The Holocaust Across Generations

In this chapter the analysis of the social dynamics of the postgenocide family is further explored through a discussion of the multiple ways in which attachments are formed, contested, and negotiated across generations.

The Holocaust Across Generations

Winner of the 2017 Outstanding Book Award for the Peace, War, and Social Conflict Section presented by the American Sociological Association Brings together the study of post-Holocaust family culture with the study of collective memory Over the last two decades, the cross-generational transmission of trauma has become an important area of research within both Holocaust studies and the more broad study of genocide. The overall findings of the research suggest that the Holocaust informs both the psychological and social development of the children of survivors who, like their parents, suffer from nightmares, guilt, fear, and sadness. The impact of social memory on the construction of survivor identities among succeeding generations has not yet been adequately explained. Moreover, the importance of gender to the intergenerational transmission of trauma has, for the most part, been overlooked. In The Holocaust across Generations, Janet Jacobs fills these significant gaps in the study of traumatic transference. The volume brings together the study of post-Holocaust family culture with the study of collective memory. Through an in-depth study of 75 children and grandchildren of survivors, the book examines the social mechanisms through which the trauma of the Holocaust is conveyed by survivors to succeeding generations. It explores the social structures—such as narratives, rituals, belief systems, and memorial sites—through which the collective memory of trauma is transmitted within families, examining the social relations of traumatic inheritance among children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors. Within this analytic framework, feminist theory and the importance of gender are brought to bear on the study of traumatic inheritance and the formation of trauma-based identities among Holocaust carrier groups.

Holocaust Narratives

Holocaust Narratives: Trauma, Memory and Identity Across Generations analyzes individual multi-generational frameworks of Holocaust trauma to answer one essential question: How do these narratives change to not only transmit the trauma of ...

Holocaust Narratives

Holocaust Narratives: Trauma, Memory and Identity Across Generations analyzes individual multi-generational frameworks of Holocaust trauma to answer one essential question: How do these narratives change to not only transmit the trauma of the Holocaust – and in the process add meaning to what is inherently an event that annihilates meaning – but also construct the trauma as a connector to a past that needs to be continued in the present? Meaningless or not, unspeakable or not, unknowable or not, the trauma, in all its impossibilities and intractabilities, spawns literary and scholarly engagement on a large scale. Narrative is the key connector that structures trauma for both individual and collective.

Understanding Genocide

How is the Holocaust understood by people across generations?

Understanding Genocide

How is the Holocaust understood by people across generations? Whereas during, and in the aftermath of WWII, the experience carried immediacy and traumatic meaning for the first generation of Holocaust survivors, received understandings of the second generation may be distinguished from the first. The second generation's perception, recounted from memories by parents and relatives, sought to protect the legitimacy of an earlier generation's lived reality, while also lending further layers of understanding. Now, with the third-generation post-Holocaust, memory is further diluted, posing potential danger of treating the Holocaust as some distant horror having lesser real meaning. This empirical project seeks to explore meaning and understanding of the Holocaust -- the terms that contour the way it is defined in the minds of inter-generational subjects, how use and connotations have changed over the past eighty-plus years, and specifically, how the Holocaust is presented to the world today. The study will analyze use of language, survivor testimonies, interviews, psychology, current events and historical facts to discern whether understandings of the Holocaust have evolved or remained the same.

The Holocaust Across Borders

These personal memories were missing in the new generation; they had to rely on an elaborate public discourse to cope with the Nazi past. Hence it was not only the conflict between generations but also a shift from personal memories, ...

The Holocaust Across Borders

In this book, scholars with expertise in various national literatures and cultures explore how the Holocaust has been represented in novels, memoirs, film, television, and architecture. This book provides a unique vantage point for the scholar and student to compare how national context impacts representations of the Holocaust.

Trajectories of Memory

This volume, which grew out of a conference of the same name held at Bowling Green State University in March 2006, represents new scholarly perspectives on the way in which the Holocaust is remembered in history, literary studies and ...

Trajectories of Memory

This volume, which grew out of a conference of the same name held at Bowling Green State University in March 2006, represents new scholarly perspectives on the way in which the Holocaust is remembered in history, literary studies and theatre. It is a response to changing representations of the Holocaust across generations, disciplines, and in various cultural and national contexts. The contributions address the following questions: How do historians, artists, scholars, and teachers negotiate the language of the Holocaust as survivors die, leaving future generations to respond to the dictum: Never again? How do children and grandchildren of survivors, perpetrators, bystanders transmit the difficult legacy of the Holocaust in American, Israeli, French, German, Swiss and Austrian contexts while navigating feelings of transgenerational guilt or victimhood? How can we do justice to survivor testimony when the survivors can no longer speak directly or mediate the testimony to us? How does transferred and multiply mediated knowledge translate into meaningful artifacts for the next generations? The collection features an interview about interdisciplinarity within Holocaust studies conducted at the conference with keynote speakers Marianne Hirsch and Leo Spitzer. The articles in the first section explore the complex relationship between memory, oral history and historiography in cross-cultural contexts. The second section includes articles on texts by Cynthia Ozick, Thane Rosenbaum, Daniel Handler, W.G Sebald, Monika Maron, Stephan Wackwitz, Jonathan Foer, Art Spiegelman, Georges-Arthur Goldstein, Binjamin Wilkomirski, Elfriede Jelinek, Thomas Bernhard, Tim Blake Nelson, and Diane Samuel.

I Have My Mother s Eyes

I Have My Mother s Eyes


Mexican Americans Across Generations

ish] has a lot of history with his family, with the Holocaust, and so there is definitely that history, but I almost don't associate that with white history. It feels like there is no “white history.” There is the history of our country ...

Mexican Americans Across Generations

While newly arrived immigrants are often the focus of public concern and debate, many Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans have resided in the United States for generations. Latinos are the largest and fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States, and their racial identities change with each generation. While the attainment of education and middle class occupations signals a decline in cultural attachment for some, socioeconomic mobility is not a cultural death-knell, as others are highly ethnically identified. There are a variety of ways that middle class Mexican Americans relate to their ethnic heritage, and racialization despite assimilation among a segment of the second and third generations reveals the continuing role of race even among the U.S.-born. Mexican Americans Across Generations investigates racial identity and assimilation in three-generation Mexican American families living in California. Through rich interviews with three generations of middle class Mexican American families, Vasquez focuses on the family as a key site for racial and gender identity formation, knowledge transmission, and incorporation processes, exploring how the racial identities of Mexican Americans both change and persist generationally in families. She illustrates how gender, physical appearance, parental teaching, historical era and discrimination influence Mexican Americans’ racial identity and incorporation patterns, ultimately arguing that neither racial identity nor assimilation are straightforward progressions but, instead, develop unevenly and are influenced by family, society, and historical social movements.

Between Generations

Not only the survival itself, but the achievements of the second generation and of their descendants, like those of their survivor parents, help to testify to the ultimate failure of the Nazi policy, which proposed the subhumanness of ...

Between Generations


Holocaust Literature of the Second Generation

See also Dani Rowland-Klein and Rosemary Dunlop, “The Transmission of Trauma across Generations: Identification with Parental Trauma in Children of Holocaust Survivors,” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 31 (1997): 358–69 ...

Holocaust Literature of the Second Generation

Exploring five key texts from the emerging canon of second generation writing, this exciting new study brings together theories of autobiography, trauma, and fantasy to understand the how traumatic family histories are represented. In doing so, it demonstrates the continuing impact of familial and community Holocaust trauma, and the need for a precise, clearly developed theoretical framework in which to situate these works. This book will appeal to final year undergraduates and postgraduate students, as well as scholars in literary and Holocaust-related fields, and an audience with personal and professional interests in the 'second generation'.

Third Generation Holocaust Narratives

... often in the shape of family history that has been transmitted from one generation to the next, or is desperately sought through a personal journey of discovery and recovery across generations. At the same time, the Holocaust serves ...

Third Generation Holocaust Narratives

This collection introduces the reader to third-generation Holocaust narratives, exploring the unique perspective of third-generation writers and demonstrating the ways in which Holocaust memory and trauma extend into the future.

Remembering the Holocaust

It incorporates recent research on Holocaust memory across generations in order to investigate the role of Holocaust sites for survivors, their children and their grandchildren, who are known as the second generation and the third ...

Remembering the Holocaust

An intriguing analysis of how place constructs memory and how memory constructs place, Remembering the Holocaust shows how visiting sites such as Auschwitz shapes the transfer of Holocaust memory from one generation to the next. Through the discussion of a range of memoirs and novels, including Landscapes of Memory by Ruth Kluger, Too Many Men by Lily Brett, The War After by Anne Karpf and Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer, Remembering the Holocaust reveals the pivotal yet complicated role of place in each generation's writing about the Holocaust. This book provides an insightful and nuanced investigation of the effect of the Holocaust upon families, from survivors of the genocide to members of the second and even third generations of families involved. By deploying an innovative combination of generational and literary study of Holocaust survivor families focussed on place, Remembering the Holocaust makes an important contribution to the field of Holocaust Studies that will be of interest to scholars and anyone interested in Holocaust remembrance.

I Have My Mother s Eyes

Co-published by the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre.

I Have My Mother s Eyes

Co-published by the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre.

Remaking Holocaust Memory

Documentary Cinema by Third-Generation Survivors in Israel Liat Steir-Livny ... Janet Jacobs, “Descendants of Holocaust Survivors,” in The Holocaust across Generations: Trauma and Its Inheritance among Descendants of Survivors (New ...

Remaking Holocaust Memory

Since the late 1990s in Israel, third-generation Holocaust survivors have become the new custodians of cultural memory, and the documentary films they produce play a major role in shaping a societal consensus of commemoration. In Remaking Holocaust Memory, a pioneering analysis of third-generation Holocaust documentaries in Israel, Liat Steir-Livny, co-recipient of the 2019 Young Scholar Award given jointly by the Association of Israel Studies and the Israel Institute, investigates compelling films that have been screened in Israel, Europe, and the United States, appeared in numerous international film festivals, and won international awards, but have yet to receive significant academic attention. Steir-Livny’s comprehensive investigation reveals how the "absolute truths" that appeared in the majority of second-generation films are deconstructed and disputed in the newer films, which do not dismiss their "cinematic parents’ " approach but rather rethink fixed notions, extend the debates, and pose questions where previously there had been exclamation marks. Steir-Livny also explores the ways in which the third-generation’s perspectives on Holocaust memory govern cinematic trends and aesthetic choices, and how these might impact the moral recollection of the past. Finally, Remaking Holocaust Memory serves as an excellent reference tool, as it helpfully lists all of the second- and third-generation films available, as well as the festival screenings and awards they have garnered.

A Companion to the Holocaust

bears to the personal, collective, and cultural trauma of those who came before – to experiences they 'remember' only by means of the stories, images, and behaviors among which they grew up.”5 This generation includes the children of ...

A Companion to the Holocaust

Provides a cutting-edge, nuanced, and multi-disciplinary picture of the Holocaust from local, transnational, continental, and global perspectives Holocaust Studies is a dynamic field that encompasses discussions on human behavior, extremity, and moral action. A diverse range of disciplines – history, philosophy, literature, social psychology, anthropology, geography, amongst others – continue to make important contributions to its scholarship. A Companion to the Holocaust provides exciting commentaries on current and emerging debates and identifies new connections for research. The text incorporates new language, geographies, and approaches to address the precursors of the Holocaust and examine its global consequences. A team of international contributors provides insightful and sophisticated analyses of current trends in Holocaust research that go far beyond common conceptions of the Holocaust’s causes, unfolding and impact. Scholars draw on their original research to interpret current, agenda-setting historical and historiographical debates on the Holocaust. Six broad sections cover wide-ranging topics such as new debates about Nazi perpetrators, arguments about the causes and places of persecution of Jews in Germany and Europe, and Jewish and non-Jewish responses to it, the use of forced labor in the German war economy, representations of the Holocaust witness, and many others. A masterful framing chapter sets the direction and tone of each section’s themes. Comprising over thirty essays, this important addition to Holocaust studies: Offers a remarkable compendium of systematic, comparative, and precise analyses Covers areas and topics not included in any other companion of its type Examines the ongoing cultural, social, and political legacies of the Holocaust Includes discussions on non-European and non-Western geographies, inter-ethnic tensions, and violence A Companion to the Holocaust is an essential resource for students and scholars of European, German, genocide, colonial and Jewish history, as well as those in the general humanities.

Postmemory Psychoanalysis and Holocaust Ghosts

This book charts a postmemorial study of the Cohen family of Salonica which branched out to Paris and Tel-Aviv during the 1920s and 1930s.

Postmemory  Psychoanalysis and Holocaust Ghosts

Through the collection of letters sent by members of a Jewish family between 1923 and 1942, this fascinating book explores phenomenological and psychoanalytical aspects of the Holocaust and its associated trauma, and the impact on future generations of the same family. This book charts a postmemorial study of the Cohen family of Salonica which branched out to Paris and Tel-Aviv during the 1920s and 1930s. The exploration of the contents of four boxes containing hundreds of letters, pictures and other documents portray a microhistory of one family that was once a part of a thriving community. Showing how the shadows of trauma can be passed through the generations, the book uncovers the tragedies that befell the Cohen family, and how the discovery of these materials has affected existing family members. In an intriguing work of postmemory research and analysis, this book appeals to both scholars of the Holocaust and psychoanalysts interested in the unconscious impact of history.

After Representation

As experts in the study of literature and culture, the scholars in this collection examine the shifting cultural contexts for Holocaust representation and reveal how writersùwhether they write as witnesses to the Holocaust or at an ...

After Representation

After Representation? explores one of the major issues in Holocaust studiesùthe intersection of memory and ethics in artistic expression, particularly within literature. As experts in the study of literature and culture, the scholars in this collection examine the shifting cultural contexts for Holocaust representation and reveal how writersùwhether they write as witnesses to the Holocaust or at an imaginative distance from the Nazi genocideùarticulate the shadowy borderline between fact and fiction, between event and expression, and between the condition of life endured in atrocity and the hope of a meaningful existence. What imaginative literature brings to the study of the Holocaust is an ability to test the limits of language and its conventions. After Representation? moves beyond the suspicion of representation and explores the changing meaning of the Holocaust for different generations, audiences, and contexts.

Holocaust Representations in History

through the same what me—terrible”—he further implicates himself in her disappearance.13 One might argue, indeed, ... Maus addresses the crucial question of how the Holocaust is remembered and represented across generations, ...

Holocaust Representations in History

Holocaust Representations in History is an introduction to critical questions and debates surrounding the depiction, chronicling and memorialization of the Holocaust through the historical analysis of some of the most provocative and significant works of Holocaust representation. In a series of chronologically presented case studies, the book introduces the major themes and issues of Holocaust representation across a variety of media and genres, including film, drama, literature, photography, visual art, television, graphic novels, and memorials. The case studies presented not only include well-known, commercially successful, and canonical works about the Holocaust, such as the film Shoah and Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, but also controversial examples that have drawn accusations of profaning the memory of the genocide. Each work's specific historical and cultural significance is then discussed to provide further insight into the impact of one of the most devastating events of the 20th century and the continued relevance of its memory. Complete with illustrations, a bibliography and suggestions for further reading, key terms and discussion questions, this is an important book for any student keen to know more about the Holocaust and its impact.

Disrupting Adult and Community Education

76); the transmission of knowledge, empathy, and skills from one generation of teachers to the next; and consideration of the lessons of the Holocaust for future generations and in other contexts. This chapter investigates issues of ...

Disrupting Adult and Community Education

Reconceptualizes local, national, and transnational adult education practices in light of neoliberalism and globalization. This groundbreaking book critiques the boundaries of where adult education takes place through a candid examination of teaching, learning, and working practices in the social periphery. Lives in this context are diverse and made through complex practices that take place in the shadows of formal systems: on streetscapes and farms, in vehicles and homes, and through underground networks. Educators may be family members, friends, or colleagues, and the curriculum may be based on needs, interests, histories, and cultural practices. The case studies presented here analyze adult education in the lives of sex workers, LGBTQ activists, undocumented migrants, disabled workers, homeless youth, immigrants, inmates, and others. Focusing on learning at the social margins, this book challenges readers to reconceptualize local, national, and transnational adult education practices in light of neoliberalism and globalization.

Sociology of Religion for Generations X and Y

Church in Liquid Modernity: A Sociological and Theological Exploration of a Liquid Church.« International Journal for the Study of the Chrisitan Church 6 (1): 91¥103. Debord, G. (1995). The Society of the Spectacle.

Sociology of Religion for Generations X and Y

Generations X and Y are plugged into the contemporary world of consumption, popular culture, and the internet. These generations treat knowledge and belief as a more flexible concept, often focusing on the practical rather than the theoretical and often drawing on conflicting sources in both popular and cyber culture. Their approach to religious belief and practice requires a new way of studying the sociology of religion. 'Sociology of Religion for Generations X and Y' examines key world religions - Buddhism, Christianity and Islam - as well as newer religious groups, such as Scientology, New Age, Witchcraft and online communities such as Jediism and Matrixism. The book covers a range of key concepts: secularisation and modernisation, re-enchantment, the 'McDonaldisation' of society, and the easternisation of the west. Each chapter opens with a case study from popular culture or the internet which takes the reader to the heart of the topic being discussed. Employing both classical sociological theory and contemporary critical theory, 'Sociology of Religion for Generations X and Y' explains where contemporary religion and spirituality are coming from, where they are now, and where they are going.