The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences

This book is a valuable source of information for biologists, chemical biologists, scientists, and students.

The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences

The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences focuses on the structure, function, and synthesis of proteins. This book examines the various approaches on how amino acids are polymerized in vitro, which involves the physical, chemical, immunological, enzymologic, biosynthetic, and organic synthetic techniques. Comprised of five parts encompassing 27 chapters, this book starts with an overview of Christian B. Anfinsen’s role in the development of protein chemistry and the training of scientists who have advanced their experiences in his laboratory to pioneer in the field of biological and medical sciences. This text then examines the synthesis of albumin molecule in the bloodstream as it carries cystine, hematin, bilirubin, fatty acids, and aromatic compounds. Other chapters discuss the kinetic experiments of hydrogen exchange in aqueous solution between peptide molecules and solvent water. This text also introduces the reader to the lipoprotein–atherosclerosis connection by studying the metabolism of plasma lipoproteins. This book is a valuable source of information for biologists, chemical biologists, scientists, and students.

Biomedical Applications of Natural Proteins

This book is intended as a reference guide for graduate students, postgraduate students and researchers with a basic knowledge of protein chemistry who would like to know more about the biomedical applications of natural proteins to promote ...

Biomedical Applications of Natural Proteins

This book is intended as a reference guide for graduate students, postgraduate students and researchers with a basic knowledge of protein chemistry who would like to know more about the biomedical applications of natural proteins to promote healthier lives. The book is divided into ten chapters, each of which explains different natural proteins and their established biomedical applications. The first chapter extensively deals with protein based natural fibers and provides an overview of all protein based fibers currently available. In turn, chapter two mainly focuses on the biomedical applications of a special class of proteins called Heat Shock Proteins; the biomedical applications of silkworm pupae proteins are dealt in chapter three. Chapter four examines an interesting use of Eri silk fibroin as a biomaterial for Tissue Engineering, while chapter five discusses the key experimental details involved in converting Tasar silk sericin into self-assembled nanoparticles. Chapter six offers brief descriptions of bioactive proteins with respect to their sources, synthesis and applications. Chapter seven is dedicated to Interleukine-8 and its role in human life, while chapter eight addresses the importance of natural proteins in infectious diseases. Chapter nine explores the issue of excess intake of dietary proteins and its adverse effects, and finally, chapter ten discusses the efficiency of drug delivery systems made up of gelatin nanocomposites. The book is above all intended as a valuable resource for students and researchers alike, sparking their curiosity with regard to the applications of natural proteins and motivating them to focus their own energies on the discovery or identification of additional natural proteins for diverse biomedical uses.

Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography

3292 Dean , A. , and Goldberger , R.F. ( Eds . ) : The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences . New York , Academic , 1984 , 415 pp . 3282. Fordis , C. M. , Anagnou , N. P. , Dean , A. , Nienhuis , A. W. , and Schechter ...

Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography


Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography

Chaiken , I. M .: The chemical basis of folding and function : from nucleases to neurophysins . In Schechter , A. N. , et al . ( Eds . ) : The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences . New York , Academic , 1983 , pp .

Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography

Each issue lists papers published during the preceding year.

Bioconjugation

Written by two leading experts in the field, Bioconjugation offers invaluable guidance for the design of protein conjugates of all types, covering the coupling of proteins to organic molecules, nucleic acids and solid phases as well as ...

Bioconjugation

Written by two leading experts in the field, Bioconjugation offers invaluable guidance for the design of protein conjugates of all types, covering the coupling of proteins to organic molecules, nucleic acids and solid phases as well as other proteins. Its comprehensive coverage saves time by bringing together information previously available only form a wide variety of sources. An essential reference for college and university libraries supporting research in biochemistry, immunology and medicine.

Information Sources in Biotechnology

Harper's Review of Biochemistry, D. W. Martin, P. A. Mayes and W. W. Rodwell (Lange Medical Publications, 1981). Eighteenth edition of this general textbook. The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences, A. N. Schecter, ...

Information Sources in Biotechnology


Protides of the Biological Fluids

Table II Biological Activity of Native and Open Chain CT Peptide Hypocalcemic Activity Adenylate Cyclase (I.U. /mg) (-Log ... Int. J. Pept. and Protein Res. ... In: The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences (eds.

Protides of the Biological Fluids

Protides of the Biological Fluids examines protides of the biological fluids and covers topics ranging from the use of DNA probes to diagnose inherited diseases and receptors to the conformation and function of biologically active peptides. This text has 115 chapters and begins by demonstrating the existence of gene families common to several vertebrates and which evolved by intragenic duplication. The chapters that follow focus on the use of DNA probes in the analysis of inherited disorders such as thalassemia and hemophilia. The reader is then introduced to receptors, especially for peptides. Receptors on circulating cells, hormone receptors, receptors involved in cancer, and immunoglobulin receptors are explored. The section on the conformation and function of biologically active peptides considers the methods including spectroscopic methods, crystallography, and theoretical conformational analysis. In particular, the use of synchrotron X-radiation in biological crystallography and of 2D NMR spectroscopy in the identification of folded structures in immunogenic peptides is highlighted. This book will be of value to biologists and biochemists.

National Library of Medicine Current Catalog

Mobility and migration of biological molecules / organized and edited by P.B. Garland and R.J.P. Williams . ... PSEUDOMONAS INFECTIONS CONGRESSES CONGRESSES The Impact of protein chemistry on the biomedical sciences / edited by Alan N.

National Library of Medicine Current Catalog


Electromagnetic Fields and Biomembranes

E. Heinz, "Electric Potentials in Biological Membrane Transport", Springer W., Heidelberg (1981) H. Morowitz, "Foundations of ... of protein", Academic Press, N.Y. (1975) "The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences", ...

Electromagnetic Fields and Biomembranes

The First International School on "Electromagnetic Fields and Biomembranes" took place in Pleven, Bulgaria on 6-12 October 1986. It was designed as an advanced course through a collaboration of the Biological Faculty of Sofia University and the Council of the Bioelectrochemical Society. In an advanced course the lecturers are specialized in particular areas, and the students are usually specialists in related areas. We have captured the expertise of both groups of participants in this volume. The longer papers prepared by the lecturers are joined with the shorter papers based on the posters presented by the "students" to provide a summary of the school as well as an indication of current research directions in the field. The course was designed to provide the latest information about biomembrane structure and function, covering the properties of both the lipid matrix and the recently characterized proteins that function as specialized channels and receptors. Real membranes and various models were covered, with an emphasis on understanding their mechanisms of interaction with various exogenous stimuli (e.g., electric, magnetic, light, etc.). Several practical applications of this information (e.g., electroporation, electro-fusion) were also presented with indications of the possibilities for new developments in biotechnology. The mixture of basic science with practical applications, together with the int~rmingling of lecturers and students from many different countries produced a stimulating atmosphere and effective teaching. We hope that this volume will transmit some of this atmosphere.

Lipoproteins Apolipoproteins and Lipases

Peters, T., Jr. (1980). "Serum Albumin-An Overview and Bibliography." Miles Laboratories, Elkhart, IN. Peters, T., Jr. (1984). In “The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences" (A. N. Schecter and R. F. Goldberger, eds.) ...

Lipoproteins  Apolipoproteins  and Lipases

This volume contains eight chapters that present both new and reviewed information fundamental to a clear understanding of lipid catabolism and transport at the molecular level. Three-dimensional structures of important serum lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and lipases, utilizing X-ray data when available, are emphasized, and an attempt is made to relate structures to function. Amphipathic helix Apolipoprotein E Lipophorin Structure of serum albumin Lipid binding proteins Apolipoprotein B Low-density lipoprotein

Peptides as Immunogens

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 81:2489—2493 Arnon R (1984) Antigenic determinants of proteins and synthetic vaccines. In: Schechter AN, Dean A, Goldberger RF (eds) Impact of protein chemistry on the biomedical sciences. Academic, Orlando, p 187 ...

Peptides as Immunogens

The humoral response of the immune system to a foreign antigen usually requires the recognition of two antigenic determinants. The one, called the carrier, is recognized by T-Iymphocytes, the other, called the hapten, by B-Iympho cytes. As a consequence, T - and B-Iymphocytes proliferate, B-Iymphocytes produce hapten-specific antibodies, and the system develops memory to the antigens. It was long thought that antigens would form a bridge to mediate the cooperation of T - and B-Iymphocytes. However, it now appears that antigens are broken down to fragments which then act as carrier determinants for T -lymphocytes. The cells which originally process antigen are called an tigen-presenting cells. They have phagocytic properties. They can take up and degrade antigens, in the case of pro teins to peptides. The peptides of protein antigens reappear on the surface of the antigen-presenting cells, where they must become associated with membrane proteins encoded by genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in order to be recognized by T-Iymphocytes. To activate helper T-Iym phocytes which cooperate in antibody responses, MHC class II molecules have to be expressed on the surface of the antigen-presenting cells. Once T -lymphocytes have be come activated, they are ready to cooperate with B cells.

Ivory Bridges

In The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences , ed . A. Schechter et al . Academic Press . Omenn , G. S. 1985. Basic research as an investment in the future . American Journal of Roentgenology 145 : 1109-1112 .

Ivory Bridges

A study of two bridges between science and society: governmental science policy and scientists' voluntary public-interest associations. According to a widespread stereotype, scientists occupy an ivory tower, isolated from other parts of society. To some extent this is true, and the resulting freedom to pursue curiosity-driven research has made possible extraordinary scientific advances. The spinoffs of "pure" science, however, have also had powerful impacts on society, and the potential for future impacts is even greater. The public and many policymakers, as well as many researchers, have paid insufficient attention to the mechanisms for interchange between science and society that have developed since World War II. Ivory Bridges examines two such mechanisms: governmental science policy (often involving the participation of "scientist administrators") and scientists' voluntary public-interest associations. The examination of science policy is guided by the notion of "Jeffersonian science"—-defined as basic research on topics identified as being in the national interest. The book illustrates the concept with a historical case study of the Press-Carter Initiative of the late 1970s and proposes that a Jeffersonian approach would make a valuable addition to future science policy. The book also looks at the activities of citizen-scientists who have organized themselves to promote the welfare of society. It shows that their numerous and diverse organizations have made major contributions to the commonweal and that they have helped to prevent science from becoming either too subservient to government or too autonomous. An extensive appendix profiles a wide variety of these organizations.

Chemically Modified Surfaces in Science and Industry

( 1984 ) in The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences ( Schecter , A.N. , Dean , A. and Goldberger , R.F. , eds . ) , p . 44 , Academic Press , Inc. , New York . J. Kohn and M. Wilchek . ( 1982 ) Biochem . and Biophys .

Chemically Modified Surfaces in Science and Industry

First published in 1988. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Transposable Elements and Genome Evolution

Rearranging views on neurogenesis: Neuronal death in the absence of DNA end-joining proteins. ... 137–157 in The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences, edited by A.N. Schechter, A. Dan & R.F. Goldberger.

Transposable Elements and Genome Evolution

Once considered merely `selfish' or `parasitic' DNA, transposable elements are today recognized as being of major biological significance. Not only are these elements a major source of mutation, they have contributed both directly and indirectly to the evolution of genome structure and function. On October 8-10, 1999, 100 molecular biologists and evolutionists representing 11 countries met on the campus of The University of Georgia in Athens for the inaugural Georgia Genetics Symposium. The topics of presentations ranged from how the elements themselves have evolved to the impact transposable elements have had on the evolution of their host genomes. The papers in this volume therefore represent state-of-the-art thinking, by leading world experts in the field, on the evolutionary significance of transposable elements.

Host Defense Dysfunction in Trauma Shock and Sepsis

Science 219:1329–1330 Steinberg D (1984) Lipoproteins and atherosclerosis: a problem in cell biology. In: Scheschter AN, Dean A, Goldberger RF (eds) The impact of protein chemistry on the biomedical sciences.

Host Defense Dysfunction in Trauma  Shock and Sepsis

This book presents a unique overview of all aspects of host defense alterations under stressful conditions. It is based on the most important contributions given at the "2nd International Congress on the Immune Consequences of Trauma, Shock, and Sepsis-Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches," which was held in Munich under the auspices of the most distinguished scientific societies involved in this field (Society of Critical Care Medicine, European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Societe Internationale de Chirurgie, Surgical Infection Society, Surgical Infection Society Europe, European Society for Surgical Research, International Society for Burn Injury, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, and National Institutes of Health). Since the first conference of this kind in 1988, new information from basic studies and clinical trials has provided exciting and novel insights into the immune dysfunctions accom panying trauma, shock, and sepsis. The volume is divided into 18 parts presenting the structural background of trauma-induced alterations of immune and imflammatory mechanisms as well as the currently discussed therapeutic interventions designed to restore or maintain normal host defenses following major injury. Introducing the general theme of the book is a summary of the essential keystones of trauma and sepsis-related immune deficits. Discussions of the progress in trauma care brought through better understanding of the cell biology of injury and of the major clinical factors that influence host defense integrity in operative medicine provide a setting for understanding the wide array of detailed information that is presented thereafter.

Current Catalog

CONGRESSES Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation --Page facing t.p. Includes bibliographies and index . ... 8403212 -- BIOSYNTHESIS - COLLECTED WORKS The Impact of protein chemistry on the biomedical sciences | edited by Alan N.

Current Catalog

First multi-year cumulation covers six years: 1965-70.

Bioactive Peptides Produced by Limited Proteolysis

The Impact of Protein Chemistry on the Biomedical Sciences. Academic Press, Inc., NY. [65] Nguyen G, Delarue F, Burcklé C, Bouzhir L, Giller T, Sraer JD (2002). Pivotal role of the renin/prorenin receptor in angiotensin II production ...

Bioactive Peptides Produced by Limited Proteolysis

Proteins are considered supremely important for the organization, survival, and functioning of living organisms. They were considered stable and static molecules until the early 1940s, when RudolphSchoenheimer demonstrated that proteins exist in a constant dynamic process of synthesis and degradation (proteostasis), absolutely essential for life. Since then, general and limited protein degradation became some of the most fascinating aspects of biological sciences. This book is focused on a particular aspect of protein degradation, namely, limited proteolysis, which gives rise to bioactive peptides as a result of the enzymatic action of proteinases and peptidases, which are enzymes that hydrolyze specific peptide bonds of proteins and peptides, respectively. In a broad sense, bioactive peptides are any fragment of endogenous or exogenous proteins able to elicit either physiological or pathological activities. Here, we aim at presenting to the readers that bioactive peptides are not merely produced through random processes during protein degradation, but rather through a well-organized enzymatic process that is deeply integrated in the homeostatic processes of living organisms. Table of Contents: Overview and Historical Background / Bioactive Peptides Produced by Extracellular Proteolysis / Bioactive Peptides Generated by Intracellular Proteolysis / Proteolytic Enzymes / Concluding Remarks / References / Author Biographies

The Evolution from Protein Chemistry to Proteomics

Chakravarti, D.N., From the decline and fall of protein chemistry to proteomics, BioTechniques, 2, Suppl. March 2002. Marshall, T. and Williams, K.M., Proteomics and its impact upon biomedical science, Brit. J. Biomed.

The Evolution from Protein Chemistry to Proteomics

Largely driven by major improvements in the analytical capability of mass spectrometry, proteomics is being applied to broader areas of experimental biology, ranging from oncology research to plant biology to environmental health. However, while it has already eclipsed solution protein chemistry as a discipline, it is still essentially an extension

Gene Expression and Cell Cell Interactions in the Developing Nervous System

J. Plescia and W. Braun, eds. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 614-643. Dreyer, W. J. (1984). Molecular evolution antibody formation and embryogenesis. In: "The Impact of Protein Chemistry on The Biomedical Sciences," A. N. Schechter, ...

Gene Expression and Cell Cell Interactions in the Developing Nervous System

The dramatic advances in molecular genetics are becoming incorporated into neurobiologic studies at an ever increasing rate. In developmental neurobiology, the importance of cell cell interactions for neurogenesis and gene expression is be ginning to be understood in terms of the molecular bases for these interactions. This book seeks to emphasize the importance of molecular technology in the study of neurogenetic mechanisms and to explore the possible relationships between specific cell cell interactions and regulated gene expression in the develop ing nervous ~stem. This volume consists of nineteen chapters which address ques tions of gene expression and the importance of cell-cell interac tions as key factors in the developing nervous ~stem. Rather than viewing these two processes as separate mechanisms, as the organi zation of these chapters might suggest, we would like to emphasize the interplay of these genetic and epigenetic influences in all phases of neural ontogeny, a concept which is made clear by the subject matter of the contributions themselves. The authors of these chapters were participants in selected ~mposia from the Fourth Congress of the International Society of Developmental Neuroscience held in Salt Lake City, Utah, July 3-7, 1983.

Vitamins and Hormones

Effect of calcitonin generelated peptide on contraction of striated muscle in the mouse. Neurosci. Lett. 60, 227—230. Tanuichi, H. (1984). The mechanism of protein folding. In “The Impact of Protein Chemistry on Biomedical Sciences” ...

Vitamins and Hormones

Vitamins and Hormones