The Life of R H Tawney

Based on papers deposited at the London School of Economics including a collection of personal material previously held by his family, this book provides the first detailed biography.

The Life of R  H  Tawney

R. H. Tawney was the most influential theorist and exponent of socialism in Britain in the 20th century and also a leading historian. Based on papers deposited at the London School of Economics including a collection of personal material previously held by his family, this book provides the first detailed biography. Lawrence Goldman shows that to understand Tawney's work it is necessary to understand his life. This biography takes a broadly chronological approach, and uses this framework to examine major themes, including Tawney's political thought and historical writings. Tawney was the most representative of Labour's intellectuals as well as the most influential, and the contradictions he embodied are evident in the general history of British socialism.

The Life of R H Tawney

Hugh Gaitskell' in R. H. Tawney, The Radical Tradition (ed. R. Hinden) (London, 1964), 214. See above, 122. Ronald Preston, 'R. H. Tawney as a Christian Moralist. 3', Theology, vol. lxix, May 1966, 265—9.

The Life of R  H  Tawney

R. H. Tawney was the most influential theorist and exponent of socialism in Britain in the 20th century and also a leading historian. Based on papers deposited at the London School of Economics including a collection of personal material previously held by his family, this book provides the first detailed biography. Lawrence Goldman shows that to understand Tawney's work it is necessary to understand his life. This biography takes a broadly chronological approach, and uses this framework to examine major themes, including Tawney's political thought and historical writings. Tawney was the most representative of Labour's intellectuals as well as the most influential, and the contradictions he embodied are evident in the general history of British socialism.

R H Tawney and His Times

"As long as men are men," Tawney said, "a poor society cannot be too poor to find a right order of life, nor a rich society too rich to have need to seek it." This book is a blend of biography, history, and the study of political ideas.

R H  Tawney and His Times

Economic historian, democratic socialist, educator, and British labor party activist, R. H. Tawney touched many worlds. His life, too, spanned great distance and change. When he was born in Calcutta in 1880, Gladstone, Tennyson, and Queen Victoria were flourishing and the British Empire was approaching its height. By the time of his death in 1962, the Empire had shrunk to a few tourist islands, and socialism, once so shocking, was now commonplace. Ross Terrill, in this absorbing first study of Tawney's thought, view his subject within three related contexts. The first is Tawney, the man. Terrill makes skillful use of unpublished material--the early diary, speech and lecture notes, letters, interviews with friends and associates--to tell the story of Tawney's life in relation to his times. Second is social democracy. Tawney was one of its most influential philosophers and prophets, and this book argues for the continuing validity of his socialism as a path between capitalism and communism. Third is British politics. From Edwardian liberal "consensus" to mid-century collectivist "consensus," Tawney's long career, often at odds with prevailing orthodoxies, offers a window on British political culture. Four key ideas are found in Tawney's political thought: equality and the dispersion of power--the "shape of socialism"; function and citizenship--the "life of socialism." These ideas, and indeed the life of the man himself, Terrill believes, are summed up in socialism as fellowship. "As long as men are men," Tawney said, "a poor society cannot be too poor to find a right order of life, nor a rich society too rich to have need to seek it." This book is a blend of biography, history, and the study of political ideas. It provides a striking portrait of a remarkable man and a panorama of changing ideas and situations in the society where he tried to realize his socialist vision. It offers many glimpses of Tawney's associates, among them Beveridge, the Webbs, Laski, A. P. Wadsworth, Temple, Margaret Cole, and Leonard Woolf; and surprising snippets, like the fact that Tawney used the phrase "private affluence and public squalor" in 1919.

R H Tawney s Commonplace Book

Richard Henry Tawney was a man of deep Christian beliefs and powerful emotions, and nowhere can we gain as full a view of his mind and temperament, of the limitations of his ideas as well as their strengths, as in the Commonplace Book or ...

R  H  Tawney s Commonplace Book

Richard Henry Tawney was a man of deep Christian beliefs and powerful emotions, and nowhere can we gain as full a view of his mind and temperament, of the limitations of his ideas as well as their strengths, as in the Commonplace Book or diary which he kept at Manchester from 1912 to 1914. This document is a unique record of the assumptions which supported Tawney's life long work as a socialist and as a scholar. The pattern of his historical interests and, in embryonic form, the outline of many of the arguments which he later developed in his three most influential books, The Acquisitive Society (1921), Religion and the Rise of Capitalism (1926), and Equality (1931), clearly emerge from the pages of this pre-war diary. He appears therein as a man engaged in the exploration of the internal world of his Christian beliefs; and also vigorously seeking to relate them to social and economic life. Though written sixty years ago, this private diary of a remarkable man of powerful moral convictions is no less pertinent today than it was then.

The Authentic Tawney

This book provides a fresh and accessible guide to the ideas of Tawney for new readers and to set straight the record of what Tawney’s political thought really is, warts and all, in place of the rather over-simplified picture painted by ...

The Authentic Tawney

R.H. Tawney is an iconic thinker in British left-wing circles, whose writings during the early-mid 20th century helped to forge the direction of democratic socialist thinking and Labour Party policies. This book provides a fresh and accessible guide to the ideas of Tawney for new readers and to set straight the record of what Tawney’s political thought really is, warts and all, in place of the rather over-simplified picture painted by the major commentators. It shows how Tawney’s ideas changed over nearly 40 years of writing, as his own life experiences and the traumatic events of the two World Wars and their aftermaths drew him to a more secular and practical interpretation of politics. The book renders a service to scholarship, being based on original research, including examination of the Tawney Archive at the LSE, and makes use of unpublished works of Tawney.

Forgotten Wives

W. H. Beveridge to R. H. Tawney, 31 August 1958, BevP 2A/108. J. Tawney, I Learn to Live, Chapter 15, TP/TV 21. J. Tawney, I Learn to Live, Chapter 18, TP/TV 21. Harris, J. (1977) William Beveridge: A Biography, Oxford: Clarendon Press, ...

Forgotten Wives

Throughout history, records of women's lives and work have been lost through the pervasive assumption of male dominance. Wives, especially, disappear as supporters of their husbands’ work, as unpaid and often unacknowledged secretaries and research assistants, and as managers of men’s domestic domains; even intellectual collaboration tends to be portrayed as normative wifely behaviour rather than as joint work. Forgotten Wives examines the ways in which the institution and status of marriage has contributed to the active ‘disremembering’ of women’s achievements. Drawing on archives, biographies, autobiographies and historical accounts, best-selling author and academic Ann Oakley interrogates conventions of history and biography-writing using the case studies of four women married to well-known men – Charlotte Shaw, Mary Booth, Jeannette Tawney and Janet Beveridge. Asking critical questions about the mechanisms that maintain gender inequality, despite thriving feminist and other equal rights movements, she contributes a fresh vision of how the welfare state developed in the early 20th century.

Social Democracy in the Making

Twentieth-Century Christian (New York: Seabury Press, 1963), 234–242; Lawrence Goldman, The Life of R. H. Tawney: Socialism and History (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), 18. My discussion of Temple contains condensed summaries of my ...

Social Democracy in the Making

An expansive and ambitious intellectual history of democratic socialism from one of the world's leading intellectual historians and social ethicists The fallout from twenty years of neoliberal economic globalism has sparked a surge of interest in the old idea of democratic socialism--a democracy in which the people control the economy and government, no group dominates any other, and every citizen is free, equal, and included. With a focus on the intertwined legacies of Christian socialism and Social Democratic politics in Britain and Germany, this book traces the story of democratic socialism from its birth in the nineteenth century through the mid-1960s. Examining the tenets on which the movement was founded and how it adapted to different cultural, religious, and economic contexts from its beginnings through the social and political traumas of the twentieth century, Gary Dorrien reminds us that Christian socialism paved the way for all liberation theologies that make the struggles of oppressed peoples the subject of redemption. He argues for a decentralized economic democracy and anti-imperial internationalism.

Welfare and Social Policy in Britain Since 1870

Goldman, The Life of R. H. Tawney, 16–17. 21 Goldman, The Life of R. H. Tawney, 17. 22 William Beveridge, 'Oxford from Jowett to Today' (nd), Beveridge Papers, 10/10/19, f. 1. 23 Goldman, The Life of R. H. Tawney, 17–18.

Welfare and Social Policy in Britain Since 1870

This collection of twelve essays reviews the history of welfare in Britain over the past 150 years. It focuses on the ideas that have shaped the development of British social policy, and on the thinkers who have inspired and also contested the welfare state. It thereby constructs an intellectual history of British welfare since the concept first emerged at the end of the nineteenth century. The essays divide into four sections. The first considers the transition from laissez-faire to social liberalism from the 1870s, and the enduring impact of late-Victorian philosophical idealism on the development of the welfare state. It focuses on the moral philosophy of T. H. Green and his influence on key figures in the history of British social policy like William Beveridge, R. H. Tawney, and William Temple. The second section is devoted to the concept of 'planning' which was once, in the mid-twentieth century, at the heart of social policy and its implementation, but which has subsequently fallen out of favour. A third section examines the intellectual debate over the welfare state since its creation in the 1940s. Though a consensus seemed to have emerged during the Second World War over the desirability and scope of a welfare state extending 'from the cradle to the grave', libertarian and conservative critiques endured and re-emerged a generation later. A final section examines social policy and its implementation more recently, both at grass roots level in a study of community action in West London in the districts made infamous by the fire at Grenfell Tower in 2017, and at a systemic level where different models of welfare provision are shown to be in uneasy co-existence today. The collection is a tribute to Jose Harris, emeritus professor of history in the University of Oxford and a pioneer of the intellectual history of social policy. Taken together, these essays conduct the reader through the key phases and debates in the history of British welfare.

R H Tawney

This turns on the alleged consequences for the life of society of the principles and programme he recommends . Just as his diagnosis of the malady of modern society combined an argument about moral sickness with an attribution to this ...

R H  Tawney


Neville Figgis CR His Life Thought and Significance

But there are two major difficulties with this very positive presentation of Figgis. The first comes from Tim Rogan's The Moral Economists.19 This study of R. H. Tawney, Karl Polanyi and E. P. Thompson, as among the most formidable ...

Neville Figgis  CR  His Life  Thought and Significance

In this book, eminent scholars expound and critique the thought of the brilliant but neglected Anglican theologian, historian, political thinker and preacher John Neville Figgis, CR (1866-1919) and explore his significance for our times.

Richard Titmuss

1 2 D. Marquand, 'R.H. Tawney: Prophet of Equality', The Guardian, 26 November 1960, p 6. ... 9 August 1960, RMT to Williams; for a sympathetic reappraisal of Jeanette Tawney, L. Goldman The Life of R.H. Tawney: Socialism and History, ...

Richard Titmuss

This is the first full-length biography of Richard Titmuss, a pioneer of social policy research and an influential figure in Britain’s post-war welfare debates. Drawing on his own papers, publications, and interviews with those who knew him, the book discusses Titmuss’s ideas, particularly those around the principles of altruism and social solidarity, as well as his role in policy and academic networks at home and overseas. It is an enlightening portrait of a man who deepened our understanding of social problems as well as the policies that respond most effectively to them.

Education for Democracy in England in World War II

Andrew Rosen, The Transformation of British Life 1950–2000 (Glasgow: Bell & Bain Ltd., 2003), 68. Wright, R. H. Tawney, 99. Ibid., 98. Simon, The Politics of Educational Reform, 1920–1940, 63; Nigel Haslewood, 'Tawney, The Labour Party ...

Education for Democracy in England in World War II

Education for Democracy in England in World War II examines the educational discourse and involvement in wartime educational reforms of five important figures: Fred Clarke, R. H. Tawney, Shena Simon, H. C. Dent and Ernest Simon. These figures campaigned for educational reforms through their books, publishing articles in newspapers, delivering speeches at schools and conferences and by organizing pressure groups. Going beyond the literature in this key period, the book focuses on exploring the relationship between democratic ideals and reform proposals in each figure’s arguments. Displaying a variety of democratic forums for debates about education beyond parliament, the book re-interprets wartime educational reforms from a different perspective and illustrates the agreements and contradictions in the educational discourse itself.

The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics

History and Society: Essays by R.H. Tawney. ... 'Preface to the 1937 Edition'. In Religion and the Rise of Capitalism. London: Penguin: vii–xiii. Tawney, R.H. ... Goldman, L. (2013). The Life of R.H. Tawney: Socialism and 286 N. Thompson.

The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics

The London School of Economics (LSE) has been and continues to be one of the most important global centres for economics. With six chapters on themes in LSE economics and 29 chapters on the lives and work of LSE economists, this volume shows how economics became established at the School, how it produced some of the world’s best-known economists, including Lionel Robbins and Bill Phillips, plus Nobel Prize winners, such as Friedrich Hayek, John Hicks and Christopher Pissarides, and how it remains a global force for the very best in teaching and research in economics. With original contributions from a stellar cast, this volume provides economists – especially those interested in macroeconomics and the history of economic thought – with the first in-depth analysis of LSE economics.

History and Society

Taken together, these essays demonstrate the validity of Tawney’s conviction that economic historians must confront not only the creation of wealth, but also the moral questions surrounding its distribution.

History and Society

R. H. Tawney believed that the subject of economic history raises questions which touch the fundamental concerns of all thinking people. By setting economic development firmly within the framework of cultural and political life, he provided an alternative to the recent fragmentation of economic history into a number of increasingly technical specialisms. First published as a collection in 1978, these ten essays, spanning the length of Professor Tawney’s career remain as controversial and potent as ever, and the original introduction by J. M. Winter provides the first full evaluation and significance of R. H. Tawney’s approach to economic history. Among the essays included in this volume are the indispensible studies of ‘The Rise of the Gentry’ and ‘Harrington’s Interpretation of His Age’, as well as ‘The Abolition of Economic Controls, 1918-1921’, here published in full for the first time. Other selections, such as Tawney’s celebrated inaugural lecture as Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics in 1933, ‘the Study of Economic History’, offer a representative sample of the range and sweep of Tawney’s historical imagination. Taken together, these essays demonstrate the validity of Tawney’s conviction that economic historians must confront not only the creation of wealth, but also the moral questions surrounding its distribution.

Routledge Encyclopaedia of Educational Thinkers

J.R. Brooks, 'R.H. Tawney and the Reform of English Education', unpublished PhD dissertation, University of Wales, 1974. Lawrence Goldman, The Life of R.H. Tawney. Socialism andHistory, London: Bloomsbury, 2013.

Routledge Encyclopaedia of Educational Thinkers

The Routledge Encyclopaedia of Educational Thinkers comprises 128 essays by leading scholars analysing the most important, influential, innovative and interesting thinkers on education of all time. Each of the chronologically arranged entries explores why a particular thinker is significant for those who study education and explores the social, historical and political contexts in which the thinker worked. Ranging from Confucius and Montessori to Dewey and Edward de Bono, the entries form concise, accessible summaries of the greatest or most influential educational thinkers of past and present times. Each essay includes the following features; concise biographical information on the individual, an outline of the individual’s key achievements and activities, an assessment of their impact and influence, a list of their major writings, suggested further reading. Carefully brought together to present a balance of gender and geographical contexts as well as areas of thought and work in the broad field of education, this substantial volume provides a unique history and overview of figures who have shaped education and educational thinking throughout the world. Combining and building upon two internationally renowned volumes, this collection is deliberately broad in scope, crossing centuries, boundaries and disciplines. The Encyclopaedia therefore provides a perfect introduction to the huge range and diversity of educational thought. Offering an accessible means of understanding the emergence and development of what is currently seen in the classroom, this Encyclopaedia is an invaluable reference guide for all students of education, including undergraduates and post-graduates in education or teacher training and students of related disciplines.

Histories of Everyday Life

The Report could not commit to vocational education proper as the alternative , due to the presence of committee members such as R. H. Tawney and Albert Mansbridge , both working - class education activists . In 1922 Tawney published ...

Histories of Everyday Life

This book is a social history of popular history in Britain between the end of the First World War and the 1970s. It considers how ordinary people were taught history through books, in school and museums, and on BBC radio.

Custom and Commercialisation in English Rural Society

A twentieth century life (London, 2002), pp. 110–11, 282–5. 10 Goldman, Life of R.H. Tawney, pp. 53–80. 11 M. Berg, A woman in history. Eileen Power 1889–1940 (Cambridge, 1996), pp. 150–3. 12 M.M. Postan, 'Hugh Gaitskell: political and ...

Custom and Commercialisation in English Rural Society

English rural society underwent fundamental changes between the thirteenth and eighteenth centuries with urbanization, commercialization and industrialization producing new challenges and opportunities for inhabitants of rural communities. However, our understanding of this period has been shaped by the compartmentalization of history into medieval and early-modern specialisms and by the debates surrounding the transition from feudalism to capitalism and landlord-tenant relations. Inspired by the classic works of Tawney and Postan, this collection of essays examines their relevance to historians today, distinguishing between their contrasting approaches to the pre-industrial economy and exploring the development of agriculture and rural industry; changes in land and property rights; and competition over resources in the English countryside.