The Key of Solomon the King

The Key of Solomon the King

How to make a magic carpet, become invisible, and find love are among the procedures detailed in this famous book of prayers and instructions on trafficking with the spirit world.

The Greater and Lesser Keys of Solomon the King

The Greater and Lesser Keys of Solomon the King

This trade paperback volume contains both The Key of Solomon the King (The Greater Key) and The Lesser Key of Solomon, including all of the original illustrations, diagrams and annotations to aid the reader in their understanding of the Solomon Key. The Key of Solomon the King was originally researched and translated by S.L. MacGregor Mathers from ancient manuscripts in the British museums. Included by Mathers is the Order of the Pentacles of Solomon, the Ancient Fragment of the Key of Solomon, The Qabalistic Invocation of Solomon, and 15 plates full of figures, seals and charts, as well as the original text giving detailed instruction for spells and invocations. The work is traditionally divided into two books detailing the Key of King Solomon. Book One explains the operation of conjurations, curses, spells and other magical works. Book Two instructs the practitioner on the proper attire, purification rituals and other means of obtaining the goals of the Goetia. Between these two books is the list of plates that contain numerous illustrations and secret seals of Solomon, including the Mystical Seal of Solomon, the Pentacles of Solomon, and the Mystical Alphabet, which impart the mechanisms and requirements for the invocation of spirits and demons. The Lesser Key of Solomon, or the Clavicula Salomonis Regis, or Lemegeton, is a compilation of materials and writings from ancient sources making up a text book of magic or "grimoire." Portions of this book can be traced back to the mid-16th to 17th centuries, when occult researchers such as Cornelius Agrippa and Johannes Trithemisus assembled what they discovered during their investigations into their own great works. As a modern grimoire, the Lesser Key of Solomon has seen several editions with various authors and editors taking liberty to edit and translate the ancient writings and source material. In 1898, Arthur Edward Waite published his The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, which contained large portions of the Lemegeton. He was followed by Mathers and Crowley in 1904 who published The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon. Many others have assembled their own version of this ancient material since, and it is important to realize that it is the contents rather than the book itself that make up the Lesser Key. Traditionally, the source material is divided into five books: Ars Goetia, Ars Theurgia Goetia, Ars Paulina, Ars Almadel, and Ars Notoria. Mathers and Crowley indicate their edition is a translation of the first. In the preface to this edition, it is explained that a "Secret Chief" of the Rosicrucian Order directed the completion of the book. The original editor was a G. H. Fra. D.D.C.F. who translated ancient texts from French, Hebrew, and Latin, but was unable to complete his labors because of the martial assaults of the Four Great Princes. Crowley was then asked to step in and finish what the previous author had begun. Traditionally, S. L. MacGregor Mathers is credited as the translator of this edition, and Crowley is given the title of editor. Scholars believe these books of Solomon and their many iterations derive from the ancient practices of Jewish Kabbalah and Arab Alchemy. After time, it is thought Greek and Roman influences were added until, finally, the work was used and molded by high Renaissance magicians. This book, as well as other King Solomon books, such as the Magical Treatise of King Solomon and the Testament of Solomon, were brought back to modern times through the labors of occult practitioners such as S. L. MacGregor Mathers, Aleister Crowley and others around the turn of the last century.

The Book of the Goetia

The Lesser Key of Solomon the King

The Book of the Goetia

1903 from numerous manuscripts in Hebrew, Latin, French and English. the Best, Simplest, Most Intelligible & Most Effective Treatise Extant on Ceremonial Magic.

The Key of Solomon the King

The Key of Solomon the King

One of the most famous of all magical books. Mathers was a 19th century magician and head of the Order of the Golden Dawn. The ancient manuscripts that compose the book were found in the British Museum and are believed by some to be the words and instructions of King Solomon. Instructs how to summon and master spiritual powers, including how to obtain answers to problems from the spirit world. Explains how the choice of time and place, preparation procedures, incantations, fasting, robes, fumigations and various trappings play an integral part in magic. Also covers the planets, prayers and conjurations, invisibility, and more.

The Key of Solomon the King

Clavicula Salomonis

The Key of Solomon the King

A magical grimoire of sigils and rituals for summoning and mastering spirits, The Key of Solomon the King is the most famous, or infamous, of all magick books. It has influenced everything from the revival of magick and the Western Mystery Traditions (tarot, alchemy, astrology, etc.) to fictional works such as Lovecraft's The Necronomicon. Purported to have been penned by King Solomon himself, the book provides instruction for incantations, rituals, and sigils used to call upon and control spirits and demons. Those practicing magick have used it extensively through the centuries, but its true origins and purpose have been lost in the mists of time. No library of the contemporary occult student or practicing magician is complete without this tome. It remains a standard of esoteric lore by which others are measured. This edition includes a new foreword by noted esoteric scholar Joseph Peterson.

The Three Magical Books of Solomon

The Greater and Lesser Keys & The Testament of Solomon

The Three Magical Books of Solomon

For the first time, the three great magical works of King Solomon are together in one volume. The Greater and Lesser Keys give a practical guide to the operation of his magic. The testament gives a historical account of its use by Solomon himself. The Key of Solomon the King was originally researched and translated by S.L. MacGregor Mathers from ancient manuscripts in the British museums. Included by Mathers is the Order of the Pentacles of Solomon, the Ancient Fragment of the Key of Solomon, The Qabalistic Invocation of Solomon, and 15 plates full of figures, seals and charts, as well as the original text giving detailed instruction for spells and invocations. The work is traditionally divided into two books detailing the Key of King Solomon. Book One explains the operation of conjurations, curses, spells and other magical works. Book Two instructs the practitioner on the proper attire, purification rituals and other means of obtaining the goals of the Goetia. Between these two books is the list of plates that contain numerous illustrations and secret seals of Solomon, including the Mystical Seal of Solomon, the Pentacles of Solomon, and the Mystical Alphabet, which impart the mechanisms and requirements for the invocation of spirits and demons. The Lesser Key of Solomon, or the Clavicula Salomonis Regis, or Lemegeton, is a compilation of materials and writings from ancient sources making up a text book of magic or "grimoire." Portions of this book can be traced back to the mid-16th to 17th centuries, when occult researchers such as Cornelius Agrippa and Johannes Trithemisus assembled what they discovered during their investigations into their own great works. As a modern grimoire, the Lesser Key of Solomon has seen several editions with various authors and editors taking liberty to edit and translate the ancient writings and source material. In 1898, Arthur Edward Waite published his The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, which contained large portions of the Lemegeton. He was followed by Mathers and Crowley in 1904 who published The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon. In the preface to this edition, it is explained that a "Secret Chief" of the Rosicrucian Order directed the completion of the book. The original editor was a G. H. Fra. D.D.C.F. who translated ancient texts from French, Hebrew, and Latin, but was unable to complete his labors because of the martial assaults of the Four Great Princes. Crowley was then asked to step in and finish what the previous author had begun. The Testament of Solomon is a pseudepigraphical work attributed to King Solomon the Wise of the Old Testament. Written in the first-person narrative, the book tells the story of the creation of the magical ring of King Solomon and how Solomon's ring was used to bind and control demons, including Beelzebub. In this book of King Solomon, the discourses between the King and the various spirits are told, and the story shows how Solomon uses his wisdom to withstand the demons' tricks and guile and enlist their aid in the building of his temple. The manuscripts from which this work was discovered date from the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. All were written in Greek. This dating makes most experts believe that the work is medieval. But some scholars, including D.C. Duling, argue that it is likely that the work comes from the 5th or 6th centuries.

The Lesser Key of Solomon

Lemegeton Clavicula Salomonis

The Lesser Key of Solomon

Compiled from original manuscripts and fragments in the British Museum Library, Joseph Peterson's new presentation is the most complete and accurate edition of this famous magical grimoire, "The Lesser Key of Solomon the King." He goes to great length to establish the provenance of each part, and possible derivative works, including critical analyses of all major variations, utilizing fresh translations of earlier magical texts such as Johann Trithemius's Steganographia, The Archidoxes of Magic by Paracelsus, and newly discovered Hebrew manuscripts of the original Key of Solomon. Abundantly illustrated, Peterson includes reproductions of the original magical circles, tools, and seals of the spirits with variations of certain drawings from various sources and notae missing from earlier editions. Source list. Appendicies. Index.

The Key of Solomon the King - Scholar's Choice Edition

The Key of Solomon the King - Scholar's Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Three Magical Books of Solomon

The Greater and Lesser Keys and the Testament of Solomon

The Three Magical Books of Solomon

Finally in a single book, the Keys and Testament of Solomon are available together in The Three Magical Books of Solomon: The Greater and Lesser Keys & The Testament of Solomon. The Testament is a story of his use of magic to control demons and the Keys reveal his spells and methods.The Lesser Key of Solomon is a well-know grimoire which has the description of the 72 demons conjured by Solomon, along with illustrations of their sigils, and the instructions for how to summon them. It also lists "Spirits mingled of Good and Evil Natures". The third book, attributed to the Apostle Paul, discusses the "Spirits allotted unto every degree of the 360 Degrees of the Zodiac; and also of the Signs, and of the Planets in the Signs, as well as of the Hours." Later on, Ars Almadel Salomonis provides instructions on how to create a wax tablet with specific designs intended to contact angels via scrying. This book also contains the prayers and orations of Solomon.The Key of Solomon the King is a very famous and important grimoire. It is divided up into two books. The first section includes various chants, spells, and curses to summon or restrain demons and the spirits of the dead. It also contains instructions on how to perform a series of magic spells. The second part describes purifications an exorcist should undergo, as well as on clothing and magical devices.The Testament of Solomon is about demons summoned by King Solomon, and how they can be countered by invoking angels and other magical techniques. It is one of the oldest magical texts attributed to King Solomon, dating First Century A.D.

Grand Key of Solomon the King

Ancient Handbook of Angel Magic and Djinn Summoning

Grand Key of Solomon the King

The enchanting tales of 1001 Arabian Nights and the mysterious magical societies of the Moors share a legendary figure. He is no other than Asaph Ben Berechiah, the Vizier of King Solomon himself. According to Islamic tradition, this Arabian Merlin bested a djinn in a magical contest, teleporting Queen Sheeba's throne in the blink of an eye, using his knowledge of the Great Name. Through the ages masters of the forbidden art of djinn evocation have shared with their disciples in secrecy an extensive oral tradition of rituals, incantations, and magical implements belonging to Asaph Ben Berechiah. Fragments of these arcane mysteries could be found in the writing of master occultists from the Middle Ages, the likes of Ahmed al-Buni. Few and far between, many have treasured what little fragments of this oral tradition could be found. There were also whispers of a grimoire compiled by an anonymous Arabian wizard brimming with secrets of the magic of Asaph Ben Berechiah. Known only as Ajnas, its reputation grew, but few possessed it. It has resurfaced in recent years and remains one of the most popular guides to angelic and djinn evocation in the land of the Arabian nights. O seeker of the art of the masters, you needn't wait centuries for this important grimoire to be available in English as has happened with Ghayat al-Hakim (Picatrix). Right now, you are beholding an accurate and complete translation of Ajnas waiting for its secrets to be unlocked by the disciples of today and the masters of tomorrow. "Heth Heth Sharet Maret Aeeret Ayolet"