The Lost Letters of Pergamum

This fascinating story of a Roman citizen's spiritual transformation gives a reliable glimpse into the world of the New Testament and the early church. The second edition has been updated with improved readability and narrative flow.

The Lost Letters of Pergamum

A Fascinating Glimpse into the World of the New Testament Transported two thousand years into the past, readers are introduced to Antipas, a Roman civic leader who has encountered the writings of the biblical author Luke. Luke's history sparks Antipas's interest, and they begin corresponding. While the account is fictional, the author is a highly respected New Testament scholar who weaves reliable historical information into a fascinating story, offering a fresh, engaging, and creative way to learn about the New Testament world. The first edition has been widely used in the classroom (over 30,000 copies sold). This updated edition, now with improved readability and narrative flow, will bring the social and political world of Jesus and his first followers to life for many more students of the Bible.

The Lost Letters of Pergamum

Using the literary technique of correspondence through ancient letters, which comprise much of the New Testament, Longenecker mixes fact and fiction to paint an interesting and informative picture of the New Testament world and early ...

The Lost Letters of Pergamum

Introduces readers to the style of New Testament writings, the social and political world of Jesus and his first followers, and early Christian gatherings. Using the literary technique of correspondence through ancient letters, which comprise much of the New Testament, Longenecker mixes fact and fiction to paint an interesting and informative picture of the New Testament world and early Christianity.

Thinking through Paul

This is exactly what Pauline experts Bruce W. Longenecker and Todd D. Still accomplish with their new textbook aimed at college and seminary level courses on Paul and his writings.

Thinking through Paul

The study of Paul and his letters can be exciting, challenging, and life-changing, but only if it is done well and only if students achieve more than a basic familiarity with the subject. This is exactly what Pauline experts Bruce W. Longenecker and Todd D. Still accomplish with their new textbook aimed at college and seminary level courses on Paul and his writings. Longenecker and Still bring decades of study and expertise to Thinking through Paul, challenging readers to delve deeply into Paul’s writings and wrestle with his richly-layered and dynamic theological discourse. Seeking to situate their study of the Apostle in proper perspective, Longenecker and Still first look at Paul’s life before and after his encounter with the risen Christ en route to Damascus, then examine each of Paul’s letters individually, and finally synthesize the Pauline writings to highlight the main strands of Paul’s theologizing—all the while keeping in mind the particular context of first-century Christianity. Filled with images, maps, charts, and questions for further study and discussion, Thinking through Paul is both engaging and easy-to-follow, making it the perfect choice for classrooms and for interested readers.

In Stone and Story

Longenecker is careful both to introduce the reader to everything needed to grasp such connections and also to note where they are absent. Simply as an introduction to everyday life in the Roman empire, this book is of great value.

In Stone and Story

This beautifully designed, full-color textbook introduces the Roman background of the New Testament by immersing students in the life and culture of the thriving first-century towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, which act as showpieces of the world into which the early Christian movement was spreading. Bruce Longenecker, a leading scholar of the ancient world of the New Testament, discusses first-century artifacts in relation to the life stories of people from the Roman world. The book includes discussion questions, maps, and 175 color photographs. Additional resources are available through Textbook eSources.

The Cross before Constantine

Upending a longstanding consensus, Bruce W. Longenecker presents a wide variety of material artifacts to illustrate that Christians made use of the cross as a visual symbol of their faith long before Constantine appropriated it to ...

The Cross before Constantine

Upending a longstanding consensus, Bruce W. Longenecker presents a wide variety of material artifacts to illustrate that Christians made use of the cross as a visual symbol of their faith long before Constantine appropriated it to consolidate his power in the fourth century. Constantine did not invent the cross as a symbol of Christian faith; for an impressive number of Christians before Constantine’s reign, the cross served as a visual symbol of commitment to a living deity in a dangerous world.

Thinking Through Paul Video Lectures

Thinking through Paul Video Lectures features 13 lessons, introducing students to Paul's life, letters, and theology.

Thinking Through Paul Video Lectures

Thinking through Paul Video Lectures---a companion to the textbook Thinking through Paul by Bruce W. Longenecker and Todd D. Still---includes 13 lessons, each corresponding to a chapter in the textbook. The lectures provide a college and seminary level introduction to the life of the apostle Paul and the New Testament books he authored.

Fakes Forgeries and Fictions

The Lost Letters of Pergamum is a fictional correspondence between a character named antipas (of rev 2:13 fame) and the author of the gospel of Luke. in terms of genre, a collection such as this is not wholly unlike the Epistles of Paul ...

Fakes  Forgeries  and Fictions

Fakes, Forgeries, and Fictions examines the possible motivations behind the production of apocryphal Christian texts. Did the authors of Christian apocrypha intend to deceive others about the true origins of their writings? Did they do so in a way that is distinctly different from New Testament scriptural writings? What would phrases like "intended to deceive" or "true origins" even mean in various historical and cultural contexts? The papers in this volume, presented in September 2015 at York University in Toronto, discuss texts from as early as second-century papyrus fragments to modern apocrypha such as tales of Jesus in India in the nineteenth-century Life of Saint Issa. The highlights of the collection include a keynote address by Bart Ehrman ("Apocryphal Forgeries: The Logic of Literary Deceit") and a panel discussion on the Gospel of Jesus' Wife, reflecting on what reactions to this particular text--primarily on biblioblogs--can tell us about the creation, transmission, and reception of apocryphal Christian literature. The eye-opening papers presented at the panel caution and enlighten readers about the ethics of studying unprovenanced texts, the challenges facing female scholars both in the academy and online, and the shifting dynamics between online and traditional print scholarship.

Early Christianity in Pompeian Light

The contributors to this book (including Carolyn Osiek, David Balch, Peter Oakes, Bruce Longenecker, and others) demonstrate that it is an exciting time to explore the interface between the Vesuvian contexts and the early Jesus-movement.

Early Christianity in Pompeian Light

Scholars of early Christianity are awakening to the potential of Pompeii’s treasures for casting light on the settings and situations that were commonplace and conventional for the first urban Christians. The uncovered world of Pompeii, destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E., allows us to peer back in time, capturing a heightened sense of what life was like on the ground in the first century – the very time when the early Jesus-movement was beginning to find its feet. In light of the Vesuvian material remains, historians are beginning to ask fresh questions of early Christian texts and perceive new contours, nuances, and subtleties within the situations those texts address. The essays of this book explore different dimensions of Pompeii’s potential to refine our lenses for interpreting the texts and situations of early Christianity. The contributors to this book (including Carolyn Osiek, David Balch, Peter Oakes, Bruce Longenecker, and others) demonstrate that it is an exciting time to explore the interface between the Vesuvian contexts and the early Jesus-movement.

Seven Deadly Spirits

The Message of Revelation's Letters for Today's Church T. Scott Daniels. prototype of a corrupt teacher who led believers into fatal compromise with the daughters of Moab. Apparently at Pergamum, some within the church were teaching ...

Seven Deadly Spirits

T. Scott Daniels, pastor of a Los Angeles megachurch, contends that corporate bodies like churches form an individual spiritual personality of sorts. Cultural influences can impact the collective spirit or attitude of a congregation, either hindering it from becoming all God intends it to be or setting it free to glorify God. In this practical work, Daniels examines the nature of the seven representative "angels" of the churches addressed in Revelation to show how congregations can escape the principalities and powers that hold them captive. The book encourages working pastors, church leaders, and ministry students to consider a systems approach to church leadership--one that takes seriously the powers at work within local congregations--and offers suggestions for transformation.

The Crosses of Pompeii

Now, Bruce W. Longenecker reviews that evidence, in comparison with other possible evidence of first-century Christian presence elsewhere, and reaches the conclusion that there were indeed Christians living in the doomed town.

The Crosses of Pompeii

Through a twist of fate, the eruption that destroyed Pompeii in 79 CE also preserved a wealth of evidence about the town, buried for centuries in volcanic ash. Since the town’s excavations in the eighteenth century, archaeologists have disputed the evidence that might attest the presence of Christians in Pompeii before the eruption. Now, Bruce W. Longenecker reviews that evidence, in comparison with other possible evidence of first-century Christian presence elsewhere, and reaches the conclusion that there were indeed Christians living in the doomed town. Illustrated with maps, charts, photographs, and line drawings depicting artifacts from the town, The Crosses of Pompeii presents an elegant case for their presence. Longenecker’s arguments require dramatic changes to our understanding of the early history of Christianity.

Revelation Teach the Text Commentary Series

For more background on these false teachers, see Hemer, Letters, 87–94. ... moving and accurate account of what it might have been like for Antipas, see the novel by New Testament scholar Bruce Longenecker, The Lost Letters of Pergamum.

Revelation  Teach the Text Commentary Series

The Teach the Text Commentary Series utilizes the best of biblical scholarship to provide the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively. The carefully selected preaching units and focused commentary allow pastors to quickly grasp the big idea and key themes of each passage of Scripture. Each unit of the commentary includes the big idea and key themes of the passage and sections dedicated to understanding, teaching, and illustrating the text.

The Cambridge Companion to St Paul

Timothy , Titus ( 1984 ) , Paul's Gospel and Mission : The Outlook from his Letter to the Romans ( 1985 ) , Christ and His ... and The Lost Letters of Pergamum : A Story from the New Testament World ( with Ben Witherington , 2003 ) .

The Cambridge Companion to St Paul

Assessment of the apostle Paul and a fresh appreciation of his continuing significance today.

Revelation

Recipients John identifies the recipients as seven churches in Western Asia Minor: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea ... 22Dramatized nicely by Longenecker's fictional The Lost Letters of Pergamum.

Revelation

This three-part study covers the history of interpretation, theological foundations, and exegesis. Copious illustrations from the author's worldwide travels enhance discussion of Rome's emperors, empire, and ideology as the premier horizon for understanding John's immediate context and meaning. Distinctive contributions include Stevens's effort to re-canonize Revelation by insisting on gospel concord, methodically interpreting all of Revelation through the lens of the seven churches and showing how Revelation's imagery consistently relates more to the incarnation than the Parousia. Stevens bypasses traditional millennial options to argue that Revelation is "passion-millennial"--the passion of Jesus predicates the passion of the church. Under Stevens's hands, Revelation becomes eminently sensible to the original audience and powerfully pertinent for today's church.

Anthropology and New Testament Theology

Antipas Antipas (2:13) appears to refer to an individual known to both John and the assembly at Pergamum by an actual, ... exploration of the life of Antipas, see Bruce W. Longenecker, The Lost Letters of Pergamum: A Story from the ...

Anthropology and New Testament Theology

This volume considers the New Testament in the light of anthropological study, in particular the current trend towards theological anthropology. The book begins with three essays that survey the context in which the New Testament was written, covering the Old Testament, early Jewish writings and the literature of the Greco –Roman world. Chapters then explore the anthropological ideas found in the texts of the New Testament and in the thought of it writers, notably that of Paul. The volume concludes with pieces from Brian S. Roser and Ephraim Radner who bring the whole exploration together by reflecting on the theological implications of the New Testament's anthropological ideas. Taken together, the chapters in this volume address the question that humans have been asking since at least the earliest days of recorded history: what does it mean to be human? The presence of this question in modern theology, and its current prevalence in popular culture, makes this volume both a timely and relevant interdisciplinary addition to the scholarly conversation around the New Testament.

Narrative Dynamics in Paul

Bruce W. Longenecker is Lecturer in New Testament Studies at the University of St. Andrews , Scotland . He is the author of The Triumph of Abraham's God , 2 Esdras , Eschatology and the Covenant , and The Lost Letters of Pergamum .

Narrative Dynamics in Paul

Are Paul's letters undergirded and informed by key narratives, and does a heightened awareness of those narratives help us to gain a richer and more rounded understanding of Paul's theology? The last two decades of the twentieth century witnessed an increasing interest in the narrative features of Paul's thought. A variety of studies since that period have advanced "story" as an integral and generative ingredient in Paul's theological formulations. In this book, a team of leading Pauline scholars assesses the strengths and weaknesses of a narrative approach, looking in detail at its application to particular Pauline texts.

Teaching Religion Using Technology in Higher Education

... while his Yours Faithfully: Virtual Letters from the Bible and Bruce Longenecker's The Lost Letters of Pergamum consist of imaginative letters from biblical or parabiblical characters.24 These works convey scholarship to their ...

Teaching Religion Using Technology in Higher Education

This edited collection helps those teaching religion in higher education utilize technology to increase student learning both inside and outside of the classroom. Recent times have seen major technological shifts that have important implications for how religion is taught at a post-secondary level. Providing multiple perspectives on a range of topics—including social media use and interactive classroom learning —this book presents a series of original case studies and insights on how technology can be used in religion classes in higher education to improve student learning.

Phoebe

Longenecker, Bruce W., The Lost Letters of Pergamum: A Story from the New Testament World (Baker Academic, 2016). Martin, Dale B., Slavery as Salvation: The Metaphor of Slavery in Pauline Christianity (Yale University Press, 1990).

Phoebe

Around 56 AD, the apostle Paul wrote to the church in Rome. He entrusted this letter to Phoebe, whom he describes as the deacon of the church at Cenchreae and a patron of many. But who was this remarkable woman? Biblical scholar and popular author and speaker Paula Gooder imagines Phoebe's story—who she was, the life she lived, and her first-century faith—and in doing so opens up Paul's world.

The Heart of Revelation

One is the book by Bruce Longenecker entitled The Lost Letters of Pergamum.1 His story is set in the first century and features a character who also appears in Revelation: Antipas. As the story goes, Antipas, a Roman civic leader, ...

The Heart of Revelation

"Let anyone who has ears to hear listen to what the Spirit says to the churches." The book of Revelation speaks powerfully to every aspect of the Christian life, and the modern church desperately needs the vision of hope that it provides. In this thematic approach to the Bible's final book, author J. Scott Duvall identifies ten major themes, including: God and his people, worship, enemies, the mission, and the new creation. In The Heart of Revelation, readers will understand how to read Revelation in context, asking, "What are the main truths and realities of Revelation that we can know for certain?" and learning how these truths are relevant to our lives as modern-day believers.

Apostle of the Crucified Lord

Longenecker, Bruce W. The Lost Letters of Pergamum: A Story from the New Testament World. 2nd ed. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2016. Imaginative but credible collection of fictional correspondence. McKnight, Scot, and Joseph B. Modica, ...

Apostle of the Crucified Lord

This comprehensive, widely used text by Michael Gorman presents a theologically focused, historically grounded interpretation of the apostle Paul and raises significant questions for engaging Paul today. After providing substantial background information on Paul's world, career, letters, gospel, spirituality, and theology, Gorman covers in full detail each of the thirteen Pauline epistles. Enhancing the text are questions for reflection and discussion at the end of each chapter as well as numerous photos, maps, and tables throughout. The new introduction in this second edition helpfully situates the book within current approaches to Paul. Gorman also brings the conversation up-to-date with major recent developments in Pauline studies and devotes greater attention to themes of participation, transformation, resurrection, justice, and peace. --Publisher's description.

The Living Church

... distance learning programmes - M.Litt in Bible and the Contemporary World Professor Jeremy Begbie Author of Theology , Music & Time The Holy Spirit Today ' Dr Bruce Longenecker Author of The Lost Letters of Pergamum Fictionalizing ...

The Living Church