The Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb -

The Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb -

Charles Lamb (1775-1834) was an English essayist with Welsh heritage, best known for his Essays of Elia and for the children's book Tales from Shakespeare (1807), which he produced along with his sister, Mary Lamb (1764-1847). Charles and Mary both suffered periods of mental illness, and Charles spent six weeks in a psychiatric hospital during 1795. He was, however, already making his name as a poet. Despite Lamb's bouts of melancholia, both he and his sister enjoyed an active and rich social life. Their London quarters became a kind of weekly salon for many of the most outstanding theatrical and literary figures of the day. On her own, Mary Lamb published an epistolary work, Mrs Leicester's School (1809) which the poet Samuel Coleridge believed would and should be "acknowledged as a rich jewel in the treasury of our permanent English literature. " Among their other famous works are: Specimens of English Dramatic Poets (1808) and Poetry for Children (1809).

The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb

1801–1809

The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb

All of the available letters of Charles Lamb, a master of the English essay, and his sister Mary Anne published in this definitive, scrupulously edited work. The letters, many of them written to illustrious figures of the Romantic period, are generally agreed to rank among the finest in the English language. Transcribing where possible from the originals or facsimiles, Professor Marrs corrects textual errors found in previous editions, and he pays particular attention to establishing precise dates for the correspondence. He includes letters that were omitted from the last collection (published in 1935 and long out of print), and he has uncovered more than eighty letters never published before. The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb totals five or six volumes, and presents nearly 1200 letters written by Charles and Mary, singly or together. The correspondence is fully annotated, the volumes are illustrated, and the holographic idiosyncrasies of the originals are rendered typographically wherever possible. Rich in revelations about the extraordinary lives of the Lambs, these beautifully written letters are an inexhaustible store of information about the Romantic era and its major figures-Wordsworth, Keats, and Coleridge. The publication of unexpurgated and authoritative texts is an important literary event.

Lectures and Essays: The letters of Charles Lamb. How I traced Charles Lamb in Hertfordshire. Nether Stowey. Coleridge's ode to Wordsworth. The death of Tennyson. The secret of charm in literature. The influence of Chaucer upon his successors. The illiterate peasant. Some aspects of Mr. Stephen Phillips's new tragedy [Paolo and Francesca]. Mr. Dickens's amateur theatricals. Charles James Mathews. True and false humour in literature. Sir George Rose. The art of conversation. The teaching of English literature. Books and their uses

Lectures and Essays: The letters of Charles Lamb. How I traced Charles Lamb in Hertfordshire. Nether Stowey. Coleridge's ode to Wordsworth. The death of Tennyson. The secret of charm in literature. The influence of Chaucer upon his successors. The illiterate peasant. Some aspects of Mr. Stephen Phillips's new tragedy [Paolo and Francesca]. Mr. Dickens's amateur theatricals. Charles James Mathews. True and false humour in literature. Sir George Rose. The art of conversation. The teaching of English literature. Books and their uses