The Last Book of Wonder

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Last Book of Wonder

Lord Dunsany - considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula K. Le Guin and others - was a very successful author of numerous books, plays, and short stories. He possessed a remarkable imagination and created fantastical landscapes peopled with unique characters. Tales of Wonder, a collection of short stories, will transport you to another time and to another place and in the midst of it you will be enthralled with the marvel of it all.

Tales Before Narnia

Tales and Other Stories (1910), The Book of Wonder (1912), Fifty-one Tales (1915), Tales of Wonder (1916; U.S. title The Last Book of Wonder), and Tales of Three Hemispheres (1919). Of Dunsany's novels, the best are The King of ...

Tales Before Narnia

In his acclaimed collection Tales Before Tolkien, Douglas A. Anderson illuminated the sources, inspirations, and influences that fired J.R.R. Tolkien’s genius. Now Anderson turns his attention to Tolkien’s colleague and friend C. S. Lewis, whose influence on modern fantasy, through his beloved Narnia books, is second only to Tolkien’s own. In many ways, Lewis’s influence has been even wider than Tolkien’s. For in addition to the Narnia series, Lewis wrote groundbreaking works of science fiction, urban fantasy, and religious allegory, and he came to be regarded as among the most important Christian writers of the twentieth century. It will come as no surprise, then, that such a wide-ranging talent drew inspiration from a variety of sources. Here are twenty of the tributaries that fed Lewis’s unique talent, among them: “The Wood That Time Forgot: The Enchanted Wood,” taken from a never-before-published fantasy by Lewis’s biographer and friend, Roger Lancelyn Green, that directly inspired The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe; E. Nesbit’s charming “The Aunt and Amabel,” in which a young girl enters another world by means of a wardrobe; “The Snow Queen,” by Hans Christian Andersen, featuring the abduction of a young boy by a woman as cruel as she is beautiful; and many more, including works by Charles Dickens, Kenneth Grahame, G. K. Chesterton, and George MacDonald, of whom Lewis would write, “I have never concealed the fact that I regarded him as my master.” Full of fascinating insights into Lewis’s life and fiction, Tales Before Narnia is the kind of book that will be treasured by children and adults alike and passed down lovingly from generation to generation. INCLUDING SEVENTEEN MORE WORKS BY THE PROGENITORS OF MODERN FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION: “Tegnér’s Drapa” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow “The Magic Mirror” by George MacDonald “Undine” by Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué “Letters from Hell: Letter III” by Valdemar Thisted “Fastosus and Avaro” by John Macgowan “The Tapestried Chamber; or, The Lady in the Sacque” by Sir Walter Scott “The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton” by Charles Dickens “The Child and the Giant” by Owen Barfield “A King’s Lesson” by William Morris “The Waif Woman: A Cue—From a Saga” by Robert Louis Stevenson “First Whisper of The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame “The Wish House” by Rudyard Kipling “Et in Sempiternum Pereant” by Charles Williams “The Dragon’s Visit” by J.R.R. Tolkien “The Coloured Lands” by G. K. Chesterton “The Man Who Lived Backwards” by Charles F. Hall “The Dream Dust Factory” by William Lindsay Gresham

Lord Dunsany

There then followed The Last Book of Wonder ( 1916 ; titled Tales of Wonder in England ) . Six of these stories appeared in the Sketch in 1914 with illustrations by Sime , and with the same reverse method of composition ; the rest of ...

Lord Dunsany

This is the first full-length study of Lord Dunsany's work. Dunsany (1878-1957) was one of the most popular and critically acclaimed writers of the early 20th century and one of the critical figures in modern fantasy; a significant influence on Tolkien, Le Guin and others.

Critical Essays on Lord Dunsany

The last decades of the nineteenth century had seen such things as the jewelled fairy tales of Oscar Wilde and the ... Tales (1910); The Book of Wonder (1912); Five Plays (1914); Fifty-one Tales (1915); The Last Book of Wonder (1916); ...

Critical Essays on Lord Dunsany

This collection of new essays and reprints of significant articles provides a comprehensive picture of Lord Dunsany’s contribution to fantasy fiction and world literature. These essays make a case for the continued study of this neglected but hugely influential writer.

Don Rodriguez Chronicles of Shadow Valley

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

Don Rodriguez  Chronicles of Shadow Valley

After long and patient research I am still unable to give to the reader of these Chronicles the exact date of the times that they tell of. Were it merely a matter of history there could be no doubts about the period; but where magic is concerned, to however slight an extent, there must always be some element of mystery, arising partly out of ignorance and partly from the compulsion of those oaths by which magic protects its precincts from the tiptoe of curiosity. Moreover, magic, even in small quantities, appears to affect time, much as acids affect some metals, curiously changing its substance, until dates seem to melt into a mercurial form that renders them elusive even to the eye of the most watchful historian. It is the magic appearing in Chronicles III and IV that has gravely affected the date, so that all I can tell the reader with certainty of the period is that it fell in the later years of the Golden Age in Spain.

Time and the Gods

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

Time and the Gods

Time and the Gods is the second book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. Written in his characteristic literary, lyrical style, this collection contains a series of short stories linked by Dunsany's invented pantheon of deities who dwell in Pegana.

The Pleasures of a Futuroscope

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Pleasures of a Futuroscope

Lord Dunsany, Irish master of fantasy, was the author of more than a dozen novels, hundreds of short stories, poems, and essays, and dozens of plays. In this powerful and moving novel, written in 1955, a futuroscope - a device that allows a viewer to see into the near or distant future - reveals an awful fate for humanity: a nuclear holocaust has destroyed nearly all human life on the planet. The great city of London is now merely an immense crater, filled in with water from the Thames. The pitiful remnants of humanity have been reduced to a Stone Age existence. The narrator, obsessively looking through the futuroscope, focuses upon the plight of a single family in their struggles to survive and fend off the many enemies, both animal and human, that surround them. When one of their number is kidnapped by a band of gypsies, we can only wonder at her fate in this brave new world of the distant future. Gripping, horrifying, touching, and fascinating, The Pleasures of a Futuroscope shows that Lord Dunsany retained his literary powers undiminished to the end of his life.

A Dreamer s Tales

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

A Dreamer s Tales

A Dreamer's Tales, a collection of fantasy short stories, is the fifth book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others

The Charwoman s Shadow

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Charwoman s Shadow

An old woman who spends her days scrubbing the floors might be an unlikely damsel in distress, but Lord Dunsany proves once again his mastery of the fantastical. The Charwoman's Shadow is a beautiful tale of a sorcerer's apprentice who discovers his master's nefarious usage of stolen shadows, and vows to save the charwoman from her slavery.

The Travel Tales of Mr Joseph Jorkens

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Travel Tales of Mr Joseph Jorkens

The Travel Tales of Mr. Joseph Jorkens, the first collection of Dunsany's Jorkens tales to be published, containing thirteen short pieces. The Jorkens stories are set in the London gentleman's or adventurer's club of which the title character is a member. They usually open with another member mentioning an interesting experience he has had; this rouses Jorkens, who in return for a whisky-and-soda (merely to "moisten his throat," you understand!) goes the other member one better with an extraordinary tall tale, supposedly from his own past. His stories often tip well over the boundaries of the plausible, into the realms of fantasy, horror, or even science fiction, and his auditors can never be quite sure what proportion of what he relates was truly experienced and to what degree he might have embellished.

The Curse of the Wise Woman

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Curse of the Wise Woman

After his father's interference in Irish politics ends with a band of killers arriving on Christmas night to assassinate him, young Charles Peridore finds himself master of the estate. During idyllic school holidays, Charles enjoys riding to hounds and hunting geese and snipe while his friend Tommy Marlin tells stories of Tir-nan-Og, the land of eternal youth that lies just beyond the bog. But when Progress arrives in the form of an English corporation determined to convert the landscape into factories and housing, it appears that an entire way of life is destined to vanish. Only one thing stands in the way: the sorcery of an old witch, whose curses the English workers do not even believe in. In the novel's unforgettable conclusion, the ancient powers of the wise woman will be pitted against the machinery of modern corporate greed, with surprising and thrilling results.

The Strange Journeys of Colonel Polders

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

The Strange Journeys of Colonel Polders

In this classic fantasy story, a no-nonsense British officer, having offended an Indian swami in his club, finds his spirit lodged into a succession of animal bodies. Some of the animals the officer's spirit enters are a cat, a goat, an eel, a fox, and many others. In his fantastic style, Dunsany captures the exact sentiments of each animal, making it believable that the office has, in fact, taken them as his own. The Strange Journeys of Colonel Polders is a fantastic tale that takes you to the core of fantasy writing and shows the skill of Lord Dunsany, which many writers hold in the absolute highest regard. A lost classic, The Strange Journeys of Colonel Polders is finally available for readers of the beloved fantasy genre.

Mr Jorkens Remembers Africa

... Has a Large Whiskey (1940) The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947) Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954) The Last Book ... Tale (1910) The Book of Wonder (1912) Fifty-One Tales (1915) Tales of Wonder (1916) (aka The Last Book of Wonder) ...

Mr Jorkens Remembers Africa

Jorkens Remembers Africa, the second collection of Dunsany's Jorkens tales to be published, is a collection of fantasy short stories, narrated by Mr. Joseph Jorkens. The book collects twenty-one short pieces by Dunsany. The Jorkens stories are set in the London gentleman's or adventurer's club of which the title character is a member. They usually open with another member mentioning an interesting experience he has had; this rouses Jorkens, who in return for a whisky-and-soda (merely to "moisten his throat," you understand!) goes the other member one better with an extraordinary tall tale, supposedly from his own past. His stories often tip well over the boundaries of the plausible, into the realms of fantasy, horror, or even science fiction, and his auditors can never be quite sure what proportion of what he relates was truly experienced and to what degree he might have embellished.

Twentieth Century Drama

The Book of Wonder: A Chronicle of Little Adventures at the Edge of the World. 1912. Fifty-One Tales. 1915. Tales of Wonder. 1916; as The Last Book of Wonder, 1916. Tales of War. 1918. Tales of Three Hemispheres. 1919.

Twentieth Century Drama

A compendium of information on all the main events, individuals, political groupings and issues of the 20th century. It provides a guide to current thinking on important historical topics and personalities within the period, and offers a guide to further reading.

In the Land of Time

... The Gods of Pegaāna, and its critical and popular success impelled the publication of numerous other collections of short stories, including A Dreamer's Tales (1910), The Book of Wonder (1912), and The Last Book of Wonder (1916).

In the Land of Time

A new edition of the Fantasy Tales that inspired J.R.R. Tolkien and H.P. Lovecraft A pioneer in the realm of imaginative literature, Lord Dunsany has gained a cult following for his influence on modern fantasy literature, including such authors as J.R.R. Tolkien and H. P. Lovecraft. This unique collection of short stories ranges over five decades of work. Liberal selections of earlier tales—including the entire Gods of Pegana as well as such notable works as "Idle Days of the Yann" and "The Fortress Unvanquishable, Save for Sacnoth"—are followed by memorable later tales, including several about the garrulous traveler Joseph Jorkens and the outrageous murder tale "The Two Bottles of Relish." Throughout, the stories are united by Dunsany's cosmic vision, his impeccable and mellifluous prose, and his distinctively Irish sense of whimsy. Here published for the first time by Penguin Classics, this edition is the only annotated version of Dunsany's short stories. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

A Subtler Magick

... The Book of Wonder (1912), Fifty-One Tales (1915), The Last Book of Wonder (1916), and Tales of Three Hemispheres (1919); and the play collections Five Plays (1914) and Plays of Gods and Men (1917) — represent the most remarkable ...

A Subtler Magick

He was the premier writer of horror fiction in the first half of the 20th Century, perhaps the major American practitioner of the art between the time of Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King. Born into an upper middle class family in Providence, Rhode Island, Howard Phillips Lovecraft (1890-1937) had a lonely childhood, but read voraciously from his earliest years. He soon became interested in science and astronomy and began penning stories, poetry, and essays in great profusion, publishing them himself when no other market was available. The advent of Weird Tales in 1923 gave him a small outlet for his work, and he attracted a large number of followers, with whom he exchanged literally tens of thousands of letters, many of them quite lengthy. A number of these young correspondents eventually became professional writers and editors themselves. Lovecraft's fame began spreading beyond fandom with the publication of his first significant collection, The Outsider and Others, in 1939, two years after his untimely death. Book jacket.

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

... without saying a word ... they neatly hanged him on the outer wall'), 51 Tales (1915), Tales of Wonder (1916, called in America The Last Book of Wonder), and Tales of Three Hemispheres (1919), Dunsany expanded his mythopoeic vision.

The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales

This Oxford companion provides an authoritative reference source for fairy tales, exploring the tales themselves, both ancient and modern, the writers who wrote and reworked them and related topics such as film, art, opera and even advertising.

Windows of the Imagination

He is best known, of course, for what are usefully called the "wonder books," beginning with The Gods of Pegana in 1905. ... The Book of Wonder (1912), Tales of Wonder (1916; American title, The Last Book of Wonder), and Tales of Three ...

Windows of the Imagination

"These 29 essays on fantasy, skepticism, writing, and related topics--spanning nearly two decades--are filled with the insightful observations of a literary master. Schweitzer is one of the best critics in the field."--John Gregory Betancourt. (Criticism)

Tales Before Tolkien The Roots of Modern Fantasy

... A Dreamer's Tales and Other Stories (1910), The Book of Wonder (1912), Fifty-one Tales (1915), Tales of Wonder (1916; U.S. title The Last Book of Wonder), and Tales of Three Hemispheres (1919). Of Dunsany's novels, the best are The ...

Tales Before Tolkien  The Roots of Modern Fantasy

Terry Brooks. David Eddings. George R. R. Martin. Robin Hobb. The top names in modern fantasy all acknowledge J. R. R. Tolkien as their role model, the author whose work inspired them to create their own epics. But what writers influenced Tolkien himself? Here, internationally recognized Tolkien expert Douglas A. Anderson has gathered the fiction of authors who sparked Tolkien’s imagination in a collection destined to become a classic in its own right. Andrew Lang’s romantic swashbuckler, “The Story of Sigurd,” features magic rings, an enchanted sword, and a brave hero loved by two beautiful women— and cursed by a ferocious dragon. Tolkien read E. A. Wyke-Smith’s “The Marvelous Land of Snergs” to his children, delighting in these charming tales of a pixieish people “only slightly taller than the average table.” Also appearing in this collection is a never-before-published gem by David Lindsay, author of Voyage to Arcturus, a novel which Tolkien praised highly both as a thriller and as a work of philosophy, religion, and morals. In stories packed with magical journeys, conflicted heroes, and terrible beasts, this extraordinary volume is one that no fan of fantasy or Tolkien should be without. These tales just might inspire a new generation of creative writers. Tales Before Tolkien: 22 Magical Stories “The Elves” by Ludwig Tieck “The Golden Key” by George Macdonald “Puss-Cat Mew” by E. H. Knatchbull-Hugessen “The Griffin and the Minor Canon” by Frank R. Stockton “The Demon Pope” by Richard Garnett “The Story of Sigurd” by Andrew Lang “The Folk of the Mountain Door” by William Morris “Black Heart and White Heart” by H. Rider Haggard “The Dragon Tamers” by E. Nesbit “The Far Islands” by John Buchan “The Drawn Arrow” by Clemence Housman “The Enchanted Buffalo” by L. Frank Baum “Chu-bu and Sheemish” by Lord Dunsany “The Baumhoff Explosive” by William Hope Hodgson “The Regent of the North” by Kenneth Morris “The Coming of the Terror” by Arthur Machen “The Elf Trap” by Francis Stevens “The Thin Queen of Elfhame” by James Branch Cabell “The Woman of the Wood” by A. Merritt “Golithos the Ogre” by E. A. Wyke-Smith “The Story of Alwina” by Austin Tappan Wright “A Christmas Play” by David Lindsay

An H P Lovecraft Encyclopedia

Later, Houdini wonders at the anomalous resemblance of el Drogman to the ancient pharaoh, King Khephren. ... A Dreamer's Tales (1910), The Book of Wonder (1912), Fifty-one Tales (1915), The Last Book of Wonder (1916), and Tales of Three ...

An H P  Lovecraft Encyclopedia

Provides a guide to Lovecraft's life and work covering his fiction, poetry, journalism, creatures and characters, friends, colleagues, and associates.