The Last Wild Men of Borneo

Here is a peerless adventure propelled by the entwined lives of two singular, enigmatic men whose stories reveal both the grandeur and the precarious fate of the wildest place on earth.

The Last Wild Men of Borneo

“Adventure travel at its best.” —Kirkus (*starred review*) • “Haunting.” —Booklist (*starred review*) • "A marvellously told and important story." —Peter Stark Two modern adventurers sought a treasure possessed by the legendary “Wild Men of Borneo.” One found riches. The other vanished forever into an endless jungle. Had he shed civilization—or lost his mind? Global headlines suspected murder. Lured by these mysteries, New York Times bestselling author Carl Hoffman journeyed to find the truth, discovering that nothing is as it seems in the world’s last Eden, where the lines between sinner and saint blur into one. In 1984, Swiss traveler Bruno Manser joined an expedition to the Mulu caves on Borneo, the planet’s third largest island. There he slipped into the forest interior to make contact with the Penan, an indigenous tribe of peace-loving nomads living among the Dayak people, the fabled “Headhunters of Borneo.” Bruno lived for years with the Penan, gaining acceptance as a member of the tribe. However, when commercial logging began devouring the Penan’s homeland, Bruno led the tribe against these outside forces, earning him status as an enemy of the state, but also worldwide fame as an environmental hero. He escaped captivity under gunfire twice, but the strain took a psychological toll. Then, in 2000, Bruno disappeared without a trace. Had he become a madman, a hermit, or a martyr? American Michael Palmieri is, in many ways, Bruno’s opposite. Evading the Vietnam War, the Californian wandered the world, finally settling in Bali in the 1970s. From there, he staged expeditions into the Bornean jungle to acquire astonishing art and artifacts from the Dayaks. He would become one of the world’s most successful tribal-art field collectors, supplying sacred works to prestigious museums and wealthy private collectors. And yet suspicion shadowed this self-styled buccaneer who made his living extracting the treasure of the Dayak: Was he preserving or exploiting native culture? As Carl Hoffman unravels the deepening riddle of Bruno’s disappearance and seeks answers to the questions surrounding both men, it becomes clear saint and sinner are not so easily defined and Michael and Bruno are, in a sense, two parts of one whole: each spent his life in pursuit of the sacred fire of indigenous people. The Last Wild Men of Borneo is the product of Hoffman’s extensive travels to the region, guided by Penan through jungle paths traveled by Bruno and by Palmieri himself up rivers to remote villages. Hoffman also draws on exclusive interviews with Manser’s family and colleagues, and rare access to his letters and journals. Here is a peerless adventure propelled by the entwined lives of two singular, enigmatic men whose stories reveal both the grandeur and the precarious fate of the wildest place on earth.

Museums and Anthropology in the Age of Engagement

For a popular recent account of international collectors operating in Borneo in the 1970s, see Carl Hoffman's The Last Wild Men of Borneo: A True Story of Death and Treasure (2018). 6 Although Rumphuis has come to be identified with the ...

Museums and Anthropology in the Age of Engagement

Museums and Anthropology in the Age of Engagement considers changes that have been taking place in museum anthropology as it has been responding to pressures to be more socially relevant, useful, and accountable to diverse communities. Based on the author’s own research and applied work over the past 30 years, the book gives examples of the wide-ranging work being carried out today in museum anthropology as both an academic, scholarly field and variety of applied, public anthropology. While it examines major trends that characterize our current "age of engagement," the book also critically examines the public role of museums and anthropology in colonial and postcolonial contexts, namely in the US, the Netherlands, and Indonesia. Throughout the book, Kreps questions what purposes and interests museums and anthropology serve in these different times and places. Museums and Anthropology in the Age of Engagement is a valuable resource for readers interested in an historical and comparative study of museums and anthropology, and the forms engagement has taken. It should be especially useful to students and instructors looking for a text that provides in one volume a history of museum anthropology and methods for doing critical, reflexive museum ethnography and collaborative work.

Freak Show

The Davis brothers became extremely well known, and other minor exhibits used “The Wild Men of Borneo” title; ... But, for many who viewed them, they were the remnants of an ancient civilization—“The Last of the Ancient Aztecs of Mexico ...

Freak Show

This cultural history of the travelling freak show in America chronicles the rise and fall of the industry as attitudes about disability evolved. From 1840 until 1940, hundreds of freak shows crisscrossed the United States, from the smallest towns to the largest cities, exhibiting their casts of dwarfs, giants, Siamese twins, bearded ladies, savages, snake charmers, fire eaters, and other oddities. By today’s standards such displays would be considered cruel and exploitative—the pornography of disability. Yet for one hundred years the freak show was widely accepted as one of America’s most popular forms of entertainment. Robert Bogdan’s fascinating social history brings to life the world of the freak show and explores the culture that nurtured and, later, abandoned it. In uncovering this neglected chapter of show business, he describes in detail the flimflam artistry behind the shows, the promoters and the audiences, and the gradual evolution of public opinion from awe to embarrassment. Freaks were not born, Bogdan reveals; they were manufactured by the amusement world, usually with the active participation of the freaks themselves. Many of the "human curiosities" found fame and fortune, until the ascent of professional medicine transformed them from marvels into pathological specimens.

Hellfire from Paradise Ranch

... con men belong to the national narrative—in particular to the American obsession with fabricating “wild” men such as the hoaxer P.T. Barnum's “Wild Men of Borneo” and “the Wild Australian Children,” along with Ishi, the “last wild ...

Hellfire from Paradise Ranch

In this intimate and innovative work, terror expert Joseba Zulaika examines drone warfare as manhunting carried out via satellite. Using Creech Air Force Base near Las Vegas as his center of study, he interviews drone operators as well as resisters to the war economy of the region to expose the layers of fantasy on which counterterrorism and its self-sustaining logic are grounded. Hellfire from Paradise Ranch exposes the terror and warfare of drone killings that dominate our modern military. It unveils the trauma drone operators experience, in part due to their visual intimacy with their victims, and explores the resistance to drone killings in the same apocalyptic Nevada desert where nuclear testing, pacifist militancy, and Shoshone tradition overlap. Stunning and absorbing, Zulaika offers a richly detailed account of how we continue to manufacture, deconstruct, and perpetuate terror.

The Falcon Thief

—Carl Hoffman, New York Times bestselling author of The Last Wild Men of Borneo and Savage Harvest “You don't need ... By the final page, I had learned, and cared, more about the secret world of falcons and the people who love them than ...

The Falcon Thief

A “well-written, engaging detective story” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) about a rogue who trades in rare birds and their eggs—and the wildlife detective determined to stop him. On May 3, 2010, an Irish national named Jeffrey Lendrum was apprehended at Britain’s Birmingham International Airport with a suspicious parcel strapped to his stomach. Inside were fourteen rare peregrine falcon eggs snatched from a remote cliffside in Wales. So begins a “vivid tale of obsession and international derring-do” (Publishers Weekly), following the parallel lives of a globe-trotting smuggler who spent two decades capturing endangered raptors worth millions of dollars as race champions—and Detective Andy McWilliam of the United Kingdom’s National Wildlife Crime Unit, who’s hell bent on protecting the world’s birds of prey. “Masterfully constructed” (The New York Times) and “entertaining and illuminating” (The Washington Post), The Falcon Thief will whisk you away from the volcanoes of Patagonia to Zimbabwe’s Matobo National Park, and from the frigid tundra near the Arctic Circle to luxurious aviaries in the deserts of Dubai, all in pursuit of a man who is reckless, arrogant, and gripped by a destructive compulsion to make the most beautiful creatures in nature his own. It’s a story that’s part true-crime narrative, part epic adventure—and wholly unputdownable until the very last page.

Green Heroes

The last wild men of Borneo: A true story of death and treasure. New York: William Morrow. Manser, B. (2015). Voices from the rainforest: Testimonies of a threatened people. Petaling Jaya: Strategic Information and Research Development ...

Green Heroes

This book provides an introduction into the diversity of the environmental movement through great characters in the green sector. The book describes inspiring personal achievements, and at the same time it provides readers with information regarding the history, the main directions and the ethical principles of the environmental movement. Some of the most important characters of the movement from all around the world, are included in the book. As well as the title characters, Buddha and Leonardo DiCaprio, other famous environmentalists like Albert Schweitzer, David Attenborough and Jane Goodall are discussed. Some of the less well-known but equally important environmentalists such as Chico Mendes, Bruno Manser, Henry Spira, Tom Regan or Rossano Ercolini are highlighted in the various chapters. The selection of characters represents all major branches within the green sector, ranging from medieval saints to Hollywood celebrities, from university professors to field activists, from politicians to philosophers, from ecofeminists to radicals.

Liar s Circus

In this work of daring and immersive contemporary anthropology, Carl Hoffman, who has written about the most dangerous and remote corners of the world, journeys deep inside Donald Trump’s rallies seeking to understand the strange and ...

Liar   s Circus

In this work of daring and immersive contemporary anthropology, Carl Hoffman, who has written about the most dangerous and remote corners of the world, journeys deep inside Donald Trump’s rallies seeking to understand the strange and powerful tribe that forms the president’s base.

With the Wild Men of Borneo

After a number of years of negotiations , in 1892 the last claimant , Holland , agreed to fixing the boundaries as they now stand between Dutch and British Borneo . The sultanate of Brunei , once so large and prosperous , has dwindled ...

With the Wild Men of Borneo


Bunk

... or Custer's last stand, with Cody and his “Rough Riders” arriving a moment too late to save the day. ... ordinary native peoples—or fabricating “wild men” like Barnum's “Wild Men of Borneo” and “The Wild Australian Children,” who in ...

Bunk

Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction “There Kevin Young goes again, giving us books we greatly need, cleverly disguised as books we merely want. Unexpectedly essential.”—Marlon James Award-winning poet and critic Kevin Young tours us through a rogue’s gallery of hoaxers, plagiarists, forgers, and fakers—from the humbug of P. T. Barnum and Edgar Allan Poe to the unrepentant bunk of JT LeRoy and Donald J. Trump. Bunk traces the history of the hoax as a peculiarly American phenomenon, examining what motivates hucksters and makes the rest of us so gullible. Disturbingly, Young finds that fakery is woven from stereotype and suspicion, race being the most insidious American hoax of all. He chronicles how Barnum came to fame by displaying figures like Joice Heth, a black woman whom he pretended was the 161-year-old nursemaid to George Washington, and What Is It?, an African American man Barnum professed was a newly discovered missing link in evolution. Bunk then turns to the hoaxing of history and the ways that forgers, plagiarists, and journalistic fakers invent backstories and falsehoods to sell us lies about themselves and about the world in our own time, from pretend Native Americans Grey Owl and Nasdijj to the deadly imposture of Clark Rockefeller, from the made-up memoirs of James Frey to the identity theft of Rachel Dolezal. In this brilliant and timely work, Young asks what it means to live in a post-factual world of “truthiness” where everything is up for interpretation and everyone is subject to a pervasive cynicism that damages our ideas of reality, fact, and art.

The Last Pirate of New York

He began by producing sidewalk freak shows with bearded ladies and rubber men. ... the armless wonder, the wild men of Borneo, the Fiji mermaid—a monkey torso attached to the body of a fish—the snake charmer, the The Trial 105.

The Last Pirate of New York

Was he New York City’s last pirate . . . or its first gangster? This is the true story of the bloodthirsty underworld legend who conquered Manhattan, dock by dock—for fans of Gangs of New York and Boardwalk Empire. “History at its best . . . I highly recommend this remarkable book.”—Douglas Preston, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Lost City of the Monkey God Handsome and charismatic, Albert Hicks had long been known in the dive bars and gin joints of the Five Points, the most dangerous neighborhood in maritime Manhattan. For years, he operated out of the public eye, rambling from crime to crime, working on the water in ships, sleeping in the nickel-a-night flops, drinking in barrooms where rat-baiting and bear-baiting were great entertainments. His criminal career reached its peak in 1860, when he was hired, under an alias, as a hand on an oyster sloop. His plan was to rob the ship and flee, disappearing into the teeming streets of lower Manhattan, as he’d done numerous times before, eventually finding his way back to his nearsighted Irish immigrant wife (who, like him, had been disowned by her family) and their infant son. But the plan went awry—the ship was found listing and unmanned in the foggy straits of Coney Island—and the voyage that was to enrich him instead led to his last desperate flight. Long fascinated by gangster legends, Rich Cohen tells the story of this notorious underworld figure, from his humble origins to the wild, globe-crossing, bacchanalian crime spree that forged his ruthlessness and his reputation, to his ultimate incarnation as a demon who terrorized lower Manhattan, at a time when pirates anchored off 14th Street. Advance praise for The Last Pirate of New York “A remarkable work of scholarship about old New York, combined with a skillfully told, edge-of-your-seat adventure story—I could not put it down.”—Ian Frazier, author of Travels in Siberia “With its wise and erudite storytelling, Rich Cohen’s The Last Pirate of New York takes the reader on an exciting nonfiction narrative journey that transforms a grisly nineteenth-century murder into a shrewd portent of modern life. Totally unique, totally compelling, I enjoyed every page.”—Howard Blum, New York Times bestselling author of Gangland and American Lightning

Freak Show Legacies

Echoing the Scientific American article, Carrington asserts that “the sideshow is practically a thing of the past. ... had happened to the “Wild Men of Borneo,” he informs them that the last of them had died in Waltham, Massachusetts, ...

Freak Show Legacies

Society has long been fascinated with the freakish, shocking and strange. In this book Gary Cross shows how freakish elements have been embedded in modern popular culture over the course of the 20th century despite the evident disenchantment with this once widespread cultural outlet. Exploring how the spectacle of freakishness conflicted with genteel culture, he shows how the condemnation of the freak show by middle-class America led to a transformation and merging of genteel and freak culture through the cute, the camp and the creepy. Though the carnival and circus freak was marginalised by the 1960s and had largely disappeared by the 1980s, forms of freakish culture survived and today appear in reality TV, horror movies, dark comedies and the popularity of tattoos. Freak Show Legacies will focus less on the individual 'freak' as 'the other' in society, and more on the audience for the freakish and the transformation of wonder, sensibility and sensitivity that this phenomenon entailed. It will use the phenomenon of 'the freak' to understand the transformation of American popular culture across the 20th century, identify elements of 'the freak' in popular culture both past and present, and ask how it has prevailed despite its apparent unpopularity.

The Sovereign Outsider

Among these were albinos, dwarves, people born with missing limbs or extra limbs, conjoined twins, men and women ... General Tom Thumb, and “The Wild Men of Borneo” Hiram and Barney Davis (midgets), “The Last of the Ancient Aztecs of ...

The Sovereign Outsider

The "Sovereign Outsider" is a literary character of 19th Century American literature that cannot be classified within the cultural, economical, religious, and political (non-)discursive formation of antebellum America. His resistance to associate with any political and social network alludes to the anarchist philosophy of postanarchism that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches. Mathias Hagen König depicts Bartleby, Billy Budd, Huckleberry Finn, Sheppard Lee, Peter Rugg, and Rip van Winkle as prime examples of the "Sovereign Outsider" through the writings of the so-called individualist anarchists Josiah Warren and Stephen Pearl Andrews, the canonical texts of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, and the poems of Walt Whitman. Furthermore, he explores numerous historico-cultural questions: What is the established discursive formation of the United States in the mid-19th Century? What is its subculture? Why does the ideal of a "Sovereign Outsider" appear in American literature of the 19th Century within the writings of politically and poetically incoherent writers? And in how far does antebellum literature represent American culture?

A Secret Never Told

Along the street, every façade was covered with colorful promises. THE LAST DAYS OF POMPEII. THE INEXHAUSTIBLE COW. TRIP TO THE NORTH POLE. WILD MEN OF BORNEO. One more fantastic than the other, until Lily was practically hanging out of ...

A Secret Never Told

Miss Fisher meets Downton Abbey in A Secret Never Told, the fourth installment in the critically acclaimed mystery series from New York Times bestselling author Shelley Noble. Philomena Amesbury, expatriate Countess of Dunbridge, is bored. Coney Island in the sweltering summer of 1908 offers no shortage of diversions for a young woman of means, but sea bathing, horse racing, and even amusement parks can’t hold a candle to uncovering dastardly plots and chasing villains. Lady Dunbridge hadn’t had a big challenge in months. Fate obliges when Phil is called upon to host a dinner party in honor of a visiting Austrian psychologist whose revolutionary theories may be of interest to the War Department, not to mention various foreign powers, and who may have already survived one attempt on his life. The guest list includes a wealthy industrialist, various rival scientists and academics, a party hypnotist, a flamboyant party-crasher, and a damaged beauty whose cloudy psyche is lost in a world of its own. Before the night is out, one of the guests is dead with a bullet between the eyes and Phil finds herself with another mystery on her hands, even if it’s unclear who exactly the intended victim was meant to be. Worse yet, the police’s prime suspect is a mystery man who Phil happens to be rather intimately acquainted with. Now it’s up to Lady Dunbridge, with the invaluable assistance of her intrepid butler and lady’s maid, to find the real culprit before the police nab the wrong one . . . At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Barney and Hiram Davis worked for decades as savages, the “Wild Men from Borneo.” Freak show managers sold “Maximo” and “Bartola” as the “last of the ancient Aztecs,” and anthropologists studied, measured, and photographed them naked as ...

Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Although scholars in the environmental humanities have been exploring the dichotomy between "wild" and "built" environments for several years, few have focused on the field of disability studies, a discipline that enlists the contingency between environments and bodies as a foundation of its scholarship. On the other hand, scholars in disability studies have demonstrated the ways in which the built environment privileges some bodies and minds over others, yet they have rarely examined the ways in which toxic environments engender chronic illness and disability or how environmental illnesses disrupt dominant paradigms for scrutinizing "disability." Designed as a reader for undergraduate and graduate courses, Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities employs interdisciplinary perspectives to examine such issues as slow violence, imperialism, race, toxicity, eco-sickness, the body in environmental justice, ableism, and other topics. With a historical scope spanning the seventeenth century to the present, this collection not only presents the foundational documents informing this intersection of fields but also showcases the most current work, making it an indispensable reference.

Material Ecocriticism

... “Wild Men from Borneo.” Freak-show managers sold “Maximo” and “Bartola” as the “last of the ancient Aztecs,” and anthropologists studied, measured, and photographed them naked as “throwbacks” to an earlier time in human evolution.

Material Ecocriticism

Material Ecocriticism offers new ways to analyze language and reality, human and nonhuman life, mind and matter, without falling into well-worn paths of thinking. Bringing ecocriticism closer to the material turn, the contributions to this landmark volume focus on material forces and substances, the agency of things, processes, narratives and stories, and making meaning out of the world. This broad-ranging reflection on contemporary human experience and expression provokes new understandings of the planet to which we are intimately connected.

Disability and Animality

... passivity and victimization.83 In this chapter Bogdan also discusses freak performers Hiram and Barney Davis, exhibited as “The Wild Men of Borneo,”84 and Maximo and Bartola, exhibited as “The Last of the Ancient Aztecs of Mexico.

Disability and Animality

The fields of Critical Disability Studies and Critical Animal Studies are growing rapidly, but how do the implications of these endeavours intersect? Disability and Animality: Crip Perspectives in Critical Animal Studies explores some of the ways that the oppression of more-than-human animals and disabled humans are interconnected. Composed of thirteen chapters by an international team of specialists plus a Foreword by Lori Gruen, the book is divided into four themes: Intersections of Ableism and Speciesism Thinking Animality and Disability together in Political and Moral Theory Neurodiversity and Critical Animals Studies Melancholy, Madness, and Misfits. This book will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as postdoctoral scholars, interested in Animal Studies, Disability Studies, Mad Studies, philosophy, and literary analysis. It will also appeal to those interested in the relationships between speciesism, ableism, saneism, and racism in animal agriculture, culture, built environments, and ethics.

A History of Early Film

Their return over the mountains gives some splendid glimpses of wild and tropical scenery , The wonderful Borneo railway ... for the Urban Trading Company , concludes with a stirring march and mock fight of the “ wild men of Borneo .

A History of Early Film


Professional Savages

WILD MEN OF BORNEO They lived in deep cayerns and slept on the boughs of trees . en ROYCANCE - CONY In thla sge of sensational surprise an ordinary feature ... They yielded at last when boundaries Art Annen we chutine and Most Marvelous ...

Professional Savages

In August 1882 the circus impresario P. T. Barnum called for examples of "all the uncivilized races in existence.” In response, the showman R. A. Cunningham shipped two groups of Australian Aborigines to the United States. They were displayed as "cannibals” in circuses, dime museums, fairgrounds, and other showplaces in America and Europe and examined and photographed by anthropologists. Roslyn Poignant tells the fascinating and often searing story of the transformation of the Aboriginal travelers into accomplished performers, professional savages who survived at least for a short time by virtue of the strengths they drew from their own culture and their individual adaptability. Most died somewhere on tour. A century later, the mummified body of Tambo, the first to die, was discovered in the basement of a recently closed funeral home in Cleveland, Ohio. Poignant recounts how Tambo’s posthumous repatriation stimulated a cultural renewal within the community from which he came, exposing the roots of present social and economic injustices experienced by indigenous Australians.

THE OUTLAWS OF THE WILD WEST 150 Westerns in One Edition

... Oregon Trail Tales, Famous Outlaw Classics, Gold Rush Adventures & more (Including Riders of the Purple Sage, The Night Horseman, The Last of the Mohicans, Rimrock Trail. ... Does she think we're a lot of wild men from Borneo?

THE OUTLAWS OF THE WILD WEST  150  Westerns in One Edition

This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Contents: Introduction Story of the Cowboy Story of the Outlaw Novels & Stories Riders of the Purple Sage Saga (Zane Grey) Ohio River Trilogy Dan Barry Series (Max Brand) The Virginian (Owen Wister) Lin McLean Leatherstocking Series (James F. Cooper) Flying U Series (B. M. Bower) Cabin Fever Rimrock Trail (J. Allan Dunn) Breckinridge Elkins Series (Robert E. Howard) In a Hollow of the Hills (Bret Harte) Roughing It (Mark Twain) Outcasts of Poker Flat Call of the Wild (Jack London) Heart of the West (O. Henry) White Fang Wolf Hunters (James Oliver Curwood) Gold Hunters Last of the Plainsmen Border Legion Smoke Bellew Country Beyond Lone Star Ranger Ronicky Doone Trilogy Riders of the Silences Three Partners Man of the Forest Lure of the Dim Trails Tennessee's Partner Covered Wagon (Emerson Hough) Luck of Roaring Camp Rustlers of Pecos County Pike Bearfield Series O Pioneers! (Willa Cather) My Ántonia Log of a Cowboy (Andy Adams) Two-Gun Man (Charles Alden Seltzer) Short Cut (Jackson Gregory) Astoria (Washington Irving) Ungava (R.M. Ballantyne) Valley of Silent Men Black Jack Whispering Smith (Frank H. Spearman) A Texas Cow Boy (Charles Siringo) Trail Horde Golden Dream (Ballantyne) Blue Hotel (Stephen Crane) Long Shadow Girl from Montana (Grace Livingston Hill) Hidden Children (Robert W. Chambers) Where the Trail Divides Desert Trail (Dane Coolidge) Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Hidden Water…

Western Classics Zane Grey Collection 27 Novels in One Edition

Sure they're goin' to break soon, an' then we'll hev a couple of wild Texas steers ridin' the range. I've a heap to worry me. ... Does she think we're a lot of wild men from Borneo?" "Evidently she does. I rather think she is in for a ...

Western Classics  Zane Grey Collection  27 Novels in One Edition

This unique collection of "Western Classics: Zane Grey Collection (27 Novels in One Edition)” has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards. Table of Contents: Betty Zane The Spirit of the Border: A Romance of the Early Settlers in the Ohio Valley The Last of the Plainsmen The Last Trail The Heritage of the Desert The Young Forester The Young Lion Hunter Riders of the Purple Sage Desert Gold The Light of the Western Stars The Rustlers of Pecos County The Lone Star Ranger: A Romance of the Border Rainbow Trail The Border Legion Wildfire The UP Trail The Desert of Wheat The Man of the Forest The Mysterious Rider To the Last Man The Day of the Beast Wanderer of the Wasteland Tappan's Burro Roping Lions in the Grand Canyon The Code of the West Valley of Wild Horses The Fugitive Trail Tales of Lonely Trails (Author's Account of American Wild West Trails) Zane Grey (1872-1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and stories that were a basis for the Western genre in literature and the arts. With his veracity and emotional intensity, he connected with millions of readers worldwide, during peacetime and war, and inspired many Western writers who followed him. Grey was a major force in shaping the myths of the Old West; his books and stories were adapted into other media, such as film and TV productions. He was the author of more than 90 books, some published posthumously and/or based on serials originally published in magazines.