The Indigenous Lens

Both contest the boundaries in terms of geography, culture, religion, and ethnicity when thinking of an early indigenous lens in the near and Middle east. a binary of a local or “indigenous lens” versus a global or european one would ...

The Indigenous Lens

The historiography of early photography has scarcely examined Islamic countries in the Near and Middle East, although the new technique was adopted very quickly there by the 1840s. Which regional, local, and global aspects can be made evident? What role did autochthonous image and art traditions have, and which specific functions did photography meet since its introduction? This collective volume deals with examples from Iran, the Ottoman Empire, and the Arab lands and with the question of local specifics, or an „indigenous lens." The contributions broach the issues of regional histories of photography, local photographers, specific themes and practices, and historical collections in these countries. They offer, for the first time in book form, a cross-section through a developing field of the history of photography.

Adjusting the Lens

... Smith, “Mediating Indigenous Identity”; Halkin, “Outside the Indigenous Lens”; Ramos and Castells-Talens, “The Training of Indigenous Videomakers”; Kummels, “Cine Indígena”; and Wortham, “Between the State and Indigenous Autonomy,” ...

Adjusting the Lens

Adjusting the Lens offers a detailed analysis of contemporary, independent, indigenous-language audiovisual production in Mexico and in Mexican migrant communities in the United States. The contributors relate the styles and forms of collaborative and community media production to socially critical, transformative, resistant, and constitutive processes off-screen, thereby exploring the political within the context of the media. The chapters show how diasporic media makers map novel interpretations of image and sound into existing audiovisual discourses to communicate social and cultural changes within their communities that counter stereotypical representations in commercial television and cinema, and contribute to a newfound communal identity. The new media expose the conflict of social movements and/or indigenous and rural communities with the state, challenge Eurocentrism and globalization, and reveal the power of audiovisual production to affect political change.

Cultural Competence and the Higher Education Sector

An Explicit Indigenous Lens Concern was raised by multiple participants that an Indigenous lens is critical to the way in which monitoring and evaluation should be approached in Indigenous higher education contexts in Australia.

Cultural Competence and the Higher Education Sector

This open access book explores cultural competence in the higher education sector from multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary perspectives. It addresses cultural competence in terms of leadership and the role of the higher education sector in cultural competence policy and practice. Drawing on lessons learned, current research and emerging evidence, the book examines various innovative approaches and strategies that incorporate Indigenous knowledge and practices into the development and implementation of cultural competence, and considers the most effective approaches for supporting cultural competence in the higher education sector. This book will appeal to researchers, scholars, policy-makers, practitioners and general readers interested in cultural competence policy and practice.

Indigenous Aspirations and Rights

Indigenous. lens. Carma M. Claw Doctoral Student, New Mexico State University; Diné Nation citizen Deanna M. Kennedy, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, University of Washington Bothell; Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma member Deborah Pembleton, ...

Indigenous Aspirations and Rights

Indigenous peoples are recognised as groups with specific rights based on their historical ties to particular territories. The United Nations estimates there are 370 million Indigenous peoples, with Indigenous populations being recognised in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United States, the Arctic region, Central and South America, and across Asia and Africa. Indigenous Aspirations and Rights takes an Indigenous perspective in examining the intersection of business with Indigenous peoples' rights, in light of the UN Global Compact and the PRME. Indigenous rights include, but are not limited to, human, cultural, educational, employment, participatory development, economic, and social rights, rights to land and natural resources, and impacts on identity, institutions, and relations. This book illustrates three main aspects of business practices in relation to Indigenous peoples: Indigenous perspectives on failures, business and ongoing challenges to Indigenous aspirations and rights, and modelling success for Indigenous and business interests. Edited by three leading voices in Indigenous rights research and practice, Indigenous Aspirations and Rights features contributions from around the globe. The work draws together policy implications for management and implications for Indigenous peoples, and examines how the PRME, the UN Global Compact, and the concept of socially responsible business can be expanded to encompass more positive outcomes for Indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Reconciliation and Decolonization

This chapter focuses on the concept of Canadian reconciliation through the Indigenous lens. By focusing on the Truth and Reconciliation Report and other works completed by the colonial Canadian government, it highlights how much work ...

Indigenous Reconciliation and Decolonization

This book addresses the ethical and practical issues at stake in the reconciliation of Indigenous and non-indigenous communities. An increasing number of researchers, educators, and social and environmental activists are eager to find ways to effectively support ongoing attempts to recognize, integrate and promote Indigenous perspectives and communities. Taking Canada as its focus, this book offers a multidisciplinary consideration of a range of reconciliation policies, practices and initiatives that are relevant in all settler states. Set against its increasing neoliberal appropriation, the book resituates reconciliation in the everyday contexts of community interaction and engagement, as well as in the important areas of Indigenous knowledge, resource management and social and environmental justice. Reconciliation is not just the responsibility of law and government. And, attuned to the different perspectives of settlers, migrants and refugee communities, the book examines areas of opportunity, as well as obstacles to progress, in the forging of a truly decolonizing framework for reconciliation. As the challenges of reconciliation cross numerous academic and substantial areas, this book will appeal to a range of scholars and practitioners working in law, politics, education, environmental studies, anthropology and Indigenous studies.

Indigenous Environmental Justice

... and Jarratt-Snider's discussion of the cleanup efforts of the Native villages of Barrow and Tar Creek. THE BOOK is book considers EJ and (in)justices affecting Indigenous Peoples through an Indigenous lens—that is to say, ...

Indigenous Environmental Justice

"With connections to traditional homelands being at the heart of Native identity, environmental justice is of heightened importance to Indigenous communities. Not only do irresponsible and exploitative environmental policies harm the physical and financial health of Indigenous communities, they also cause spiritual harm by destroying the land and wildlife that are held in a place of exceptional reverence for Indigenous peoples. Combining elements of legal issues, human rights issues, and sovereignty issues, Indigenous Environmental Justice creates a clear example of community resilience in the face of corporate greed"--

Settler City Limits

Indigenous Resurgence and Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West Heather Dorries, Robert Henry, David Hugill, Tyler McCreary, Julie Tomiak. 5 Henry, “Through an Indigenous Lens”; Koch and Scherer, “Redd Alert!

Settler City Limits

While cities like Winnipeg, Minneapolis, Saskatoon, Rapid City, Edmonton, Missoula, Regina, and Tulsa are places where Indigenous marginalization has been most acute, they have also long been sites of Indigenous placemaking and resistance to settler colonialism. Although such cities have been denigrated as “ordinary” or banal in the broader urban literature, they are exceptional sites to study Indigenous resurgence. T​he urban centres of the continental plains have featured Indigenous housing and food co-operatives, social service agencies, and schools. The American Indian Movement initially developed in Minneapolis in 1968, and Idle No More emerged in Saskatoon in 2013. The editors and authors of Settler City Limits , both Indigenous and settler, address urban struggles involving Anishinaabek, Cree, Creek, Dakota, Flathead, Lakota, and Métis peoples. Collectively, these studies showcase how Indigenous people in the city resist ongoing processes of colonial dispossession and create spaces for themselves and their families. Working at intersections of Indigenous studies, settler colonial studies, urban studies, geography, and sociology, this book examines how the historical and political conditions of settler colonialism have shaped urban development in the Canadian Prairies and American Plains. Settler City Limits frames cities as Indigenous spaces and places, both in terms of the historical geographies of the regions in which they are embedded, and with respect to ongoing struggles for land, life, and self-determination.

Indigenous Courts Self Determination and Criminal Justice

... Ruru “An Indigenous Lens into Comparative Law: The Doctrine of Discovery in the United States and New Zealand” (2009) 111 West Virginia L. Rev 849 at 914. Moana Jackson The Māori and the Criminal Justice System – He Whaipaanga Hou: ...

Indigenous Courts  Self Determination and Criminal Justice

In New Zealand, as well as in Australia, Canada and other comparable jurisdictions, Indigenous peoples comprise a significantly disproportionate percentage of the prison population. For example, Maori, who comprise 15% of New Zealand’s population, make up 50% of its prisoners. For Maori women, the figure is 60%. These statistics have, moreover, remained more or less the same for at least the past thirty years. With New Zealand as its focus, this book explores how the fact that Indigenous peoples are more likely than any other ethnic group to be apprehended, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated, might be alleviated. Taking seriously the rights to culture and to self-determination contained in the Treaty of Waitangi, in many comparable jurisdictions (including Australia, Canada, the United States of America), and also in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the book make the case for an Indigenous court founded on Indigenous conceptions of proper conduct, punishment, and behavior. More specifically, the book draws on contemporary notions of ‘therapeutic jurisprudence’ and ‘restorative justice’ in order to argue that such a court would offer an effective way to ameliorate the disproportionate incarceration of Indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Pathways Into Social Research

Her text, as described by Jelena Porsanger (2004), is an essential read for all researchers working in the area of Indigenous peoples. Smith's Indigenous lens critiqued the Western academy. Her examination of the West's obsession to ...

Indigenous Pathways Into Social Research

The life stories included here present the journeys of over 30 indigenous researchers from six continents and many disciplines, including the challenges and oppression they have faced, their strategies for overcoming them, and how their work has produced more meaningful research and a more just society.

The Open Invitation

107. Personal communication with Alexandra Halkin via Skype in May 2011. See also Ojo de Agua Comunicación, Vivenciasy aprendizajes. 108. See Halkin, “Outside the Indigenous Lens,” for a detailed history of the Chiapas Media Project, ...

The Open Invitation

The Open Invitation explores the relationship between prefigurative politics and activist video. Schiwy analyzes activist videos from the 2006 uprising in Oaxaca, the Zapatista’s Other Campaign, as well as collaborative and community video from the Yucatán. Schiwy argues that transnational activist videos and community videos in indigenous languages reveal collaborations and that their political impact cannot be grasped through the concept of the public sphere. Instead, she places these videos in dialogue with recent efforts to understand the political with communality, a mode of governance articulated in indigenous struggles for autonomy, and with cinematic politics of affect.

Crime Victims and Policy

Through a critical Indigenous lens, the problems associated with quantifying Indigenous violence through Eurocentric scientific frames are made manifest. As Indigenous scholar Maggie Walter (2010) has revealed, the production, ...

Crime  Victims and Policy

This book provides critically examines how recent international developments in victims theory and policy are experienced within specific local contexts. The chapters approach key criminological issues including the experience of criminal justice agencies, policy formulation, the construction of victim identities and the 'discovery' of new victims.

Knowledge of Life

A contributor to Indigenous literature criticism, Mudrooroo aimed to reset the critical lens through which Fogarty's work could be appreciated. Another startling addition to the field of Indigenous writing is an education series called ...

Knowledge of Life

Knowledge of Life is a timely publication, which emphasises the importance of relationships between non-Indigenous and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Led by accomplished academic, educator and author Kaye Price, the experienced author team provides students with a comprehensive guide to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia.

Global Indigenous Media

Outside the Indigenous Lens: Zapatistas and Autonomous Videomaking Alexandra Halkin • 160 PART III: CULTURAL IDENTITY, PRESERVATION, AND COMMUNITY-BUILDING THROUGH MEDIA 9. The Search for Well-Being: Placing Development with Indigenous ...

Global Indigenous Media

DIVExplores how indigenous peoples are entering, using, and creating new social spaces in a globalizing media environment, mapping this emergent trend across the globe./div

Indigenomics

The mainstream worldview sees ownership as rights to the land, whereas Indigenous Peoples see ownership as responsibility. ... Through the Indigenous lens, the world reflects back to us reality as seen through our worldview.

Indigenomics

Igniting the $100 billion Indigenous economy It is time. It is time to increase the visibility, role, and responsibility of the emerging modern Indigenous economy and the people involved. This is the foundation for economic reconciliation. This is Indigenomics. Indigenomics lays out the tenets of the emerging Indigenous economy, built around relationships, multigenerational stewardship of resources, and care for all. Highlights include: The ongoing power shift and rise of the modern Indigenous economy Voices of leading Indigenous business leaders The unfolding story in the law courts that is testing Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples Exposure of the false media narrative of Indigenous dependency A new narrative, rooted in the reality on the ground, that Indigenous peoples are economic powerhouses On the ground examples of the emerging Indigenous economy. Indigenomics calls for a new model of development, one that advances Indigenous self-determination, collective well-being, and reconciliation. This is vital reading for business leaders and entrepreneurs, Indigenous organizations and nations, governments and policymakers, and economists. AWARDS SILVER | 2022 Nautilus Book Awards - World Cultures' Transformational Growth & Development SHORTLISTED | 2022 First Nations Community Reads Awards SHORTLISTED | 2021 Donner Prize

Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice

Accountability, therefore, within the framing of an indigenous lens requires attending to both internal as well as external accountability (e.g. standardized testing, meeting national rubrics, and so on).

Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice

The book challenges teachers, researchers, educational leaders, and community stakeholders to build dynamic learning environments through which indigenous learners can be "Boldly Indigenous in a Global World!" Three days of focused dialogue at the 2005 World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education (WIPCE) led to the charge to create Volume II of Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother’s Voice. Building on the first volume, Volume II examines these topics: Regenerating and transforming language and culture pedagogy that reminds us that what is "Contemporary is Native" Living indigenous leadership that engages and ensures the presence, readiness, and civic work of our next generation of leaders Indigenizing assessment and accountability that makes certain that native values and strengths lead this important work Highlighting the power of partnerships that begin with the child-elder, which is then nurtured in community and institutions to cross boundaries of cultural difference, physical geography, native and non-native institutions and communities Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother’s Voice, Volume II honors the wisdom of our ancestors, highlights the diversity of our indigenous stories, and illuminates the passion of forward-looking scholars.

Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies

Not all Indigenous resources have been reviewed for accuracy like those titles in the catalogue of Goodminds.com. ... For Indigenous people, education will always pass through this Indigenous lens and be filtered by residential school, ...

Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies

Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies: A Curricula of Stories and Place. Our book is a compilation of the work of experienced educational researchers and practitioners, all of whom currently work in educational settings across North America. Contributors bring to this discussion, an enriched view of diverse ecological perspectives regarding when and how contemporary environmental and Indigenous curriculum figures into the experiences of curricular theories and practices. This work brings together theorists that inform a cultural ecological analysis of the environmental crisis by exploring the ways in which language informs ways of knowing and being as they outline how metaphor plays a major role in human relationships with natural and reconstructed environments. This book will be of interest to educational researchers and practitioners who will find the text important for envisioning education as an endeavour that situates learning in relation to and informed by an Indigenous Environmental Studies and Eco-justice Education frameworks. This integrated collection of theory and practice of environmental and Indigenous education is an essential tool for researchers, graduate and undergraduate students in faculties of education, environmental studies, social studies, multicultural education, curriculum theory and methods, global and comparative education, and women’s studies. Moreover, this work documents methods of developing ways of implementing Indigenous and Environmental Studies in classrooms and local communities through a framework that espouses an eco-ethical consciousness. The proposed book is unique in that it offers a wide variety of perspectives, inviting the reader to engage in a broader conversation about the multiple dimensions of the relationship between ecology, language, culture, and education in relation to the cultural roots of the environmental crisis that brings into focus the local and global commons, language and identity, and environmental justice through pedagogical approaches by faculty across North America who are actively teaching and researching in this burgeoning field.

Picturing the Ottoman Armenian World

History of Photography 33, no.1 (2009): 80–93. Shaw, Wendy M.K. 'The Ottoman in Ottoman Photography: Producing Identity through its Negation'. In The Indigenous Lens?: Early Photography in the Near and Middle East, edited by Markus ...

Picturing the Ottoman Armenian World

The Armenian contribution to Ottoman photography in the last decades of the empire has been well-documented. Studios founded and run by Armenian Ottomans in Istanbul contributed to the exciting cultural flourishing of Ottoman 'modernity', before its dissolution after World War I. Less known however are the pioneering studios from the east in the empire's Armenian heartlands, whose photographic output reflected and became a major form of documenting the momentous events and changes of the period, from war and revolution to persecution, migration and ultimately, genocide. This book examines photographic activity in three Armenian cities on the Armenian plateau: Erzurum, Kharpert and Van. It explores how indigenous photography was rooted in the seismic social, political and cultural shifts that shaped Armenian lives during the Ottoman Empire's last four decades. Arguing that photographic practice was marked by the era's central movements, it shows how photography was bound-up in Armenian educational endeavours, mass migration and revolutionary activity. Photography responded to and became the instrument of these phenomena, so much so that it can be shown that they were responsible for the very spread of the medium through the Armenian communities of the Ottoman East and the rapid increase in photographic studios. Contributing to growing interest in Ottoman and Middle Eastern photographic history, the book also offers a valuable perspective on the history of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire.

Indigenous Engineering for an Enduring Culture

While this approach is a form of systems thinking, an Indigenous lens can provide new perspectives for those who came recently to Australia, that 1 Comment on project by Lisa Roberts, Artist in Residence at UTS Science, ...

Indigenous Engineering for an Enduring Culture

For many millennia, Indigenous Australians have been engineering the landscape using sophisticated technological and philosophical knowledge systems in a deliberate response to changing social and environmental circumstances. These knowledge systems integrate profound understanding of country and bring together knowledge of the topography and geology of the landscape, its natural cycles and ecological systems, its hydrological systems and natural resources including fauna and flora. This enables people to manage resources sustainably and reliably, and testifies to a developed, contextualised knowledge system and to a society with agency and the capability to maintain and refine accumulated knowledge and material processes. This book is a recognition and acknowledgement of the ingenuity of Indigenous engineering which is grounded in philosophical principles, values and practices that emphasise sustainability, reciprocity, respect, and diversity, and often presents a much-needed challenge to a Western engineering worldview. Each chapter is written by a team of authors combining Indigenous knowledge skills and academic expertise, providing examples of collaboration at the intersection of Western and Indigenous engineering principles, sharing old and new knowledges and skills. These varied approaches demonstrate ways to integrate Indigenous knowledges into the curricula for Australian engineering degrees, in line with the Australian Council of Engineering Deans’ Position Statement on Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives into the engineering curriculum first published in 2017.

Indigenous Women and Street Gangs

“Through an Indigenous Lens: Understanding Indigenous Masculinity and Street Gang Involvement.” PhD dissertation, University of Saskatchewan, 2015. Henry, Robert, and Chelsea Gabel. “It's Not Just a Picture When Lives Are at Stake: ...

Indigenous Women and Street Gangs

"Amber, Bev, Chantel, Jazmyne, Faith, and Jorgina are six Indigenous women previously involved in street gangs or the street lifestyle in Saskatoon, Regina, and Calgary. In collaboration with Indigenous Studies scholar Robert Henry (Métis), they share their stories using photovoice, an emancipatory research process where participants are understood to be the experts of their own experiences. Each photograph in Indigenous Women and Street Gangs was selected and placed in order to show how the authors have changed with their experiences. Following their photographs, the authors each share a narrative that begins with their earliest memory and continues to the present. Together the photographs and narratives bring a deeper meaning to the women's lived realities. Throughout, these women show us the meaning of survivance, a process of resistance, resurgence, and growth. While often difficult to read, the narratives shared by Amber, Bev, Chantel, Jazmyne, Faith, and Jorgina are direct, explicit, sensitive, and imbued with hope and humour. They provide unparalleled insight into the lives of these women and break all kinds of stereotypes along the way."--

Mediated Geographies and Geographies of Media

Introduction: Mainstreaming indigenous geography. ... Community-based participatory research involving indigenous peoples in Canadian geography: Progress? ... Outside the indigenous lens: Zapatistas and autonomous videomaking.

Mediated Geographies and Geographies of Media

This is the first comprehensive volume to explore and engage with current trends in Geographies of Media research. It reviews how conceptualizations of mediated geographies have evolved. Followed by an examination of diverse media contexts and locales, the book illustrates key issues through the integration of theoretical and empirical case studies, and reflects on the future challenges and opportunities faced by scholars in this field. The contributions by an international team of experts in the field, address theoretical perspectives on mediated geographies, methodological challenges and opportunities posed by geographies of media, the role and significance of different media forms and organizations in relation to socio-spatial relations, the dynamism of media in local-global relations, and in-depth case studies of mediated locales. Given the theoretical and methodological diversity of this book, it will provide an important reference for geographers and other interdisciplinary scholars working in cultural and media studies, researchers in environmental studies, sociology, visual anthropology, new technologies, and political science, who seek to understand and explore the interconnections of media, space and place through the examples of specific practices and settings.