The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France

In the late 1980s feminist theorists, literary critics and historians began to reassess the categories of man, woman, sex and gender identities and in 1989 scholars established the Journal of Women's History as well as the journal ...

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France provides the first comprehensive comparison of the printed debates in the 1500s over the superiority or inferiority of woman - the Querelle des femmes - and the dignity and misery of man. Analysing these writings side by side, Lyndan Warner reveals the extent to which Renaissance authors borrowed commonplaces from both traditions as they praised or blamed man or woman and habitually considered opposite and contrary points of view. In the law courts reflections on the virtues and vices of man and woman had a practical application-to win cases-and as Warner demonstrates, Parisian lawyers employed this developing rhetoric in family disputes over inheritance and marriage, and amplified it in the published versions of their pleadings. Tracing these ideas and modes of thinking from the writer's quill to the workshops and boutiques of printers and booksellers, Warner uses probate inventories to follow the books to the households of their potential male and female readers. Warner reveals the shifts in printed discussions of human nature from the 1500s to the early 1600s and shows how booksellers adapted the ways they marketed and sold new genres such as essays and lawyers' pleadings.

The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France

Series Editors: allyson Poska, The University of mary Washington, Usa abby Zanger The study of women and gender offers ... The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France Print, Rhetoric, and Law lyndan Warner The Dynamics of Gender in ...

The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France

In its six case studies, The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France works out a model for (early modern) gender, which is articulated in the introduction. The book comprises essays on the construction of women: three in texts by male and three by female writers, including Racine, Fénelon, Poulain de la Barre, in the first part; La Guette, La Fayette and Sévigné, in the second. These studies thus also take up different genres: satire, tragedy and treatise; memoir, novella and letter-writing. Since gender is a relational construct, each chapter considers as well specific textual and contextual representations of men. In every instance, Stanton looks for signs of conformity to-and deviations from-normative gender scripts. The Dynamics of Gender adds a new dimension to early modern French literary and cultural studies: it incorporates a dynamic (shifting) theory of gender, and it engages both contemporary critical theory and literary historical readings of primary texts and established concepts in the field. This book emphasizes the central importance of historical context and close reading from a feminist perspective, which it also interrogates as a practice. The Afterword examines some of the meanings of reading-as-a-feminist.

Gendering the Renaissance Commonwealth

politics, and culture pivoted in early modern France.9 Sarah Hanley, most prominently, has repeatedly argued that the ... 2000); Lyndan Warner, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law (Farnham, 2011).

Gendering the Renaissance Commonwealth

This pioneering and innovative study challenges modern assumptions of what constitutes the political and the public in Renaissance thought. Offering gendered readings of a wide array of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century political thinkers, with a particular focus on the two prime thinkers of the early modern state, Niccol- Machiavelli and Jean Bodin, Anna Becker reconstructs a neglected but important classical tradition in political thought. Exploring how 'the political' was incorporated into a wide array of 'private' or 'apolitical' topics by early modern thinkers, Becker demonstrates how both republican and absolutist thinkers - the two poles which organise early modern political thought - relied on gendered justifications. In doing so, she reveals how the foundations of the modern state were significantly shaped by gendered concerns.

Rewriting Arthurian Romance in Renaissance France

... Lyndan, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law (Farnham and Burlington, Vt, 2011) weinberg, Bernard, Critical Prefaces of the French Renaissance (evanston, iL, 1950) wellisch, hans h., ...

Rewriting Arthurian Romance in Renaissance France

First comprehensive examination of the ways in which printers, publishers and booksellers adapted and rewrote Arthurian romance in early modern France, for new audiences and in new forms.

Pathologies of Love

Medicine and the Woman Question in Early Modern France Judy Kem. Thiry, Claude. “Rhétoriqueurs de Bourgogne ... In The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law, 93–119. Farnham UK: Ashgate, 2011.

Pathologies of Love

Pathologies of Love examines the role of medicine in the debate on women, known as the querelle des femmes, in early modern France. Questions concerning women’s physical makeup and its psychological and moral consequences played an integral role in the querelle. This debate on the status of women and their role in society began in the fifteenth century and continued through the sixteenth and, as many critics would say, well beyond. In querelle works early modern medicine, women’s sexual difference, literary reception, and gendered language often merge. Literary authors perpetuated medical ideas such as the notion of allegedly fatal lovesickness, and physicians published works that included disquisitions on the moral nature of women. In Pathologies of Love, Judy Kem looks at the writings of Christine de Pizan, Jean Molinet, Symphorien Champier, Jean Lemaire de Belges, and Marguerite de Navarre, examining the role of received medical ideas in the querelle des femmes. She reconstructs how these authors interpreted the traditional courtly understanding of women’s pity or mercy on a dying lover, their understanding of contemporary debates about women’s supposed sexual insatiability and its biological effects on men’s lives and fertility, and how erotomania or erotic melancholy was understood as a fatal illness. While the two women who frame this study defended women and based much of what they wrote on personal experience, the three men appealed to male authority and tradition in their writings.

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Gender in Debate from the Early Middle Ages to the Renaissance (New York, Palgrave, 2002) and Lyndan Warner, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law (Aldershot, Ashgate, 2011).

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

This fourth edition of Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks's prize-winning survey features significant changes to every chapter, designed to reflect the newest scholarship. Global issues have been threaded throughout the book, while still preserving the clear thematic structure of previous editions. Thus readers will find expanded discussions of gendered racial hierarchies, migration, missionaries, and consumer goods. In addition, there is enhanced coverage of recent theoretical directions; the ideas, beliefs, and practices of ordinary people; early industrialization; women's learning, letter writing, and artistic activities; emotions and sentiments; single women and same-sex relations; masculinities; mixed-race and enslaved women; and the life course from birth to death. With geographically broad coverage, including Russia, Scandinavia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Iberian Peninsula, this remains the leading text on women and gender in Europe in this period. Accompanying this essential reading is a completely revised website featuring extensive updated bibliographies, web links, and primary source material.

Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature

Series Editors: Allyson Poska, The University of Mary Washington, USA Abby Zanger The study of women and gender offers some of the most ... France Mastering Memory Faith E. Beasley The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France Print,

Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature

Although attention to the Book of Judith and its heroine has grown in recent years, this is the first full-length study to focus on adaptations of the Bible’s Old Testament Book of Judith across a range of literary genres written in French during the early modern era. Author Kathleen Llewellyn bases her analysis on references to Judith in a number of early modern sermons as well as the ’Judith’ texts of four early modern writers. The texts include two theatrical dramas, Le Mystère de Judith et Holofernés (c. 1500), believed to have been written by Jean Molinet, and Le Miroir des vefves: Tragédie sacrée d'Holoferne & Judith by Pierre Heyns (1596), as well as two epic poems, La Judit (1574) by Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas, and Gabrielle de Coignard’s Imitation de la victoire de Judich (1594). Llewellyn’s goal is to see Judith as she was envisioned by early modern French writers and their readers, and to understand how the sixteenth century shaped their view of the heroine. Noting aspects of that story that were emphasized by sixteenth-century authors, as well as elements that those writers altered to suit their purposes, she also examines the ways in which writers of this era made use of Judith’s story as a means to explore interests and concerns of early modern writers, readers, and spectators. Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature provides a deeper understanding of early modern ideas regarding the role of women, the use of exemplary stories in preaching and teaching, theories of vision, and the importance of community in Renaissance France.

Villainy in France 1463 1610

Viala , Alain , La France galante : essai historique sur une catégorie culturelle , de ses origines jusqu'à la Révolution ( Paris : Presses Universitaires de ... Warner , Lyndan , The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France : Print ...

Villainy in France  1463 1610

Obscene poetry, servants' slanders against their masters, the diabolical acts of those who committed massacre and regicide. This is a book about the harmful, outward manifestation of inner malice—villainy—in French culture (1463-1610). In pre-modern France, villainous offences were countered, if never fully contained, by intersecting legal and literary responses. Combining the methods of legal anthropology with literary and historical analysis, this study examines villainy across juridical documents, criminal records, and literary texts. Whilst few people obtained justice through the law, many pursued out-of-court settlements of one kind or another. Literary texts commemorated villainies both fictitious and historical; literature sometimes instantiated the process of redress, and enabled the transmission of conflicts from one context to another. Villainy in France follows this overflowing current of pre-modern French culture, examining its impact within France and across the English Channel. Scholars and cultural critics of the Anglophone world have long been fascinated by villainy and villains. This book reveals the subject's significant 'Frenchness' and establishes a transcultural approach to it in law and literature. In this study, villainy's particular significance emerges through its representation in authors remembered for their less-than respectable, even criminal, activities: François Villon, Clément Marot, François Rabelais, Pierre de L'Estoile, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, John Marston, and George Chapman. Villainy in France affords legal-literary comparison of these authors alongside many of their lesser-known contemporaries; in so doing, it reinterprets French conflicts within a wider European context, from the mid-fifteenth century to the early seventeenth century.

Born to Write

Warner, Lyndan, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law [2011] (London and New York: Routledge, 2016). Weber, Henri, La Création poétique au XVI° siècle en France de Maurice Scève à Agrippa d'Aubigné ...

Born to Write

It is easy to forget how deeply embedded in social hierarchy was the literature and learning that has come down to us from the early modern European world. From fiction to philosophy, from poetry to history, works of all kinds emerged from and through the social hierarchy that was a fundamental fact of everyday life. Paying attention to it changes how we might understand and interpret the works themselves, whether canonical and familiar or largely forgotten. But a second, related fact is much overlooked too: works also often emanated from families, not just from individuals. Families were driving forces in the production—that is, in the composing, editing, translating, or publishing—of countless works. Relatives collaborated with each other, edited each other, or continued the unfinished works of deceased family members; some imitated or were inspired by the works of long-dead relatives. The reason why this second fact (about families) is connected to the first (about social hierarchy) is that families were in the period a basic social medium through which social status was claimed, maintained, threatened, or lost. So producing literary works was one of the many ways in which families claimed their place in the social world. The process was however often fraught, difficult, or disappointing. If families created works as a form of socio-cultural legacy that might continue to benefit their future members, not all members benefited equally; women sometimes produced or claimed the legacy for themselves, but they were often sidelined from it. Relatives sometimes disagreed bitterly about family history, identity (not least religious), and so about the picture of themselves and their family that they wished to project more widely in society through their written works, whether printed or manuscript. So although family was a fundamental social medium out of which so many works emerged, that process could be conflictual as well as harmonious. The intertwined role of family and social hierarchy within literary production is explored in this book through the case of France, from the late fifteenth to the mid-seventeenth century. Some families are studied here in detail, such as that of the most widely read French poet of the age, Clément Marot. But the extent of this phenomenon is quantified too: some two hundred families are identified as each containing more than one literary producer, and in the case of one family an extraordinary twenty-seven.

Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France

1: Government, Gender and the Female Prince in Seventeenth-Century France (New York: Palgrave, 2016), 1–6 and 34–44. 2. ... see Lyndan Warner, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), passim, and esp.

Towards an Equality of the Sexes in Early Modern France

This volume sets out to examine the ways in which an equality between the sexes is constructed, conceptualised, imagined or realised in early modern France, a period and a country which produced some of the earliest theorisations on equality. In so doing, it aims to contribute towards the development of the history of equality as an intellectual category within the history of political thought, and to situate "the woman question" within that history. The eleven chapters in the volume span the fields of political theory, philosophy, literature, history and history of ideas, bringing together literary scholars, historians, philosophers and scholars of political thought, and examining an extensive range of primary sources. Whilst most of the chapters focus on the conceptualisation of a moral, metaphysical or intellectual equality between the sexes, space is also given to concrete examples of a de facto gender equality in operation. The volume is aimed at scholars and graduate students of political thought, history of philosophy, women’s history and gender studies alike. It aims to throw light on the history of Western ideas of equality and difference, questions which continue to preoccupy cultural historians, philosophers, political theorists and feminist critics.

Anna Maria van Schurman The Star of Utrecht

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric, and Law. Farnham: Ashgate. Webster, Charles. 1970. Samuel Hartlib and the Advancement of Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Anna Maria van Schurman   The Star of Utrecht

Dutch Golden Age scholar Anna Maria van Schurman was widely regarded throughout the seventeenth century as the most learned woman of her age. She was 'The Star of Utrecht','The Dutch Minerva','The Tenth Muse', 'a miracle of her sex', 'the incomparable Virgin', and 'the oracle of Utrecht'. As the first woman ever to attend a university, she was also the first to advocate, boldly, that women should be admitted into universities. A brilliant linguist, she mastered some fifteen languages. She was the first Dutch woman to seek publication of her correspondence. Her letters in several languages Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and French – to the intellectual men and women of her time reveal the breadth of her interests in theology, philosophy, medicine, literature, numismatics, painting, sculpture, embroidery, and instrumental music. This study addresses Van Schurman's transformative contribution to the seventeenth-century debate on women's education. It analyses, first, her educational philosophy; and, second, the transnational reception of her writings on women's education, particularly in France. Anne Larsen explores how, in advocating advanced learning for women, Van Schurman challenged the educational establishment of her day to allow women to study all the arts and the sciences. Her letters offer fascinating insights into the challenges that scholarly women faced in the early modern period when they sought to define themselves as intellectuals, writers, and thoughtful contributors to the social good.

Queer re readings in the French Renaissance

Reading works of Renaissance literature against their ancient classical sources, this book examines representations of homosexuality in sixteenth-century France and stresses the historical coexistence of different models of homosexuality.

Queer  re readings in the French Renaissance

Reading works of Renaissance literature against their ancient classical sources, this book examines representations of homosexuality in sixteenth-century France and stresses the historical coexistence of different models of homosexuality. The texts and topics covered include the Decameron and its translation and reception in France, the poetry of Ronsard, Montaigne's Essais, works in praise of and satirising Henri III, Brantôme's Dames galantes, and the figures of the androgyne and the hermaphrodite.

Queens and Mistresses of Renaissance France

While Anne of Brittany's court had a circle of devout women, it was not a venue where men and women enjoyed each other's company. Francis's distinctively Renaissance court appreciated women and made them central to its activities.

Queens and Mistresses of Renaissance France

Tells the history of the French Renaissance through the lives of its most prominent queens and mistresses.

Foragers Farmers and Fossil Fuels

Menches, Komogrammateus of Kerkeosiris: The Doings of a Village Scribe in the Late Ptolemaic Period (120–110 BC). Leiden: E.J. Brill. Vermeij, Geerat. 2010. ... The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, ...

Foragers  Farmers  and Fossil Fuels

The best-selling author of Why the West Rules—for Now examines the evolution and future of human values Most people in the world today think democracy and gender equality are good, and that violence and wealth inequality are bad. But most people who lived during the 10,000 years before the nineteenth century thought just the opposite. Drawing on archaeology, anthropology, biology, and history, Ian Morris explains why. Fundamental long-term changes in values, Morris argues, are driven by the most basic force of all: energy. Humans have found three main ways to get the energy they need—from foraging, farming, and fossil fuels. Each energy source sets strict limits on what kinds of societies can succeed, and each kind of society rewards specific values. But if our fossil-fuel world favors democratic, open societies, the ongoing revolution in energy capture means that our most cherished values are very likely to turn out not to be useful any more. Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels offers a compelling new argument about the evolution of human values, one that has far-reaching implications for how we understand the past—and for what might happen next. Originating as the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, the book includes challenging responses by classicist Richard Seaford, historian of China Jonathan Spence, philosopher Christine Korsgaard, and novelist Margaret Atwood.

Women Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France

However, her characterization of the distance separating women from men as an empty space points to a question mark in the ... The Idea of Perfect History: Historical Erudition and Historical Philosophy in Renaissance France (Urbana: ...

Women  Imagination and the Search for Truth in Early Modern France

Grounded in medical, juridical, and philosophical texts of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century France, this innovative study tells the story of how the idea of woman contributed to the emergence of modern science. Rebecca Wilkin focuses on the contradictory representations of women from roughly the middle of the sixteenth century to the middle of the seventeenth, and depicts this period as one filled with epistemological anxiety and experimentation. She shows how skeptics, including Montaigne, Marie de Gournay, and Agrippa von Nettesheim, subverted gender hierarchies and/or blurred gender difference as a means of questioning the human capacity to find truth; while "positivists" who strove to establish new standards of truth, for example Johann Weyer, Jean Bodin, and Guillaume du Vair, excluded women from the search for truth. The book constitutes a reevaluation of the legacy of Cartesianism for women, as Wilkin argues that Descartes' opening of the search for truth "even to women" was part of his appropriation of skeptical arguments. This book challenges scholars to revise deeply held notions regarding the place of women in the early modern search for truth, their role in the development of rational thought, and the way in which intellectuals of the period dealt with the emergence of an influential female public.

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

'Women, “Usury” and Credit in Early Modern England: The Case of the Maiden Investor', Gender & History (2015). ... Cavallo and wrote as single author The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France: Print, Rhetoric and Law (2011).

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe is a comprehensive and ground-breaking survey of the lives of women in early-modern Europe between 1450 and 1750. Covering a period of dramatic political and cultural change, the book challenges the current contours and chronologies of European history by observing them through the lens of female experience. The collaborative research of this book covers four themes: the affective world; practical knowledge for life; politics and religion; arts, science and humanities. These themes are interwoven through the chapters, which encompass all areas of women’s lives: sexuality, emotions, health and wellbeing, educational attainment, litigation and the practical and leisured application of knowledge, skills and artistry from medicine to theology. The intellectual lives of women, through reading and writing, and their spirituality and engagement with the material world, are also explored. So too is the sheer energy of female work, including farming and manufacture, skilled craft and artwork, theatrical work and scientific enquiry. The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe revises the chronological and ideological parameters of early-modern European history by opening the reader’s eyes to an exciting age of female productivity, social engagement and political activism across European and transatlantic boundaries. It is essential reading for students and researchers of early-modern history, the history of women and gender studies.

Encyclopedia of Women in the Renaissance

Italy, France, and England Diana Maury Robin, Anne R. Larsen, Carole Levin ... Male Midwifery Throughout the early modern period, female midwives governed the birthing chamber, inviting men to assist at deliveries after days of ...

Encyclopedia of Women in the Renaissance

Presents biographical and topical information on the contributions made by women during the Renaissance in such fields as medicine, religion, and art.

Caroline Drama

result, so accepted had the idea of women actors become by this time that the Restoration theatres opened with ... by women, which involved the establishments of various salons in Renaissance France where like-minded people, men and ...

Caroline Drama

Caroline Drama takes as its focus the public theatre playwriting of Philip Massinger, John Ford, James Shirley and Richard Brome between 1625 and 1642. It brings into clear focus for those unfamiliar with these playwrights a neglected period of writing. Setting their plays within a social and political context, Julie Sanders reveals their concern with issues of community and hierarchy in the decades leading up to the English Civil Wars. By exploring a range of plays of each writer, she explores both their continuities and their differences, as well as examining their particular choices of subject matter, language, and theatrical strategy. The value of Caroline Drama as a whole becomes clear as a result of this study.

Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France

It included a selection of Lucian's works translated by one or the other of the men as well as several of their own treatises ... en France à l'époque de la Renaissance [1500–1600],” in Revue de l'histoire littéraire de la France 3, no.

Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France

Today the friendships that grab people’s imaginations are those that reach across inequalities of class and race. The friendships that seem to have exerted an analogous level of fascination in early modern France were those that defied the assumption, inherited from Aristotle and patristic sources, that friendships between men and women were impossible. Together, the essays in Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France tell the story of the declining intelligibility of classical models of (male) friendship and of the rising prominence of women as potential friends. The revival of Plato’s friendship texts in the sixteenth century challenged Aristotle’s rigid ideal of perfect friendship between men. In the seventeenth century, a new imperative of heterosociality opened a space for the cultivation of cross-gender friendships, while the spiritual friendships of the Catholic Reformation modeled relationships that transcended the gendered dynamics of galanterie. Men and Women Making Friends in Early Modern France argues that the imaginative experimentation in friendships between men and women was a distinctive feature of early modern French culture. The ten essays in this volume address friend-making as a process that is creative of self and responsive to changing social and political circumstances. Contributors reveal how men and women fashioned gendered selves, and also circumvented gender norms through concrete friendship practices. By showing that the benefits and the risks of friendship are magnified when gender roles and relations are unsettled, the essays in this volume highlight the relevance of early modern friend-making to friendship in the contemporary world.

Gender Rhetoric and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing

While neither ancient Greeks, Romans, nor Renaissance French acknowledged it as a condition distinct from heterosexuality, all three had names for persons who practiced same-sex acts, most of which, however, applied to men rather than ...

Gender  Rhetoric  and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing

In this book Floyd Gray explores how the treatment of controversial subjects in French Renaissance writing was affected both by rhetorical conventions and by the commercial requirements of an expanding publishing industry. Focusing on a wide range of discourses on gender issues - misogynist, feminist, autobiographical, homosexual and medical - Gray reveals the extent to which these marginalized texts reflect literary concerns rather than social reality. He then moves from a close analysis of the rhetorical factor in the Querelle des femmes to consider ways in which writing, as a textual phenomenon, inscribes its own, sometimes ambiguous, meaning. Gray offers richly detailed readings of writing by Rabelais, Jean Flore, Montaigne, Louise Labé, Pernette du Guillet and Marie de Gournay among others, challenging the inherent anachronism of those forms of criticism that fail to take account of the rhetorical and cultural conditions of the period.