The Historian s Wizard of Oz

Blends an annotated version of "The Wizard of Oz" with a discussion of the political and economic history of the Gilded Age.

The Historian s Wizard of Oz

Blends an annotated version of "The Wizard of Oz" with a discussion of the political and economic history of the Gilded Age.

The Historian s Wizard of Oz Reading L Frank Baum s Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory

While reading The Wonderful Wizard of Oz under the impression that it was a conscious monetary allegory (an impression ... as regards not just 1890s political and economic history but also L. Frank Baum's politics and likely intentions.

The Historian s Wizard of Oz  Reading L  Frank Baum s Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory

The Historian's Wizard of Oz synthesizes four decades of scholarly interpretations of L. Frank Baum's classic children's novel as an allegory of the Gilded Age political economy and a comment on the gold standard. The heart of the book is an annotated version of The Wizard of Oz that highlights the possible political and monetary symbolism in the book by relating characters, settings, and incidents in it to the historical events and figures of the 1890s, the decade in which Baum wrote his story. Dighe simultaneously values the leading political interpretations of Oz as useful and creative teaching tools, and consolidates them in a sympathetic fashion; yet he rejects the commonly held, and by now well-debunked, view that those interpretations reflect Baum's likely motivations in writing the book. The result is a unique way for readers to acquaint themselves with a classic of children's literature that is a bit different and darker than the better-known film version. Students of history and economics will find two great stories: the dramatic rise and fall of monetary populism and William Jennings Bryan and the original rendering of a childhood story that they know and love. This study draws on several worthy versions of the Oz-as-Populist-parable thesis, but it also separates the reading of Baum's book in this manner from Baum's original intentions. Despite an incongruence with Baum's intent, reading the story as a parable continues to provide a remarkable window into the historical events of the 1890s and, thus, constitutes a tremendous teaching tool for historians, economists, and political scientists. Dighe also includes a primer on gold, silver, and the American monetary system, as well as a brief history of the Populist movement.

Oz in Perspective

Magic and Myth in the L. Frank Baum Books Richard Tuerk ... “A Late Wanderer in Oz.” Chicago Review ¡8.2 (¡965): 63–73. ... The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory.

Oz in Perspective

When moviegoers accompany Dorothy through the gates of the Emerald City, they may think they have discovered all there is to see of Oz—but as real friends of the Wizard know, more lies behind the curtain. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, on which the 1939 film was based, was only the first of 14 Oz books. Together these works constitute a series rich in allusions to a broad range of literary traditions, including fairy tale, myth, epic, the picaresque novel, and visions of utopia. Reflecting on L. Frank Baum’s entire series of full-length Oz books, this study introduces readers to the great folklorist who created not only Dorothy and friends, but countless wonderful characters who still await discovery. Close analysis of each book invites readers to search Baum’s fascinating stories for meaning and mythical quality. Progressing chronologically through the canon, the author discusses literary devices and important thematic implications in each book, arguing that Baum wrote for the pleasure of both children and adults, both to provide entertainment and to teach moral lessons. Of particular significance is the argument, sustained over several chapters, that Baum modeled his Oz books on classic mythical patterns, rewriting Oz history in nearly every book to produce a different set of backgrounds and a different conception of utopia for his imaginary kingdom. This variety of backgrounds and archetypes gives Baum’s books a truly universal appeal. Examinations of his non-Oz books and his other Oz works, such as Little Wizard Stories of Oz and The Woggle-Bug Book, illuminate the discussion of the Oz novels.

A Study Guide for L Frank Baum s Wizard of Oz The film entry

The false Wizard is the Republican president William McKinley. ... The only problem is that Baum had no such intention. ... The Historian'sWizard of Oz”: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory.

A Study Guide for L  Frank Baum s  Wizard of Oz  The  film entry

A Study Guide for L. Frank Baum's "Wizard of Oz, The (film entry)," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

A New Literary History of America

tic that readers are delightfully surprised by the contrast in Oz. The 1939 movie in fact toned down some aspects ... The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (New York, 2002).

A New Literary History of America

America is a nation making itself up as it goes alongÑa story of discovery and invention unfolding in speeches and images, letters and poetry, unprecedented feats of scholarship and imagination. In these myriad, multiform, endlessly changing expressions of the American experience, the authors and editors of this volume find a new American history. In more than two hundred original essays, A New Literary History of America brings together the nationÕs many voices. From the first conception of a New World in the sixteenth century to the latest re-envisioning of that world in cartoons, television, science fiction, and hip hop, the book gives us a new, kaleidoscopic view of what ÒMade in AmericaÓ means. Literature, music, film, art, history, science, philosophy, political rhetoricÑcultural creations of every kind appear in relation to each other, and to the time and place that give them shape. The meeting of minds is extraordinary as T. J. Clark writes on Jackson Pollock, Paul Muldoon on Carl Sandburg, Camille Paglia on Tennessee Williams, Sarah Vowell on Grant WoodÕs American Gothic, Walter Mosley on hard-boiled detective fiction, Jonathan Lethem on Thomas Edison, Gerald Early on Tarzan, Bharati Mukherjee on The Scarlet Letter, Gish Jen on Catcher in the Rye, and Ishmael Reed on Huckleberry Finn. From Anne Bradstreet and John Winthrop to Philip Roth and Toni Morrison, from Alexander Graham Bell and Stephen Foster to Alcoholics Anonymous, Life, Chuck Berry, Alfred Hitchcock, and Ronald Reagan, this is America singing, celebrating itself, and becoming something altogether different, plural, singular, new. Please visit www.newliteraryhistory.com for more information.

Adapting The Wizard of Oz

Musical Versions from Baum to MGM and Beyond Danielle Birkett, Dominic McHugh. Caponi, Gena Dagel, ed. ... Dighe, Ranjit S. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory.

Adapting The Wizard of Oz

One of the most beloved film musicals of all time, The Wizard of Oz represents an enduring family favorite and cultural classic. Yet there is much more to the story than meets the eye, and the MGM movie is just one of many ways in which it has been represented. In this lively and wide-ranging book, editors Danielle Birkett and Dominic McHugh bring together insights from eleven experts into the varied musical forms this great American myth has taken in the past century. Starting with the early adaptations of L. Frank Baum's story, the book also explores the writing, composition and reception of the MGM film, its importance in queer culture, stage adaptations of the movie, cult classic The Wiz, Stephen Schwartz's Broadway blockbuster Wicked, and the cultural afterlife of the iconic Arlen-Harburg songs. What emerges is a vivid overview of how music - on stage and screen - has been an essential part of the story's journey to become a centerpiece of American culture.

The Historian s Awakening Reading Kate Chopin s Classic Novel as Social and Cultural History

In A Concise Companion to History, ed. Ulinka Rublack, 247–267. ... The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Praeger, 2002. Dudden, Faye E. Serving Women: Household Service in ...

The Historian s Awakening  Reading Kate Chopin s Classic Novel as Social and Cultural History

The Historian's Awakening is a full commentary on the text (included) that provides social and cultural history context, discussions of the author and her times as well as valuable insight into historical forces that shaped people's lives. • Introduces the novel with essays on the life and times of the author by a leading Chopin scholar • Includes two hundred annotations • Illustrates that understanding nineteenth-century women's struggles, like that of Edna Pontellier in The Awakening, demands attention to more than the usual focus on the oppression of women by men • Shows that Edna's struggle is defined by the conventions of upper-class people in the 1880s and 1890s, is intensified by obligations imposed upon wealthy women, and results in a severe discontent that haunts people in modern societies, even today • Offers readers a deeper and more rewarding reading of The Awakening

Re Embroidering the Robe

The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Selected Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, edited by William H. Gilman.

Re Embroidering the Robe

Religious faith, myths and legends have always been present in literature. However, their role has changed over time. Since the middle of the nineteenth century, with the diminishing role of religion in European society, writers with some kind of belief system, whether religious or political, have tended to use myth in two different ways. They have either retold the old, familiar myths of the past so that they carry fresh messages relevant to a contemporary audience or created their own, new myths as modern vehicles of traditional truths. Many writers have combined the two techniques. Such is the transforming artistry which the eighteen essays in Re-Embroidering the Robe examine: the remaking or new-minting of myth, in literature from 1850 to the present day, so that what it embodies and expresses speaks powerfully to the modern reader. In widely differing ways, therefore, all of the texts analysed here compel attention.

The Road to Wicked

... Finding Oz: How L. Frank Baum Discovered the Great American Story (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2009); Ranjit DIghe, ed., The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (New York: ...

The Road to Wicked

The Road to Wicked examines the long life of the Oz myth. It is both a study in cultural sustainability— the capacity of artists, narratives, art forms, and genres to remain viable over time—and an examination of the marketing machinery and consumption patterns that make such sustainability possible. Drawing on the fields of macromarketing, consumer behavior, literary and cultural studies, and theories of adaption and remediation, the authors examine key adaptations and extensions of Baum’s 1900 novel. These include the original Oz craze, the MGM film and its television afterlife, Wicked and its extensions, and Oz the Great and Powerful—Disney’s recent (and highly lucrative) venture that builds on the considerable success of Wicked. At the end of the book, the authors offer a foundational framework for a new theory of cultural sustainability and propose a set of explanatory conditions under which any artistic experience might achieve it.

Great Trials and the Law in the Historical Imagination

In the (disputed) allegorical reading of L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz (1900), Bryan is thought to be the model for the ... The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (2002).

Great Trials and the Law in the Historical Imagination

Great Trials and the Law in the Historical Imagination: A Law and Humanities Approach introduces readers to the history of law and issues in historical, legal, and artistic interpretation by examining six well-known historical trials through works of art that portray them. Great Trials provides readers with an accessible, non-dogmatic introduction to the interdisciplinary ‘law and humanities’ approach to law, legal history, and legal interpretation. By examining how six famous/notorious trials in Western history have been portrayed in six major works of art, the book shows how issues of legal, historical, and artistic interpretation can become intertwined: the different ways we embed law in narrative, how we bring conscious and subconscious conceptions of history to our interpretation of law, and how aesthetic predilections and moral commitments to the law may influence our views of history. The book studies well-known depictions of the trials of Socrates, Cicero, Jesus, Thomas More, the Salem ‘witches’, and John Scopes and provides innovative analyses of those works. The epilogue examines how historical methodology and historical imagination are crucial to both our understanding of the law and our aesthetic choices through various readings of Harper Lee’s beloved character, Atticus Finch. The first book to employ a ‘law and humanities’ approach to delve into the institution of the trial, and what it means in different legal systems at different historical times, this book will appeal to academics, students and others with interests in legal history, law and popular culture and law and the humanities.

The Final Keystone

L. Frank Baum: Royal Historian of Oz. Minneapolis: Lerner Publishing Group, 1992. Dighe, Ranjit S. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Praeger, 2002.

The Final Keystone

The Final Keystone By: John Kevin Crowley Every case in the history of Jurisprudence involves three things: Trust, Betrayal, and Accountability. Through his education, studies, and observations and experiences, author John Kevin Crowley has learned the interconnection of history, law, philosophy, and religion with the human condition. How that relationship has played out in human history leading to present day is a focus of The Final Keystone. This treatise is the story of us and the source of the lessons left unlearned. It is a reminder of what does not work and how what does work must be ever vigilantly guarded.

Film Criticism the Cold War and the Blacklist

See Fletcher, Allegory, 2n; Carolynn Van Dyke, The Fiction of Truth: Structures of Meaning in Narrative and ... ed., The Historian'sWizard of Oz”: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (Westport, ...

Film Criticism  the Cold War  and the Blacklist

Film Criticism, the Cold War, and the Blacklist examines the long-term reception of several key American films released during the postwar period, focusing on the two main critical lenses used in the interpretation of these films: propaganda and allegory. Produced in response to the hearings held by the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) that resulted in the Hollywood blacklist, these filmsÕ ideological message and rhetorical effectiveness was often muddled by the inherent difficulties in dramatizing villains defined by their thoughts and belief systems rather than their actions. Whereas anti-Communist propaganda films offered explicit political exhortation, allegory was the preferred vehicle for veiled or hidden political comment in many police procedurals, historical films, Westerns, and science fiction films. Jeff Smith examines the way that particular heuristics, such as the mental availability of exemplars and the effects of framing, have encouraged critics to match filmic elements to contemporaneous historical events, persons, and policies. In charting the development of these particular readings, Film Criticism, the Cold War, and the Blacklist features case studies of many canonical Cold War titles, including The Red Menace, On the Waterfront, The Robe, High Noon, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Ordering America

Following Allegory of 'Oz',” The New York Times, 28 November 1991. Ranjit S. Dighe, ed., The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (Westport: Praeger, 2002), 1-9.

Ordering America

Ordering America, painting a felicitous portrait of Western civilization, shows that its defining ideals--rooted in man ́s common human nature, a perception newly substantiated by modern evolutionary psychology--were best fulfilled by realization of the American founding order. Twentieth-century progressivism and postmodern multiculturalism detoured America down the way of social constructionism--human nature and equality are produced by culture and the state, through groups. The book sets a course to revive the Western ideals and return to an opportune center-right American order, applying latest scientific insights and restoring individual responsibility and reciprocity under more limited, still energetic government befitting our century.

The Historian s Huck Finn Reading Mark Twain s Masterpiece as Social and Economic History

He has served as president of the Economic and Business History Society. Dighe is the author of The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory and has had his work published in such ...

The Historian s Huck Finn  Reading Mark Twain s Masterpiece as Social and Economic History

Putting Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in historical context, connecting it to pivotal issues like slavery, class, money, and American economic expansion, this book engages readers by presenting American history through the lens of a great novel. • Presents Twain's book as a historical novel that brings up key historical issues both in the antebellum period in which the novel is set and in the post-Reconstruction period in which it was written • Identifies how Huckleberry Finn underscores perhaps the cruelest aspect of slavery: the involuntary separation of husbands, wives, and children from each other • Ideal reading for college and high school students taking American history classes as well as general readers with an interest in American history, Mark Twain, or both • Provides extensive annotations that are useful, accessible, and interesting to readers without specialized knowledge of 19th-century history

Reelpolitik Ideologies in American Political Film

127 Both Republicans and Democrats complained about the film's portrayal of American politics. ... The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002). 2.

Reelpolitik Ideologies in American Political Film

Reelpolitik Ideologies in American Political Film, by Beverly Merrill Kelley, is a unique investigation that advances beyond typical left (liberal) and right (conservative) political distinctions found in most studies dealing with politics in cinema. This text offers a systematic and comprehensive study of American political films with an extensive ideological filmology. Reelpolitik Ideologies in American Political Film is an essential study of the crossroads of politics and culture.

Gold

Baum, Frank L. 1900. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago: George M. Hill. Dighe, Ranjit S., ed. 2002. The Historian'sWizard of Oz”: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Gold

This encyclopedia provides detailed information about the historical, cultural, social, religious, economic, and scientific significance of gold, across the globe and throughout history. * Contains more than 130 A–Z entries on the significance of gold worldwide, from antiquity to the present, from an interdisciplinary perspective, as well as sidebar entries * Provides unique details and remarkable scope of facts in each entry along with direct references to and examples of primary source materials * Photographs and illustrations of the use and significance of gold as varied as Ca' d'Oro in Venice, royal crowns, filigree, Italian florin coin, Hatshepsut, Rumpelstiltskin, Wat Traimit, and modern "bling" * Extensive bibliography including monographs, scholarly articles, newspaper and magazine articles, primary source documents, and online resources * Detailed subject index as well as list of entries and guide to related topics

The A to Z of Fantasy Literature

The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2002. Hearn, Michael Patrick, ed. The Wizard of Oz. New York: Schocken, 1983. Moore, Raylyn.

The A to Z of Fantasy Literature

Once upon a time all literature was fantasy, set in a mythical past when magic existed, animals talked, and the gods took an active hand in earthly affairs. As the mythical past was displaced in Western estimation by the historical past and novelists became increasingly preoccupied with the present, fantasy was temporarily marginalized until the late 20th century, when it enjoyed a spectacular resurgence in every stratum of the literary marketplace. Stableford provides an invaluable guide to this sequence of events and to the current state of the field. The chronology tracks the evolution of fantasy from the origins of literature to the 21st century. The introduction explains the nature of the impulses creating and shaping fantasy literature, the problems of its definition and the reasons for its changing historical fortunes. The dictionary includes cross-referenced entries on more than 700 authors, ranging across the entire historical spectrum, while more than 200 other entries describe the fantasy subgenres, key images in fantasy literature, technical terms used in fantasy criticism, and the intimately convoluted relationship between literary fantasies, scholarly fantasies, and lifestyle fantasies. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography that ranges from general textbooks and specialized accounts of the history and scholarship of fantasy literature, through bibliographies and accounts of the fantasy literature of different nations, to individual author studies and useful websites.

The Historian s Red Badge of Courage Reading Stephen Crane s Masterpiece as Social and Cultural History

The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Westport, CT: Praeger. Donald, David Herbert, ed. 1975. Gone for a Soldier: The Civil War Memoirs of Private Alfred Bellard.

The Historian s Red Badge of Courage  Reading Stephen Crane s Masterpiece as Social and Cultural History

For someone who did not actually fight in the American Civil War, Stephen Crane was extraordinarily accurate in his description of the psychological tension experienced by a youthful soldier grappling with his desire to act heroically, his fears, and redemption. Stephen Crane's novel The Red Badge of Courage provides an extraordinary take on the battlefield experiences of a young soldier coming of age under extreme circumstances. His writing took place a generation after the war's conclusion, at a time when the entire nation was coming to grips with the meaning of the Civil War. It was during this time in the late 19th century that the battle over the memory of the war was taking place. This new, annotated edition of the novel is designed to guide readers through references made through Crane's characters and how they reflect Civil War military experiences—specifically how "the youth's" experiences reflect the reality of the multi-day battle of Chancellorsville, which took place in Virginia beginning on May 1, 1863, and concluded on May 4 of the same year. The annotated text is preceded by introductory essays on Crane and on the Civil War. Crane's short story "The Veteran" is also included to allow readers to better understand the post-war lives of Civil War soldiers. Explains key background information for better understanding The Red Badge of Courage Includes introductory essays on Crane and on the Civil War Provides the full text for both Red Badge and Crane's lesser-known short story "The Veteran" with comprehensive annotations that illuminate the links between the stories and their historical contexts

Ghost Dances

From Lois Schaffer's family history, an anecdote from George and Clara's daughter Georgianna. ... ed., The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory (Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, ...

Ghost Dances

Growing up in South Dakota, Josh Garrett-Davis knew he would leave. But as a young adult, he kept going back -- in dreams and reality and by way of books. With this beautifully written narrative about a seemingly empty but actually rich and complex place, he has reclaimed his childhood, his unusual family, and the Great Plains. Among the subjects and people that bring his Midwestern Plains to life are the destruction and resurgence of the American bison; Native American "Ghost Dancers," who attempted to ward off destruction by supernatural means; the political allegory to be found in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; and current attempts by ecologists to "rewild" the Plains, complete with cheetahs. Garrett-Davis infuses the narrative with stories of his family as well -- including his great-great-grandparents' twenty-year sojourn in Nebraska as homesteaders and his progressive Methodist cousin Ruth, a missionary in China ousted by Mao's revolution. Ghost Dances is a fluid combination of memoir and history and reportage that reminds us our roots matter.

History of American Economy

Dighe, Ranjit S. The Historian's Wizard of Oz: Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic as a Political and Monetary Allegory. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2002. Friedman, Milton. “The Crime of 1873.” Journal of Political Economy 6 (1990): 1159–1194 ...

History of American Economy

Ever wonder how the American economy became the most powerful one in the world? Tying America's past to the economic policies of today and beyond, the popular HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY, 13E answers this critical question and more, presenting events chronologically for easy understanding. This prestigious book has been used by more learners than any other of its kind in the U.S. Market-leading HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY has helped generations of learners understand how the American economy evolved. Completely updated with recent research by economic historians, this trusted book ties this country’s past to the policies and debates of today and beyond. Visual aids, tables and graphs reinforce learning and encourage interest in the study of economic history. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.