The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1931 36

The most popular author of his day and a paradox who was both an assertive British imperialist and a man of sensitivity and wide reading, Rudyard Kipling is best remembered now as the author of The Jungle Book, the Just-So Stories, and Kim.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1931 36

The most popular author of his day and a paradox who was both an assertive British imperialist and a man of sensitivity and wide reading, Rudyard Kipling is best remembered now as the author of The Jungle Book, the Just-So Stories, and Kim. Fully annotated, volumes 5 and 6 conclude the publication of Kipling's letters, a heroic effort that began with the publication of volume 1 in 1990.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1931 36

Rudyard Kipling Thomas Pinney. 1 Home Rule Bill , IV , 104 , 212 ,. De Ligne , Madame , V , 190 Delme - Radcliffe , General Sir Charles , IV , 456 , 457,458,460 , 462 Del Sarto , Andrea , V , 269 Delysia , Alice , IV , 315 , 316 ...

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1931 36

The most popular author of his day and a paradox who was both an assertive British imperialist and a man of sensitivity and wide reading, Rudyard Kipling is best remembered now as the author of The Jungle Book, the Just-So Stories, and Kim. Fully annotated, volumes 5 and 6 conclude the publication of Kipling's letters, a heroic effort that began with the publication of volume 1 in 1990.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1920 30

Rudyard Kipling Thomas Pinney. published in New York by Walter J. Black , without date . Stewart and Yeats , Bibliographical Catalogue , p . 409 , date it 1928 , though 1927 is perhaps likelier . The book , of 1003 doublecolumned pages ...

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1920 30

The most popular author of his day and a paradox who was both an assertive British imperialist and a man of sensitivity and wide reading, Rudyard Kipling is best remembered now as the author of The Jungle Book, the Just-So Stories, and Kim. Fully annotated, volumes 5 and 6 conclude the publication of Kipling's letters, a heroic effort that began with the publication of volume 1 in 1990.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1911 19

Rudyard Kipling Thomas Pinney. 11. The house at Dudwell Farm was occupied on 20 September by a Mr Warburton and his wife . He was not a navy man but a Canadian " fighting in a Manchester regiment " ( Rees extracts ) . 12.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1911 19

The fourth volume of Rudyard Kipling's letters, now collected and edited for the first time, continues the story of his life from the end of the Edwardian era through the Great War, a crisis in Kipling's life as well as in that of the world. The years before the war saw the publication of Rewards and Fairies and Songs from Books. In politics, the great issue was Irish home rule and the fate of Ulster. At the outbreak of the war Kipling devoted himself to the struggle. He wrote patriotic verse, made recruiting speeches, and traveled as a correspondent to the French and Italian fronts. He published no new fiction, only what he wrote as correspondent and propagandist: France at War, The Fringes of the Fleet, and The Eyes of Asia. In 1915 his only son, John, was killed in the Battle of Loos; at the same time Kipling began to suffer from the undiagnosed ulcer that would torment him for the rest of his life. His last volume of poems, The Years Between, published in 1919, embodies the suffering and bitterness of these years.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling

... Caroline: see Mrs Rudyard Kipling Balestier, Josephine, 44 Dalestier, Mai, 160 Balestier, Marjorie, 91 Balestier, Wolcott, 30 letter to: 20 August 1891 Balfour, 1st Earl, 281 Balfour, Colonel Eustace, 285 letter to:9 July 1897 Barr, ...

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling

Kipling's letters, never before collected and edited and largely unpublished, are now presented in an annotated edition based on the more than 6,000 letters preserved in public and private collections all over the world. Planned in an edition of four volumes, the Letters reveal Kipling with a fullness and immediacy of detail unmatched by any other source. The first two volumes present the first half of Kipling's life, down to the end of the nineteenth century. They show the remarkable transformation of the young schoolboy into the seasoned Indian journalist, and the even more remarkable transformation of the Indian journalist into the famous writer, the most dazzling literary success of the 1890s. Kipling's hard years of apprenticeship, his restless travels and eager encounters with cities and men, his triumphant struggles in the literary wars, are all vividly set forth. The Letters also take Kipling through his marriage and the births of his children, through the mingled happiness and distress of his American years, to the tragedy of his daughter's death at the very highest moment of his literary fame.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling

... but these poems were dropped when the Letters were collected in Letters of Travel (1892–1913). With new titles, and some revision, the poems are collected in Songs from Books and in Rudyard Kipling's Verse: Definitive Edition, 1940.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling

'The letters bring the man marvellously alive...a perfect bedside book and an important contribution to Kipling scholarship.' - Ian McIntyre, Times Volume 3 of Kipling's Letters covers the decade 1900-10, the years in which Kipling published Kim, Just So Stories, The Five Nations, Traffics and Discoveries, Puck of Pook's Hill, Actions and Reactions, and Rewards and Fairies. The narrative of his life includes the years in South Africa during and after the Boer War, his move to Bateman's in Sussex, his increasing involvement in the politics of preparedness and the growing record of his honours, culminating in the Nobel Prize.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1872 89

Rudyard Kipling, Thomas Pinney. Craik, Mary, 14 Craster, Shafto Longfield, 32 Crawford, Charles Edward Gordon, 144 Crawford, Mrs Charles Edward Gordon, 144 Crofts, William Carr, 46 letters to: 14 November 1883; 20 December 1885; ...

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1872 89

Selected, edited, and annotated, the first volume of Kipling's letters (305-5) covers the period from 1872 to 1889, tracing his transition from schoolboy thrust early into adulthood to journalist in the Punjab, and on to his subsequent triumphant return to England. The second volume (306-3) covers the period from 1890 to 1899--pivotal years for Kipling: he becomes a celebrity--the most dazzling literary success of the 1890s--a married man, a father, and a homeowner. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling

Very sincerely Rudyard Kipling . George B. Richards Esq . Notes 1. Not identified . In the University of Texas catalogue this letter is described as addressed to “ George Richardson " . The name as RK has written it at the end of the ...

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling


The Cambridge Companion to Rudyard Kipling

Kipling, Letters ofTravel, pp. 34–5. Kipling, Something of Myself, p. 117; Kipling, Letters of Travel, p. 185. Rudyard Kipling, A Book of Words (london: Macmillan, 1928), p. 196. Written in 1899 with both Boer and Spanish American wars ...

The Cambridge Companion to Rudyard Kipling

An overview of Kipling's work, his career and postcolonial views on his often controversial position on imperialism.

Rudyard Kipling

3. The Letters of Rudyard Kipling, ed. Thomas Pinney (Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press, 1990–2005), 1: 133. 4. Lord Birkenhead, Rudyard Kipling (New York: Random House, 1978), 76. 5. Letters, 1: 197. 6. Letter of May 15, 1888.

Rudyard Kipling

VictorianStudies on theWebCritics Choice!Rudyard Kipling: Hell and Heroism is an exploration of two fundamental yet greatly neglected aspects of the author's life and writings: his deep-seated pessimism and his complex creed of heroism. The method of the book is both biographical and critical. Biographically, it traces the roots of Kipling's dark worldview and his search for something to believe in, a way of thinking and acting in defiance of life's hellishness. There matters were more basic to him than any of his social or political opinions, but this the first full-length study devoted to them. Critically, the book takes a fresh and close look at some of Kipling's most important works. The result challenges long established assumptions and amounts to a major reconsideration of novels like Kim and stories like "Mary Postgate" and "The Gardener." Central in these discussions of individual writings is Kipling's concern with the heroic life, but of equal importance is the analysis and evaluation of them as works of art. Avoiding the tangled and special language of some recent literary theory, this will appeal to a wide audience of those interested in Kipling's mind and art.

Politics and Awe in Rudyard Kipling s Fiction

Kipling's “ Law " : A Study of His Philosophy of Life . London : Unwin , 1975 . ... Krishna , Francine E. Rudyard Kipling : His Apprenticeship . ... ( 1990 ) The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 176 Politics and Awe in Rudyard Kipling's Fiction.

Politics and Awe in Rudyard Kipling s Fiction

Peter Havholm blends knowledge of political battles in 1880s British India with close readings of well-known works like 'The Man Who Would Be King', 'Kim', and 'The Light That Failed' to connect Rudyard Kipling's continuing popularity with his youthful discovery that British India could be fictionalized as wondrous. Havholm's reading both acknowledges Kipling's artistic achievement and illuminates the continuing allure of the imperialist fantasy.

Kipling in India India in Kipling

6 The Swinburne Letters, vol. 5: 1883–1890, ed. Cecil. Y. Lang (New Haven, Yale University Press, 1962), 7 The Letters of Rudyard Kipling, vol 1: 1872–89, ed. Thomas Pinney (London: Macmillan, 1990), p. 71. 8 The Cambridge Edition of ...

Kipling in India  India in Kipling

This book explores and re-evaluates Kipling’s connection with India, its people, culture, languages, and locales through his experiences and his writings. Kipling’s works attracted interest among a large section of the British public, stimulating curiosity in their far-off Indian Empire, and made many canonize him as an emblem of the ‘Raj’. This volume highlights the astonishing social and thematic range of his Indian writings as represented in The Jungle Books; Kim; his early verse; his Simla-based tales of Anglo-Indian intrigues and love affairs; his stories of the common Indian people; and his journalism. It brings together different theoretical and contextual readings of Kipling to examine how his experience of India influenced his creative work and conversely how his imperial loyalties conditioned his creative engagement with India. The 18 chapters here engage with the complexities and contradictions in his writings and analyse the historical and political contexts in which he wrote them, and the contexts in which we read him now. With well-known contributors from different parts of the world – including India, the UK, the USA, Canada, France, Japan, and New Zealand – this book will be of great interest not only to those interested in Kipling’s life and works but also to researchers and scholars of nineteenth-century literature, comparative studies, postcolonial and subaltern studies, colonial history, and cultural studies.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling 1920 30

This fifth volume of The Letters of Rudyard Kipling, fully annotated, is one of six volumes which form the first comprehensive publication of Kipling's letters. This volume focuses on Kipling's life through the post-war decade of the 1920s.

The Letters of Rudyard Kipling  1920 30

This fifth volume of The Letters of Rudyard Kipling, fully annotated, is one of six volumes which form the first comprehensive publication of Kipling's letters. This volume focuses on Kipling's life through the post-war decade of the 1920s.

Kipling

1984) pp 210–11 176 Pinney, Letters, vol 3, p 11 177 The polished version from The Works of Rudyard Kipling is used, which shows slight differences from the version in Kim and is expanded by another three stanzas 178 Carrie's Diaries, ...

Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was the greatest writer in a Britain that ruled the largest empire the world has known, yet he was always a controversial figure, as deeply hated as he was loved. This accessible biography aims at an understanding of the man behind the image and gives an explanation of his enduring popularity

Rudyard Kipling

They tell me it was a man of the name of Kipling made ye; but indeed and they can't fool me; it was the Lord God Almighty that ... Letters: Vol. I, p. I 58: 'We'll tell you all about Rudyard Kipling~your nascent rival; he has killed one ...

Rudyard Kipling

This set comprises 40 volumes covering 19th and 20th century European and American authors. These volumes will be available as a complete set, mini boxed sets (by theme) or as individual volumes. This second set compliments the first 68 volume set of Critical Heritage published by Routledge in October 1995.

Letters of Note Fathers

LETTER 23 I AM AWFULLY COMFORTABLE Rudyard Kipling, John Kipling and Colonel Lionel Charles Dunsterville 1915 When World War I broke out in 1914, fiercely patriotic The Jungle Book author Rudyard Kipling encouraged his ...

Letters of Note  Fathers

In Letters of Note: Fathers, Shaun Usher collects together remarkable correspondence by and about fathers, including proud parental words of love, advice from experienced dads to new ones, as well as letters from both frustrated and adoring offspring. Includes letters by: Anne Frank, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jawaharlal Nehru, Groucho Marx, Che Guevara, Ted Hughes Katherine Mansfield, Fergal Keane, Arthur Conan Doyle, Samuel Bernstein & many more

The Peculiar Sanity of War

Rudyard Kipling to Herbert Baillie , 12 January 1916 , The Letters of Rudyard Kipling , ed . Thomas Pinney , 4 vols . to date ( Iowa City : Univ . of Iowa Press , 1999 ) , 4 : 355-6 . 60. See the editor's note in The Letters of Rudyard ...

The Peculiar Sanity of War

During wartime, paranoia, gossip, and rumor become accepted forms of behavior and dominant literary tropes. The Peculiar Sanity of War examines the impact of war hysteria on definitions of sanity and on standards of behavior during World War I. Drawing upon Joseph Conrad's comprehensive understanding of war's impact on soldiers and civilians alike, and extending Michel Foucault's construction of madness and reason, Kingsbury expands the definition of war neurosis to include peculiar sanity at home as well as on the front lines. While other investigations of World War I consider shell shock to be the only definable war madness, Kingsbury is the first to build a powerful argument around the insanity of the home front's vilification of the enemy. Ultimately, Kingsbury's study establishes peculiar sanity, among civilians and soldiers, as an inevitable response to war's madness. The Peculiar Sanity of War begins by locating the roots of war mania in Edwardian hypocrisy, then moves on to examine the way propaganda operates in nontraditional texts, such as housekeeping guides, and in the novels of Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, H. G. Wells, Rebecca West, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Rudyard Kipling, Virginia Woolf, and H. D. Celia Kingsbury's eloquent and moving book . . . brings together war and madness in unexpected ways. Beginning with a phrase from Joseph Conrad, she diagnoses the condition of a culture gone awry, a 'peculiar sanity.' . . . --from Laurence Davies's foreword

The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson

Good - bye , my dear James ; find an hour to write to us , and register your letter . Yours affectionately , R. L. S. TO RUDYARD KIPLING In 1890 , on first becoming acquainted with Mr. Kipling's Soldiers Three , Stevenson had written ...

The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson


How the Just So Stories Were Made

For an excellent account of this see Charles Allen, Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling (London: Little, Brown, 2007), pp. 164–74 (hereafter cited as Charles Allen, 2007). 25. Quoted from a letter to Edmonia Hill, ...

How the Just So Stories Were Made

A fascinating, richly illustrated exploration of the poignant origins of Rudyard Kipling’s world-famous children’s classic From "How the Leopard Got Its Spots" to "The Elephant’s Child," Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories have delighted readers across the world for more than a century. In this original study, John Batchelor explores the artistry with which Kipling created the Just So Stories, using each tale as an entry point into the writer’s life and work—including the tragedy that shadows much of the volume, the death of his daughter Josephine. Batchelor details the playful challenges the stories made to contemporary society. In his stories Kipling played with biblical and other stories of creation and imagined fantastical tales of animals' development and man's discovery of literacy. Richly illustrated with original drawings and family photographs, this account reveals Kipling’s public and private lives—and sheds new light on a much-loved and tremendously influential classic.