The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air

" This masterful edition introduces one of Kierkegaard's most engaging and inspiring works to a new generation of readers.

The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus tells his followers to let go of earthly concerns by considering the lilies of the field and the birds of the air. Søren Kierkegaard's short masterpiece on this famous gospel passage draws out its vital lessons for readers in a rapidly modernizing and secularizing world. Trenchant, brilliant, and written in stunningly lucid prose, The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air (1849) is one of Kierkegaard's most important books. Presented here in a fresh new translation with an informative introduction, this profound yet accessible work serves as an ideal entrée to an essential modern thinker. The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air reveals a less familiar but deeply appealing side of the father of existentialism—unshorn of his complexity and subtlety, yet supremely approachable. As Kierkegaard later wrote of the book, "Without fighting with anybody and without speaking about myself, I said much of what needs to be said, but movingly, mildly, upliftingly." This masterful edition introduces one of Kierkegaard's most engaging and inspiring works to a new generation of readers.

Kierkegaard s Writings XVIII Volume 18

genuine; oh, I wish that I were like a bird of the air, like a lily in the field. But it is, of course, an impossibility that I would be able to become like them, and for this very reason the wish to be like them is so heartfelt, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XVIII  Volume 18

"Without authority," a phrase Kierkegaard repeatedly applied to himself and his writings, is an appropriate title for this volume of five short works that in various ways deal with the concept and practice of authority. The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air contemplates the teaching authority of these creatures based on three different passages in the Gospels. The first of Two Ethical-Religious Essays mediates on the ethics of Jesus' martyrdom; the second contrasts the authority of the genius with that of the apostle. The remaining works--Three Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1849), An Upbuilding Discourse (1850), and Two Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1851)--are meditations on sin, forgiveness, and the power of love.

Without Authority

Gregory R. Beabout Introduction The devotional writings that accompanied the second edition of Kierkegaard's Either/Or, The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air: Three Devotional Discourses, have been called "the most beautiful, ...

Without Authority

The phrase Without Authority is Soren Kierkegaard's way of designating his lack of clerical ordination and to raise the complex and central human issue of authority in human culture. Authors of the essays in IKC-18 demonstrate how Kierkegaard's literary genius, religious passion, and intellectual penetration handle with equal ease and acuity the lily of the field, the bird of the air, the sacrament of holy communion, and the concepts of martyr, witness, genius, prototype, and apostle to create a singular and 'authoritative' contribution to both theology and philosophy of religion.

Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits

5 Transformed by the Gospel: What We Learn about the Stages from the Lilies and the Birds Stephen N. Dunning "What We Learn from the Lilies in the Field and from the Birds in the Air" has certainly not generated much discussion among ...

Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits

"Just as Howard V. and Edna H. Hong's translation of Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits marked the first appearance of this complete title in English in a single volume, this collection of essays is the first to explore the fascinating and powerful compilation of Kierkegaard's writings that clearly initiate the "second authorship.""--BOOK JACKET.

The Lily s Tongue

The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air And Jesus called a little child unto him, and set him in the midst of them, And said, Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into ...

The Lily s Tongue

Examines four discourses by Kierkegaard, arguing that they play a critical and surprising role in his oeuvre and contribute to the philosophy of figural language. How do texts speak with authority? That is the question at the heart of Kierkegaard’s theory and practice of “indirect communication.” None of Kierkegaard’s texts respond to this question more concisely and powerfully than the four discourses he wrote about the lily in the Gospel. The Lily’s Tongue is a nuanced, sustained reading of these Lily Discourses. Kierkegaard takes the lilies as authoritative, rather than merely “figural” or “metaphorical.” This book is a careful exploration of what Kierkegaard means by this authority. Frances Maughan-Brown demonstrates how Kierkegaard argues that the key is in the act of reading itself—no text can have authority unless the reader grants it that authority because no text can entirely avoid figural language. Texts don’t speak directly; their tongue is always the lily’s tongue. What is revealed in the Lily Discourses is a groundbreaking theory of figure, which requires a renewed reading of Kierkegaard’s major pseudonymous works. Frances Maughan-Brown is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the College of the Holy Cross.

Kierkegaard Mimesis and Modernity

“The lily and the bird” are presented by Kierkegaard as a model that mitigates this problem and can successfully speak to ... themes—comprising The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air is subtitled “Look at the Birds of the Air; ...

Kierkegaard  Mimesis  and Modernity

This book challenges the widespread view of Kierkegaard’s idiosyncratic and predominantly religious position on mimesis. Taking mimesis as a crucial conceptual point of reference in reading Kierkegaard, this book offers a nuanced understanding of the relation between aesthetics and religion in his thought. Kaftanski shows how Kierkegaard's dialectical-existential reading of mimesis interlaces aesthetic and religious themes, including the familiar core concepts of imitation, repetition, and admiration as well as the newly arisen notions of affectivity, contagion, and crowd behavior. Kierkegaard’s enduring relevance to the malaises of our own day is firmly established by his classic concern for the meaning of human life informed by reflective meditation on the mimeticorigins of the contemporary age.​ Kierkegaard, Mimesis, and Modernity will be of interest to scholars and advanced students working on Kierkegaard, Continental philosophy, the history of aesthetics, and critical and religious studies.

Christian Discourses

the authorship the "joy" has remained faithfully unuttered for one or another (or both) of these reasons, but all of this appears to change dramatically in the third discourse of The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air.

Christian Discourses

Christian Discourses contains some of Kierkegaard's most constructive religious and social thought, founded on his deepening appreciation of the ambiguity of our common human situation before a loving yet commanding God. ""Christian Discourses"" is a collection of provocative arguments and insights which should redefine the approach to Kierkegaard's 'attack on Christendom' and provoke a useful debate about the significance of his 'second literature'.

Errant Affirmations

There is a paradox here: the lily of the field and the bird of the air lack what might seem, from the standpoint of the idealist metaphysics of modernity, at least, to constitute the unique ontological structure of the human: ...

Errant Affirmations

Kierkegaard's religious discourses - his writings which have explicitly dealt with religion - have historically been given scant attention by philosophers. They have generally been considered to be of less philosophical interest than his 'proper' philosophy. Errant Affirmations radically questions this claim and considers Kierkegaard's religious writings as absolutely central to his philosophical vision. Through close and clear readings of Kierkegaard's work, David Kangas argues that contemporary philosophical themes - gift, temporality, language, death, nothingness, economy and selfhood- are not only evident in the 'religious' works but explored with real depth and fascination. Above all, the book argues that Kierkegaard's positive account of the human condition, his “ontology,” fully emerges only in these discourses. It shows how these discourses are organized around an “errant” kind of affirmation-namely, an affirmation of existence that is without conditions. Such affirmation involves the intensification of life around “today” and coincides with a joy that has no particular cause. It is an affirmation capable of affirming life even amidst its finitude and suffering. Errant Affirmations is a fresh interpretation of Kierkegaard's understudied works that not only opens up a new reading of Kierkegaard but elucidates his 'religious' texts and places them organically within his philosophy as a whole.

The Coming Winter

169 Kierkegaard, The Lily of the Field and Bird of the Air, 17. 170 Kierkegaard, The Lily of the Field and Bird of the Air, 21. 171 Kierkegaard, The Lily of the Field and Bird of the Air, 18. 172 Kierkegaard, The Lily of the Field and ...

The Coming Winter

The Coming Winter is a work for pastors, by a pastor, about Paul, the pastor. The work seeks to integrate both a personal story of contemporary pastoral ministry within the rubric of Timothy’s story as a benefactor of Paul’s guidance in and through the epistle of 1 Timothy. The book seeks to guide the local church pastor through conflict management, polity, liturgy, and healing from woundedness.

The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible

The texts in question are the second (of three) parts of Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits (1847), entitled 'What we learn from the Lilies of the Field and the Birds of the Air'; the first (of four) parts of Christian Discourses ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible

This wide-ranging volume looks at the reception history of the Bible's many texts; Part I surveys the outline, form, and content of twelve key biblical books that have been influential in the history of interpretation. Part II offers a series of in-depth case studies of the interpretation of particular biblical passages or books.

Kierkegaard s Writings XVIII Volume 18

"Without authority," a phrase Kierkegaard repeatedly applied to himself and his writings, is an appropriate title for this volume of five short works that in various ways deal with the concept and practice of authority.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XVIII  Volume 18

"Without authority," a phrase Kierkegaard repeatedly applied to himself and his writings, is an appropriate title for this volume of five short works that in various ways deal with the concept and practice of authority. The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air contemplates the teaching authority of these creatures based on three different passages in the Gospels. The first of Two Ethical-Religious Essays mediates on the ethics of Jesus' martyrdom; the second contrasts the authority of the genius with that of the apostle. The remaining works--Three Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1849), An Upbuilding Discourse (1850), and Two Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1851)--are meditations on sin, forgiveness, and the power of love.

Kierkegaard s Theology of Encounter

In order to convey what it means to seek God's kingdom first, Kierkegaard directs his reader to the lilies of the field and the birds of the air: Only when the human being, although he works and spins, is just like the lily, ...

Kierkegaard s Theology of Encounter

Soren Kierkegaard's Theology of Encounter provides a theoretical framework that brings the unity of Kierkegaard's "middle period" into relief. David Lappano analyses Kierkegaard's writings between 1846 and 1852 when the socially constructive dimension of his thought comes to prominence, involving two dialectical aspects of religiousness identified by Kierkegaard: they are the edifying and the polemical. How these come together and get worked out in the lives of individuals form the basis of what can be called a Kierkegaardian "social praxis." Lappano argues that the tension between the edifying and the polemical can be coherently maintained in a communicative life that is also characteristic of a militant faith. This militant faith and life is presented as a critical guard against absolutisms, fundamentalisms, and intellectual aloofness; but the "militant" individual is also utterly dependent, in need of edification and critique, and therefore chooses the risk of encountering others, seeking relationships out of a commitment to the development of people and communities in co-operation. Therefore, not only does this dialectic provide readers with an important theoretical framework for understanding Kierkegaard's 'middle period', it is also a valuable resource for a constructive analysis of active social living suitable for theology in the twenty-first century.

Kierkegaard s Pastoral Dialogues

This dialogue draws on several of Kierkegaard's thirteen discourses on the theme ofthe lilies and the birds, especially the three published as a separate short volume The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air: Three Godly Discourses ...

Kierkegaard s Pastoral Dialogues

Takes a selection of Kierkegaard's most insightful spiritual wiritings and transforms them into a series of dialoges between two friends, a believer and a non-believer.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXI Volume 21

... deadly with anxiety, he draws our attention away from himself and directs it toward something else, almost as if it were encouragement, a diversion: “Consider the lilies of the field; look at the birds of the air.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXI  Volume 21

For Self-Examination and its companion piece Judge for Yourself! are the culmination of Søren Kierkegaard's "second authorship," which followed his Concluding Unscientific Postscript. Among the simplest and most readily comprehended of Kierkegaard's books, the two works are part of the signed direct communications, as distinguished from his earlier pseudonymous writings. The lucidity and pithiness, and the earnestness and power, of For Self-Examination and Judge for Yourself! are enhanced when, as Kierkegaard requested, they are read aloud. They contain the well-known passages on Socrates' defense speech, how to read, the lover's letter, the royal coachman and the carriage team, and the painter's relation to his painting. The aim of awakening and inward deepening is signaled by the opening section on Socrates in For Self-Examination and is pursued in the context of the relations of Christian ideality, grace, and response. The secondary aim, a critique of the established order, links the works to the final polemical writings that appear later after a four-year period of silence.

Heidegger on Death

In this spirit, then, I take as a critical counter to Heidegger's Hölderlin the poet described in Kierkegaard's three late (1849) upbuilding discourses collectively entitled The Lily of the Field and the Bird of the Air or, individually ...

Heidegger on Death

This book examines the question of death in the light of Heidegger's paradigmatic discussion in Being and Time. Although Heidegger's own treatment deliberately refrains from engaging theological perspectives, George Pattison suggests that these not only serve to bring out problematic elements in his own approach but also point to the larger human or anthropological issues in play. Pattison reveals where and how Heidegger and theology part ways but also how Heidegger can helpfully challenge theology to rethink one of its own fundamental questions: human beings' relation to their death and the meaning of death in their religious lives.

Volume 8 Tome III Kierkegaard s International Reception The Near East Asia Australia and the Americas

New Year's Day," which is the first part of Two Upbuilding Discourses from 1843, was translated in Mexico City in 1992.69 The Gospel of Sufferings was published in Mexico City in 1973.70 "The Lilies in the Field and the Birds of the Air ...

Volume 8  Tome III  Kierkegaard s International Reception     The Near East  Asia  Australia and the Americas

Although Kierkegaard's reception was initially more or less limited to Scandinavia, it has for a long time now been a highly international affair. As his writings were translated into different languages his reputation spread, and he became read more and more by people increasingly distant from his native Denmark. While in Scandinavia, the attack on the Church in the last years of his life became something of a cause célèbre, later, many different aspects of his work became the object of serious scholarly investigation well beyond the original northern borders. As his reputation grew, he was co-opted by a number of different philosophical and religious movements in different contexts throughout the world. The three tomes of this volume attempt to record the history of this reception according to national and linguistic categories. Tome III is the most geographically diverse, covering the Near East, Asia, Australia and the Americas. The section on the Near East features pioneering articles on the Kierkegaard reception in Israel, Turkey, Iran and the Arab world. The next section dubbed 'Asia and Australia' features articles on the long and rich traditions of Kierkegaard research in Japan and Korea along with the more recent ones in China and Australia. A final section is dedicated to Americas with articles on Canada, the United States, hispanophone South America, Mexico and Brazil.

Volume 15 Tome IV Kierkegaard s Concepts

The most detailed and explicit reflections on the concept of joy can be found in Christian Discourses, Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits, and The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air. It is possible to find nuances of the ...

Volume 15  Tome IV  Kierkegaard s Concepts

Kierkegaard’s Concepts is a comprehensive, multi-volume survey of the key concepts and categories that inform Kierkegaard’s writings. Each article is a substantial, original piece of scholarship, which discusses the etymology and lexical meaning of the relevant Danish term, traces the development of the concept over the course of the authorship, and explains how it functions in the wider context of Kierkegaard’s thought. Concepts have been selected on the basis of their importance for Kierkegaard’s contributions to philosophy, theology, the social sciences, literature and aesthetics, thereby making this volume an ideal reference work for students and scholars in a wide range of disciplines.

Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks Volume 8

No One Can Serve Two Masters] See Mt 6:24. the lily and the bird] Refers to Jesus' parable of the lily and the bird, ... See, “What We Learn from the Lilies of the Field and the Birds of the Air: Three Discourses,” the second part of ...

Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks  Volume 8

For over a century, the Danish thinker Søren Kierkegaard (1813–55) has been at the center of a number of important discussions, concerning not only philosophy and theology, but also, more recently, fields such as social thought, psychology, and contemporary aesthetics, especially literary theory. Despite his relatively short life, Kierkegaard was an extraordinarily prolific writer, as attested to by the 26-volume Princeton University Press edition of all of his published writings. But Kierkegaard left behind nearly as much unpublished writing, most of which consists of what are called his "journals and notebooks." Kierkegaard has long been recognized as one of history's great journal keepers, but only rather small portions of his journals and notebooks are what we usually understand by the term "diaries." By far the greater part of Kierkegaard’s journals and notebooks consists of reflections on a myriad of subjects—philosophical, religious, political, personal. Studying his journals and notebooks takes us into his workshop, where we can see his entire universe of thought. We can witness the genesis of his published works, to be sure—but we can also see whole galaxies of concepts, new insights, and fragments, large and small, of partially (or almost entirely) completed but unpublished works. Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks enables us to see the thinker in dialogue with his times and with himself. Kierkegaard wrote his journals in a two-column format, one for his initial entries and the second for the extensive marginal comments that he added later. This edition of the journals reproduces this format, includes several photographs of original manuscript pages, and contains extensive scholarly commentary on the various entries and on the history of the manuscripts being reproduced. Volume 8 of this 11-volume series includes five of Kierkegaard’s important "NB" journals (Journals NB21 through NB25), which cover the period from September 1850 to June 1852, and which show Kierkegaard alternately in polemical and reflective postures. The polemics emerge principally in Kierkegaard’s opposition to the increasing infiltration of Christianity by worldly concerns, a development that in his view had accelerated significantly in the aftermath of the political and social changes wrought by the Revolution of 1848. Kierkegaard understood the corrupting of Christianity to be in the interest of the powers that be, and he directed his criticism at politicians, the press, and especially the Danish Church itself, particularly church officials who claimed to be "reformers." On the reflective side, Kierkegaard delves into a number of authors and religious figures, some of them for the first time, including Montaigne, Pascal, Seneca, Savonarola, Wesley, and F. W. Newman. These journals also contain Kierkegaard’s thoughts on the decisions surrounding the publication of the "Anti-Climacus" writings: The Sickness unto Death and especially Practice in Christianity. Kierkegaard’s reader gets the sense both of a gathering storm—by the close of the last journal in this volume, the famous "attack on Christendom" is less than three years away—and a certain hesitancy: What needs reforming, Kierkegaard insists, is not "the doctrine" or "the Church," but "existences," i.e., lives.

S ren Kierkegaard

to the lilies in the field and to the birds of the air. With these inexpensive teachers, whom one pays neither with money nor with humiliation, no misunderstanding is possible, because they are silent—out of care for the worried person.

S  ren Kierkegaard

The first volume of sources and commentary devoted exclusively to Kierkegaard’s spirituality.