The Sense of Decadence in Nineteenth Century France

Most French Romantics, then, did not distinguish themselves by the intensity of their pessimism or by the ... 4 Cf. A. E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900 (Toronto, 1958), 36ff.; Cassagne, op. cit.

The Sense of Decadence in Nineteenth Century France

"It was the best oftimes. It was the worst oftimes. " The famous open ing sentence ofCharles Dickens' Tale oJ Two Cities can serve as a motto to characterize the mixture of optimism and pessimism with which a large number of nineteenth-century intellectuals viewed the con dition of their age. It is nowadays hardly necessary to accentuate the optimistic elements in the nineteenth-century view of history; many recent historians have sharply contrasted the complacency and the great expectations of the past century with the fears and anxieties rampant in our own age. It is often too readily assumed that a hundred years ago all leading thinkers as weil as the educated public were addicted to the cult of progress and ignored or minimized those trends of their times that paved the way for the catastrophes of the twentieth century. In the nineteenth century the intoxicating triumphs of modern science undeniably induced the general public to believe that pro gress was not an accident but a necessity and that evil and immo rality would gradually disappear. Yet fears, misgivings, and anxieties were not as exceptional in the nineteenth century as is often imagined. Such feelings were not restricted to a few dissenting philosophers and poets like Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, 'Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, and Nietzsche.

Decadence and Modernism in European and Russian Literature and Culture

Pennsylvania Press, 2013) Stilling, Beginning at the End, Patrick McGuinness, Poetry and Radical Politics in Fin-de-siècle France: From Anarchism to Action française (Oxford: ... The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900.

Decadence and Modernism in European and Russian Literature and Culture

Decadence and Modernism in European and Russian Literature and Culture: Aesthetics and Anxiety in the 1890s rewrites the story of early modernist literature and culture by drawing out the tensions underlying its simultaneous engagement with Decadence and Symbolism, the unsustainable combination of this world and the other. With a broadly framed literary and cultural approach, Jonathan Stone examines a shift in perspective that explodes the notion of reality and showcases the uneasy relationship between the tangible and intangible aspects of the surrounding world. Modernism quenches a growing fascination with the ephemeral and that which cannot be seen while also doubling down on the significance of the material world and finding profound meaning in the physical and the corporeal. Decadence and Symbolism complement the broader historical trajectory of the fin de siècle by affirming the novelty of a modernist mindset and offering an alternative to the empirical and positivistic atmosphere of the nineteenth century. Stone seeks to recreate a significant historical and cultural moment in the development of modernity, a moment that embraces the concept of Decadence while repurposing its aesthetic and social import to help navigate the fundamental changes that accompanied the dawn of the twentieth century.

Lateness and Modern European Literature

Understood as a reaction to the belated selfunderstanding of 'decadence'—'thwarted by his sense of decadence', ... See, for instance, A.E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900 (Toronto: University of Toronto ...

Lateness and Modern European Literature

Modern European literature has traditionally been seen as a series of attempts to assert successive styles of writing as 'new'. In this groundbreaking study, Ben Hutchinson argues that literary modernity can in fact be understood not as that which is new, but as that which is 'late'. Exploring the ways in which European literature repeatedly defines itself through a sense of senescence or epigonality, Hutchinson shows that the shifting manifestations of lateness since romanticism express modernity's continuing quest for legitimacy. With reference to a wide range of authors—from Mary Shelley, Chateaubriand, and Immermann, via Baudelaire, Henry James, and Nietzsche, to Valé©ry, Djuna Barnes, and Adorno— he combines close readings of canonical texts with historical and theoretical comparisons of numerous national contexts. Out of this broad comparative sweep emerges a taxonomy of lateness, of the diverse ways in which modern writers can be understood, in the words of Nietzsche, as 'creatures facing backwards'. Ambitious and original, Lateness and Modern European Literature offers a significant new model for understanding literary modernity.

A Baedeker of Decadence

Charting a Literary Fashion, 1884-1927 George C. Schoolfield ... In Joseph P. Strelka, ed., Literary Theory and Criticism: Festschrift for René Wellek. ... Carter, A. E. The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900.

A Baedeker of Decadence

During the final decades of the nineteenth century, a common mind-set emerged among many intellectuals--"la decadence." Many novels and novellas of the period were populated with protagonists who were fragile, refined, self-absorbed, and preoccupied with a trivially exquisite aesthetic. A Baedeker of Decadence presents thirty-two international works of literary decadence written between 1884 and 1927. George C. Schoolfield, a world authority on the decadent novel, offers an entertaining and wide-ranging commentary on this highly significant literary and cultural phenomenon. Schoolfield tracks down the symptoms of decadence in narrative works written in more than a dozen languages, providing synopses and passages in English translation to give a sense of each author's style and tone. Schoolfield throws new light on the close intellectual kinship of authors from August Strindberg to Bram Stoker to Thomas Mann, and on the ingredients, themes, motifs, and preconceptions that characterized decadent literature.

Seeds of Decadence in the Late Nineteenth Century Novel

Arthur Symons, 'The Decadent Movement in Literature', in Dramatis Personae (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, ... Another cultural view of decadence is A. E. Carter's The Idea of Decadence in French Literature: 18301900 ...

Seeds of Decadence in the Late Nineteenth Century Novel

A comparative assessment of the transmutation of a decadent mentality into an identifiable narrative style. The author examines the work of five major novelists in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and attempts to trace perplexities, perversities and combinations of excess.

Decadence a Very Short Introduction

Five Faces of Modernity: Modernism, Avant-Garde, Decadence, Kitsch, Postmodernism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1987. Carter, A. E. The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958.

Decadence  a Very Short Introduction

The history of decadent culture runs from ancient Rome to nineteenth-century Paris, Victorian London, fin de siecle Vienna, Weimar Berlin, and beyond. The decline of Rome provides the pattern for both aesthetic and social decadence, a pattern that artists and writers in the nineteenth century imitated, emulated, parodied, and otherwise manipulated for aesthetic gain. What begins as the moral condemnation of modernity in mid-nineteenth century France on the part of decadent authors such as Charles Baudelaire ends up as the perverse celebration of the pessimism that accompanies imperial decline. This delight in decline informs the rich canon of decadence that runs from Joris-Karl Huysmans's A Rebours to Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, Aubrey Beardsley's drawings, Gustav Klimt's paintings, and numerous other works. In this Very Short Introduction, David Weir explores the conflicting attitudes towards modernity present in decadent culture by examining the difference between aesthetic decadence--the excess of artifice--and social decadence, which involves excess in a variety of forms, whether perversely pleasurable or gratuitously cruel. Such contrariness between aesthetic and social decadence led some of its practitioners to substitute art for life and to stress the importance of taste over morality, a maneuver with far-reaching consequences, especially as decadence enters the realm of popular culture today. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Fictions of British Decadence

For an account of the development of ideas about Decadence in nineteenth-century France, see A. E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature 18301900 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958) and R. K. R. Thornton, ...

Fictions of British Decadence

Fictions of British Decadence is a fresh account of the emergence, development and legacy of fiction written in the era of Oscar Wilde. It examines a broad range of texts by a diverse array of Decadent writers, from familiar figures such as Ernest Dowson and John Davidson to lesser-known innovators such as Arthur Machen and M.P. Shiel.

French Vi Bibliography

Austin , L. J .: “ Carter : The Idea of decadence in French literature , 1830-1900 , " French Studies , XIV ( 1960 ) , 271-272 . [ Review of 1389 ] 1396 . * Callot : Cinq moments de la sensibilité française , " Age Nouveau , no .

French Vi Bibliography


Nordic Literature of Decadence

Sudenmorsian with the help of Donna Haraway's concept of naturecultures and a posthumanist approach. An eco-critical reading of the bog in ... The Idea of Decadence in French Literature 18301900. Toronto, CA: University of Toronto ...

Nordic Literature of Decadence

Nordic Literature of Decadence fills a gap on the map of world literature and participates in a thriving area of research by extending the investigation of broadly understood fin de siècle decadence to unexplored areas of Nordic literature, which remain practically unknown to Anglophone audiences. In the Nordic countries the new Parisian movements were seen as having caused a malicious invasion, a ‘black flood’ that was spreading over the North destroying the very foundations of Nordic national cultures. Nevertheless, the appeal of this controversial movement was irresistible to discontents and innovators, even in countries where the old moral, religious and nationalist atmosphere still retained its stranglehold and modern urban, industrial and social developments lagged behind that of the metropoles breeding this new literature and art. The Nordic countries developed their own distinctive manifestations of decadence favouring allegorical and allusive forms, local rural settings and depictions of primitive nature, coupling the philosophical underpinnings of fin-de-siècle decadence with ancient Nordic mythology and rising national movements. Nordic decadence thus became a distinctive and recognizable phenomenon, which travelled back to France and other European countries, influencing the ongoing debate on decadence as it was conducted on a global scale. Nordic Literature of Decadence discusses literature from five Nordic countries: Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Estonia and offers additional and alternative perspectives to the cosmopolitan traffic and cultural exchanges of literary decadence that have been explored so far in the English language scholarship.

Julius Zeyer

The Path to Decadence Robert B. Pynsent ... Decadent sensibility develops from the theory that civilisation is artificial and corrupt; it dwells orchidlike in ... A. E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature 1830-1900, p.

Julius Zeyer


Paul Verlaine and the Decadence 1882 90

Carter , A. E. The Idea of Decadence in French Literature , 1830-1900 . Toronto University Press , 1958 . ――― – Baudelaire et la critique française , 1868-1917 . Columbia : University of South Carolina , 1963 .

Paul Verlaine and the Decadence  1882 90


What is Symbolism

The anecdotal and picturesque books by Noel RICHARD and by Alain MERC1ER on the occultism of certain symbolists ... 1954); A. E. CARTER, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 1830-1900 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958).

What is Symbolism

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Gay and Lesbian Literary Heritage

Carter, A. E. The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 18301900. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958. Charlesworth, Barbara. Dark Passages: The Decadent Consciousness in Victorian Literature. Madison: University of Wisconsin ...

Gay and Lesbian Literary Heritage

The revised edition of The Gay and Lesbian Literary Heritage is a reader's companion to this impressive body of work. It provides overviews of gay and lesbian presence in a variety of literatures and historical periods; in-depth critical essays on major gay and lesbian authors in world literature; and briefer treatments of other topics and figures important in appreciating the rich and varied gay and lesbian literary traditions. Included are nearly 400 alphabetically arranged articles by more than 175 scholars from around the world. New articles in this volume feature authors such as Michael Cunningham, Tony Kushner, Anne Lister, Kate Millet, Jan Morris, Terrence McNally, and Sarah Waters; essays on topics such as Comedy of Manners and Autobiography; and overviews of Danish, Norwegian, Philippines, and Swedish literatures; as well as updated and revised articles and bibliographies.

Decadent Genealogies

allusions to Lombroso and Nordau, in A. E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature, 1830-1900 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958). In his chapter "Nerve Storms and Bad Heredity," Carter discusses French texts ...

Decadent Genealogies

Barbara Spackman here examines the ways in which decadent writers adopted the language of physiological illness and alteration as a figure for psychic otherness. By means of an ideological and rhetorical analysis of scientific as well as literary texts, she shows how the rhetoric of sickness provided the male decadent writer with an alibi for the occupation and appropriation of the female body.

A Gustave Flaubert Encyclopedia

decadence 97 decadence . Historiographers and writers of historical fictions who adopt an organicist view of the world often imply that the state is a macrocosm ... Carter , A. E. The Idea of Decadence in French Literature , 18301900 .

A Gustave Flaubert Encyclopedia

Gustave Flaubert is probably the most famous novelist of nineteenth-century France, and his best known work, Madame Bovary, is read in numerous comparative literature and French courses. His fiction set the standard to which other authors turned to learn their craft, and his cult of art and his unrelenting search for stylistic perfection inspired many later writers. This reference is a convenient guide to his life and work. Included are hundreds of alphabetically arranged entries for individual works, major characters, historical persons, themes, critical approaches, and other topics. Each entry is written by an expert contributor and most close with a brief bibliography.

Dictionary of Concepts in History

On the aesthetic concept of decadence see especially A. E. Carter , The Idea of Decadence in French Literature , 1830-1900 ( Toronto , 1958 ) ; Koenraad W. Swart , The Sense of Decadence in Nineteenth Century France ( The Hague , 1964 ) ...

Dictionary of Concepts in History

Identifies the development and contemporary use of the significant concepts in history.

Asymptote

Decadent confection that Rachilde must have composed him from “a literary cake mix. ... 5 A.E. Carter, The Idea of Decadence in French Literature 1830-1900 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1958), p. 100. 6Ibid., 110.

Asymptote

Asymptote: An Approach to Decadent Fiction offers a radically new approach to the psychology of Decadent creation. Rejecting traditional arguments that Decadence is a celebration of deviance and exhaustion, this study presents the fin-de-siecle novel as a transformative process, a quest for health. By allowing the writer to project into fiction unwanted traits and destructive tendencies - by permitting the playful invention of provisional identities -, Decadent creation itself becomes a dynamic act of creative regeneration. In describing the interrelationship of Decadent authors and their fictions, Asymptote uses the mathematical figure of the asymptote to show how they converge, then split apart, and grow distant. The author's approach to the facsimile selves he plays with and discards is the curve that never merges with his authorial identity. In successive chapters, this study describes the Decadents' experimentation with perversion (Huysmans's A rebours and Mendes's Zo'har), and their subsequent validation of social regulation and creative discipline. It examines magic and its appeal to fantasies of elitism and omnipotence (Peladan's Le Vice supreme and Villiers's Axel ), then shows authors embracing the values of community and service. It considers the Decadent text as a vehicle of change in which an artist ventilates fantasies of aggression and revenge (Mirbeau's Le Journal d'une femme de chambre and Rachilde's La Marquise de Sade) then employs writing as the means by which these feelings are discharged. It examines creation as a form of play, "une alienation grace a laquelle l'esprit se recupere sous la forme des autres" (Schwob's Vies imaginaires and Lorrain's Histoires de masques), yet notes the Decadents' decision to return to a single generative center. Finally, it examines creation as an expression of artistic transience and failure, yet shows the Decadents' success in commemorating the very forces of disintegration (Rodenbach's L'Art en exil). In considering the Decadents' insistence on subjectivism and aloneness, this study concludes (Gourmont's Sixtine) by showing their wish to escape the prison of identity and to redefine their art as cooperative creation.