The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence offers the first synthetic interpretation of the humanist movement in Renaissance Florence in more than fifty years.

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence offers the first synthetic interpretation of the humanist movement in Renaissance Florence in more than fifty years.

The World of Renaissance Florence

arguments which arose inevitably in the humanist movement , stood solidly behind his work as an educator and a doughty defender of the new culture . Niccolò Niccoli , whom Vespasiano da Bisticci the Florentine biographer ( 1421-98 ) ...

The World of Renaissance Florence

Arte, politica, vita quotidiana nella culla del Rinascimento italiano. Dallo splendore dei Medici ai grandi maestri d'arte quali Botticelli, Michelangelo e Leonardo, il ritratto, interamente in inglese, di una città che ha cambiato la storia del mondo: Firenze. Annotation Supplied by Informazioni Editoriali

Florence in the Early Modern World

On the distinct cultural and social contexts of Florentine humanism, see, most recently, Brian Jeffrey Maxson, The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). Ronald G. Witt, In the Footsteps of ...

Florence in the Early Modern World

Florence in the Early Modern World offers new perspectives on this important city by exploring the broader global context of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, within which the experience of Florence remains unique. By exploring the city’s relationship to its close and distant neighbours, this collection of interdisciplinary essays reveals the transnational history of Florence. The chapters orient the lenses of the most recent historiographical turns perfected in studies on Venice, Rome, Bologna, Naples, and elsewhere towards Florence. New techniques, such as digital mapping, alongside new comparisons of architectural theory and merchants in Eurasia, provide the latest perspectives about Florence’s cultural and political importance before, during, and after the Renaissance. From Florentine merchants in Egypt and India, through actual and idealized military ambitions in the sixteenth-century Mediterranean, to Tuscan humanists in late medieval England, the contributors to this interdisciplinary volume reveal the connections Florence held to early modern cities across the globe. This book steers away from the historical narrative of an insular Renaissance Europe and instead identifies the significance of other global influences. By using Florence as a case study to trace these connections, this volume of essays provides essential reading for students and scholars of early modern cities and the Renaissance.

Secretaries and Statecraft in the Early Modern World

Gene Brucker, The Civic World of Early Renaissance Florence (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977); Dale Kent, The Rise of the Medici: Faction in Florence, 1426–1434 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978); Witt, In the Footsteps ...

Secretaries and Statecraft in the Early Modern World

One of the prominent themes of the political history of the 16th and 17th centuries is the waxing influence officials in the exercise of state power, particularly in international relations, as it became impossible for monarchs to stay on top of the increasingly complex demands of ruling. Encompassing a variety of cultural and institutional settings, these essays examine how state secretaries, prime ministers and favourites managed diplomatic personnel and the information flows they generated. They explore how these officials balanced domestic matters with external concerns, and service to the monarch and state with personal ambition. By opening various perspectives on policy-making at the level just below the monarch, this volume offers up rich opportunities for comparative history and a new take on the diplomatic history of the period.

The World of Renaissance Florence

Humanism was the great driving force in the first decades of the fifteenth century , the dominant factor in Florentine culture and civic life . Around Leonardo Bruni were other scholars and masters who , although often divided in the ...

The World of Renaissance Florence


Interpreting Early Modern Europe

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence. New York: Cambridge University Press. Muir, Edward (1981). Civic Ritual in Renaissance Venice. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Najemy, John M. (2006). A History of Florence, ...

Interpreting Early Modern Europe

Interpreting Early Modern Europe is a comprehensive collection of essays on the historiography of the early modern period (circa 1450-1800). Concerned with the principles, priorities, theories, and narratives behind the writing of early modern history, the book places particular emphasis on developments in recent scholarship. Each chapter, written by a prominent historian caught up in the debates, is devoted to the varieties of interpretation relating to a specific theme or field considered integral to understanding the age, providing readers with a ‘behind-the-scenes’ look at how historians have worked, and still work, within these fields. At one level the emphasis is historiographical, with the essays engaged in a direct dialogue with the influential theories, methods, assumptions, and conclusions in each of the fields. At another level the contributions emphasise the historical dimensions of interpretation, providing readers with surveys of the component parts that make up the modern narratives. Supported by extensive bibliographies, primary materials, and appendices with extracts from key secondary debates, Interpreting Early Modern Europe provides a systematic exploration of how historians have shaped the study of the early modern past. It is essential reading for students of early modern history.

The Family in Renaissance Florence

The chief merit of the work lies in its scope: it directly assays the personal value system of the Florentine bourgeois class, which did so much to foster the development of art, literature, and science.

The Family in Renaissance Florence

"I libri della famiglia has long been viewed by Italians as a classic of Italian literature. It displays a variety of styles--high rhetoric, systematic moral exposition, novelistic portrayal of character--in the typical Renaissance framework of the dialogue. The chief merit of the work lies in its scope: it directly assays the personal value system of the Florentine bourgeois class, which did so much to foster the development of art, literature, and science. This translation is based upon the critical edition by Cecil Grayson, Serena Professor of Italian Studies, Oxford."--Jacket.

Dante and Renaissance Florence

The book focuses on a variety of texts, both Latin and vernacular, in which reference was made to Dante, from commentaries to poetry, from literary lives to letters, from histories to dialogues.

Dante and Renaissance Florence

Simon Gilson examines Dante's reception in Florence in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, when Dante was represented, commemorated and debated in all media in a wide variety of ways. Gilson pays particular attention to Dante's influence on major authors such as Boccaccio and Petrarch, on Italian humanism, and on civic identity and popular culture in Florence. Ranging across literature, philosophy and art, across languages and across social groups, Gilson's study fully illuminates for the first time Dante's central place in Italian Renaissance culture and thought.

Giannozzo Manetti

The Life of a Florentine Humanist David Marsh ... The Social World of the Florentine Humanists, 1390–1460. ... In Rhetorik in Mittelalter und Renaissance: Konzepte–Praxis–Diversität, edited by Georg Strack and Julia Knödler, 393–412.

Giannozzo Manetti

Giannozzo Manetti was one of the most remarkable figures of the Italian Renaissance, though today his works are unfamiliar in English. In this authoritative biography, the first ever in English, David Marsh guides readers through the vast range of Manetti’s writings, which epitomized the new humanist scholarship of the quattrocento.

Voices and Texts in Early Modern Italian Society

In addition, see Peter howard, 'Preaching Magnificence in Renaissance Florence', Renaissance Quarterly, 61 (2008), 325–69; Brian Jeffrey Maxson, The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

Voices and Texts in Early Modern Italian Society

This book studies the uses of orality in Italian society, across all classes, from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century, with an emphasis on the interrelationships between oral communication and the written word. The Introduction provides an overview of the topic as a whole and links the chapters together. Part 1 concerns public life in the states of northern, central, and southern Italy. The chapters examine a range of performances that used the spoken word or song: concerted shouts that expressed the feelings of the lower classes and were then recorded in writing; the proclamation of state policy by town criers; songs that gave news of executions; the exercise of power relations in society as recorded in trial records; and diplomatic orations and interactions. Part 2 centres on private entertainments. It considers the practices of the performance of poetry sung in social gatherings and on stage with and without improvisation; the extent to which lyric poets anticipated the singing of their verse and collaborated with composers; performances of comedies given as dinner entertainments for the governing body of republican Florence; and a reading of a prose work in a house in Venice, subsequently made famous through a printed account. Part 3 concerns collective religious practices. Its chapters study sermons in their own right and in relation to written texts, the battle to control spaces for public performance by civic and religious authorities, and singing texts in sacred spaces.

Sociology of the Renaissance

Florence. and. Humanism. in. the. Age. of. the. Renaissance. Baron, Hans. The Crisis of the Early Renaissance: Civic Humanism and Republican Liberty in an Age of ... Maxson, Brian J. The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence.

Sociology of the Renaissance

This classic work marks the culmination of a definite stage in the socio-economic historiography from the late Middle Ages to the rise of the haute bourgeoisie in the early Renaissance. Here Alfred von Martin attempts to discover and define the spirit or essence of the Renaissance, and with it the spirit of early capitalism as it arose in Florence. His analysis focuses on the capitalist haute bourgeois who represented the economically, politically, and culturally dominant class of the Renaissance. As he shows, eventually its decline brings about a new stasis in the aristocratization of the great bourgeoisie as well as the rise of despotism in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The shift from an agricultural to a commercial economy was unquestionably one of the essential elements in the transition from medieval to Renaissance civilization. This book’s republication is a welcome development and will make this classic accessible again to scholars of the Renaissance and Renaissance humanism. In addition to its new introduction, it also includes a bibliography of von Martin’s extensive writings.

Contesting the Renaissance

In this book, William Caferro asks if the Renaissance was really a period of progress, reason, the emergence of the individual, and the beginning of modernity.

Contesting the Renaissance

In this book, William Caferro asks if the Renaissance was really a period of progress, reason, the emergence of the individual, and the beginning of modernity. An influential investigation into the nature of the European Renaissance Summarizes scholarly debates about the nature of the Renaissance Engages with specific controversies concerning gender identity, economics, the emergence of the modern state, and reason and faith Takes a balanced approach to the many different problems and perspectives that characterize Renaissance studies

The Politics of Culture in Quattrocento Europe

This necessarily involves an approach to the politics of Renaissance humanism distinct from the more usual focus on the study ... 32 An important new approach to the humanist world of Florence has recently been offered by Brian Maxson ...

The Politics of Culture in Quattrocento Europe

The poet-king without a throne appears here in an entirely new light. In The Politics of Culture in Quattrocento Europe: René of Anjou in Italy, Oren Margolis explores how this French prince and exiled king of Naples (1409-1480) engaged his Italian network in a programme of cultural politics conducted with an eye towards a return to power in the peninsula. Built on a series of original interpretations of humanistic and artistic material (chiefly Latin orations and illuminated manuscripts of classical texts), this is also a case study for a 'diplomatic approach' to culture. It recasts its source base as a form of high-level communication for a hyper-literate elite of those who could read the works created by humanist and artistic agents for their constituent parts: the potent words or phrases and relevant classical allusions; the channels through which a given work was commissioned or transmitted; and then the nature of the network gathered around a political agenda. This is a volume for all those interested in the politics and culture of later medieval Europe and Renaissance Italy: the kings of France and dukes of Burgundy, the Medici, the Sforza, the Venetians, and their armies, ambassadors, and adversaries all appear here; so do Giovanni Bellini, Andrea Mantegna, Guarino of Verona, and their respective intellectual and artistic circles. Emerging from it is a challenge to conventional interpretations of the politics of humanism, and a new vision of the Quattrocento: a century in which the Italian Renaissance began its takeover of Europe, but in which Renaissance culture was itself shaped by its European political, social, and diplomatic context.

Venetian Humanism in an Age of Patrician Dominance

It was less fluid, less imaginative, less original than the humanism of Florence. ... Civic World of Early Renaissance Florence, Chapter Five, and for the relationship between the emergence of that patriciate and the development of ...

Venetian Humanism in an Age of Patrician Dominance

In comprehensive detail Margaret King analyzes the activities of the patricians who were predominant in the ranks of the humanists and who made humanist thought a powerful tool in the service of their class and of the city itself. Originally published in 1986. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Intellectual Struggle for Florence

Instead of simply describing early Renaissance ideas, this volume attempts to relate these ideas to specific social and political conflicts of the fifteenth century, and specifically to the development of the Medici regime.

The Intellectual Struggle for Florence

The Intellectual Struggle for Florence is an analysis of the ideology that developed in Florence with the rise of the Medici, during the early fifteenth century, the period long recognized as the most formative of the early Renaissance. Instead of simply describing early Renaissance ideas, this volume attempts to relate these ideas to specific social and political conflicts of the fifteenth century, and specifically to the development of the Medici regime. It first shows how the Medici party came to be viewed as fundamentally different from their opponents, the 'oligarchs', then explores the intellectual world of these oligarchs (the 'traditional culture'). As political conflicts sharpened, some humanists (Leonardo Bruni and Francesco Filelfo) with close ties to oligarchy still attempted to enrich traditional culture with classical learning, while others, such as Niccolò Niccoli and Poggio Bracciolini, rejected tradition outright and created a new ideology for the Medici party. What is striking is the extent to which Niccoli and Poggio were able to turn a Latin or classical culture into a 'popular culture', and how the culture of the vernacular remained traditional and oligarchic.

Rhetorik in Mittelalter und Renaissance

»Rhetorik« als ein komplexes System, das verschiedene Wissensbestände integriert, war schon in der Vormoderne sowohl Teil der akademischen Grundlagenbildung als auch Objekt philosophischer Reflexion.

Rhetorik in Mittelalter und Renaissance

»Rhetorik« als ein komplexes System, das verschiedene Wissensbestände integriert, war schon in der Vormoderne sowohl Teil der akademischen Grundlagenbildung als auch Objekt philosophischer Reflexion. Folglich ist ihre Erforschung seit jeher Bestandteil der Mittelalter- und Renaissancestudien. Die Beiträge des vorliegenden Bandes, der die Ergebnisse einer interdisziplinären Tagung des Zentrums für Mittelalter- und Renaissancestudien der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München enthält, nehmen ein breites Spektrum rhetorischer Konzepte und Praktiken vom Frühmittelalter bis in die Reformationszeit in den Blick. Dabei knüpfen sie an etablierte Fragestellungen der Kultur-, Literatur- und Sprachgeschichte an und befragen die theoretischen, literarischen und oratorischen Texte auch im Hinblick auf Konstruktionen kultureller und religiöser Diversität. Sie entwickeln so eine neue Perspektive auf die historische Rhetorikforschung

A Short History of Florence and the Florentine Republic

This book shows why Florence, harbinger and heartland of the Renaissance, is and has always been unique.

A Short History of Florence and the Florentine Republic

The innovative city culture of Florence was the crucible within which Renaissance ideas first caught fire. With its soaring cathedral dome and its classically-inspired palaces and piazzas, it is perhaps the finest single expression of a society that is still at its heart an urban one. For, as Brian Jeffrey Maxson reveals, it is above all the city-state – the walled commune which became the chief driver of European commerce, culture, banking and art – that is medieval Italy's enduring legacy to the present. Charting the transition of Florence from an obscure Guelph republic to a regional superpower in which the glittering court of Lorenzo the Magnificent became the pride and envy of the continent, the author authoritatively discusses a city that looked to the past for ideas even as it articulated a novel creativity. Uncovering passionate dispute and intrigue, Maxson sheds fresh light too on seminal events like the fiery end of oratorical firebrand Savonarola and Giuliano de' Medici's brutal murder by the rival Pazzi family. This book shows why Florence, harbinger and heartland of the Renaissance, is and has always been unique.

Humanism and the Urban World

"Explores Italian Renaissance writer and architect Leon Battista Alberti's complex and sometimes ambivalent attitudes toward the concept of the city, and relates them to his broader intellectual positions" --Provided by publisher.

Humanism and the Urban World

"Explores Italian Renaissance writer and architect Leon Battista Alberti's complex and sometimes ambivalent attitudes toward the concept of the city, and relates them to his broader intellectual positions" --Provided by publisher.

A Companion to the Worlds of the Renaissance

This volume brings together some of the most exciting renaissance scholars to suggest new ways of thinking about the period and to set a new series of agendas for Renaissance scholarship.

A Companion to the Worlds of the Renaissance

This volume brings together some of the most exciting renaissance scholars to suggest new ways of thinking about the period and to set a new series of agendas for Renaissance scholarship. Overturns the idea that it was a period of European cultural triumph and highlights the negative as well as the positive. Looks at the Renaissance from a world, as opposed to just European, perspective. Views the Renaissance from perspectives other than just the cultural elite. Gender, sex, violence, and cultural history are integrated into the analysis.

Printing a Mediterranean World

In 1482, the Florentine humanist and statesman Francesco Berlinghieri produced the Geographia, a book of over one hundred folio leaves describing the world in Italian verse, inspired by the ancient Greek geography of Ptolemy.

Printing a Mediterranean World

In 1482 Francesco Berlinghieri produced the Geographia, a book of over 100 folio leaves describing the world in Italian verse interleaved with lavishly engraved maps. Roberts demonstrates that the Geographia represents the moment of transition between printing and manuscript culture, while forming a critical base for the rise of modern cartography.