The Literary Witches Oracle

A 70-Card Deck and Guidebook

The Literary Witches Oracle

If you seek wisdom from strong, creative women, this oracle deck--which features 30 prominent female writers from literary history--will give you what you seek. The female visionaries in this deck will inform answers to questions about your creative life and spiritual journey. In addition to the portraits of literary heroes--like Virginia Woolf and Toni Morrison--and lesser-known trailblazers--like Yumiko Kurahashi and Mirabai--the deck features 40 symbol cards bearing illustrations of potent spiritual icons to enhance your reading. A small guidebook will act as an interpreter, helping you find meaning in the cards based on your specific intentions, the writers' dominant traits, and the spiritual symbols at play.

Poetic Remedies for Troubled Times

From Ask Baba Yaga

Poetic Remedies for Troubled Times

Baba Yaga offers more off-kilter remedies for the modern dilemmas of an unstable age using her uncanny style, poetic simplicity, and surprising candor. In this follow-up to Ask Baba Yaga: Otherworldly Advice for Everyday Troubles, award-winning writer Taisia Kitaiskaia once again embodies the legendary witch of Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga, to provide life advice to the questioning and the hurting. Answering real questions from readers, Baba Yaga provides responses in the form of short poems that are lyrical, surreal, sometimes funny, and always honest. During these difficult days, Poetic Remedies for Troubled Times provides literary self-help for readers who appreciate Baba Yaga's strange, surprising style and striking honesty.

The Magical Writing Grimoire

Use the Word as Your Wand for Magic, Manifestation & Ritual

The Magical Writing Grimoire

Part guided journaling practice, part interactive magical grimoire, The Magical Writing Grimoire shows you how to incorporate writing as a magical tool to create healing and amplify spell-casting. Whenever and wherever you are, word magic is with you. During times of chaos or pain, or simply when you need a cosmic boost, writing can help. In fact, healers, therapists, and magical practitioners have long incorporated writing in their practices. From letter writing for creating closure to dream diaries, writing is a powerful process for moving your dreams into manifestation. The Magical Writing Grimoire approaches writing as a self-actualizing, intentional, and healing act. You will learn how to combine writing with ritual and magic for self-discovery, clarifying intentions, creating and making things happen, and manifestation. You will also be guided in how to create a personal grimoire—a magical book of self rituals, spells, and intentions. Each chapter contains writing prompts that also incorporate magical ritual and tools including working with crystals, spell incantation, or candle alchemy. Other rituals and prompts may be set up for certain moon phases or ask you to bury or burn a piece of paper. Equal parts practical and inspiring, The Magical Writing Grimoire shows you how to wield your word as your wand.

The Nightgown & Other Poems

The Nightgown & Other Poems

"Ripe with mythic awareness and dark, fairytale-turned-feminist humor, renowned writer Taisia Kitaiskaia's debut poetry collection catalogs magical beasts, language, and the mysteries of our world with wide, witchy eyes. From the author of Literary Witches: A Celebration of Magical Women Writers and Ask Baba Yaga, The Nightgown is a mystic, hungry collection of poems, a roiling landscape wandered over by wild swerves of language, creatures of all sorts, and mysterious beings such as The Folklore, The Hurt Opera, The Eunuch, and the titular angry Nightgown. Haunted by the magic and transformations of Slavic and Western European fairy tales, the symbolism of the Tarot, the medieval world, feminism, and a mythology all its own, The Nightgown bears an immigrant's fascination with the alien syrup of the English language, preserving an ancient consciousness of human, beast, and earth. Funny and loud, the poems are strangely accessible in their animal awareness of mortality and urgency for contact with the unknown"--

The Literary Gazette

A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts

The Literary Gazette


The Literature History in Remote Antiquity Period and The Three Dynasties (Xia, Shang and Zhou Dynasty)

The Literature History in Remote Antiquity Period and The Three Dynasties (Xia, Shang and Zhou Dynasty)

The book is the volume of “The Literature History in Remote Antiquity Period and The Three Dynasties (Xia, Shang and Zhou Dynasty)” among a series of books of “Deep into China Histories”. The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC, from the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1046 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period The Shang ruled in the Yellow River valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River and Yangtze River. These Yellow River and Yangtze civilizations arose millennia before the Shang. With thousands of years of continuous history, China is one of the world's oldest civilizations, and is regarded as one of the cradles of civilization.The Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) supplanted the Shang and introduced the concept of the Mandate of Heaven to justify their rule. The central Zhou government began to weaken due to external and internal pressures in the 8th century BC, and the country eventually splintered into smaller states during the Spring and Autumn period. These states became independent and warred with one another in the following Warring States period. Much of traditional Chinese culture, literature and philosophy first developed during those troubled times.In 221 BC Qin Shi Huang conquered the various warring states and created for himself the title of Huangdi or "emperor" of the Qin, marking the beginning of imperial China. However, the oppressive government fell soon after his death, and was supplanted by the longer-lived Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). Successive dynasties developed bureaucratic systems that enabled the emperor to control vast territories directly. In the 21 centuries from 206 BC until AD 1912, routine administrative tasks were handled by a special elite of scholar-officials. Young men, well-versed in calligraphy, history, literature, and philosophy, were carefully selected through difficult government examinations. China's last dynasty was the Qing (1644–1912), which was replaced by the Republic of China in 1912, and in the mainland by the People's Republic of China in 1949.Chinese history has alternated between periods of political unity and peace, and periods of war and failed statehood – the most recent being the Chinese Civil War (1927–1949). China was occasionally dominated by steppe peoples, most of whom were eventually assimilated into the Han Chinese culture and population. Between eras of multiple kingdoms and warlordism, Chinese dynasties have ruled parts or all of China; in some eras control stretched as far as Xinjiang and Tibet, as at present. Traditional culture, and influences from other parts of Asia and the Western world (carried by waves of immigration, cultural assimilation, expansion, and foreign contact), form the basis of the modern culture of China.

Lucan's Bellum Civile

Between Epic Tradition and Aesthetic Innovation

Lucan's Bellum Civile

Lucan s Bellum Civile is one of the most impressive and unusual works of Silver Age Latin literature, and has been the subject of much research in recent years. In this volume well-known experts on Lucan examine the poetological, narratological and stylistic techniques the author employed to write on the theme of civil war. The epic poem is at once both conforms to and exceeds the tradition of the genre, and confronts its readers with a new kind of aesthetic."

Ask Baba Yaga

Otherworldly Advice for Everyday Troubles

Ask Baba Yaga

Dear Baba Yaga, I think I must crave male attention too much. I fear that, without it, I would feel invisible. BABA YAGA: When you seek others this way, you are invisible nonetheless. Yr shawl is covered in mirrors in which others admire themselves; this is why they greet you so passionately. It is good to be seen, but it is better to see. Find a being to look hard into, & you will see yrself and what is more than you. In age-old Slavic fairy tales, the witch Baba Yaga is sought out by those with a burning need for guidance. In contemporary life, Baba Yaga—a dangerous, slippery oracle—answered earnest questions on The Hairpin for years. These pages collect her most poignant, surreal, and humorous exchanges along with all-new questions and answers for those seeking her mystical advice.

The Literary Gazette

A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts

The Literary Gazette