worldview. Sharing the adventure of a book lets both of you know the same people, see the same sights, face the same choices, and feel the same emotions. Life spills out of books--giving you plenty to talk about! But Honey for a Teen’s Heart will do more than strengthen the bonds between you and your son or daughter. You’ll also learn how to help your teen catch the reading habit and become a lover of good books. Gladys Hunt’s insights on how to read a book, what to look for in a book, and how to question what you read will challenge you and your teenager alike. It’s training for life! And it’s fabulous preparation for teens entering college. Including an annotated list of over four hundred books, Honey for a Teen’s Heart gives you expert guidance on the very best books for teens.

Robin McKinley

Girl Reader, Woman Writer

Robin McKinley

This study of fantasy author Robin McKinley is the first full-length, in-depth analysis of the author's works, including her award-winning books The Blue Sword (Newbery Honor, 1983) and The Hero and the Crown (Newbery Medal, 1985).