Herbal Remedies of the Lumbee Indians

However, in ¡835, the North Carolina Constitution was amended to disenfranchise or strip the Cherokee, ancestors of the Lumbee, other Indian groups, and freed African Americans of their citizenship rights such as testifying in court, ...

Herbal Remedies of the Lumbee Indians

"There's nothing happens to a person that can't be cured if you get what it takes to do it. We come out of the earth, and there's something in the earth to cure everything ... I don't fix a tonic until I'm sure what's wrong with a person. I don't make guesses. I have to be sure, because medicine can do bad as well as good, and I don't want to hurt anybody.... Maybe it takes some herbs. Maybe it takes some touching. But most of all, it takes faith"--Vernon Cooper, Lumbee healer. The Lumbee Indian tribe has lived in the coastal plain of North Carolina for centuries, and most Lumbee continue to live in rural areas of Robeson County with access to a number of healing plants and herbs used in the form of teas, poultices, and salves to treat common ailments. The first section of this book describes and documents the numerous plant and herbal remedies that the Lumbee have used for centuries and continue to use today. There are remedies for ailments relating to cancer (external and internal), the circulatory and digestive systems, the heart, hypertension and hypotension, infections and parasitic diseases, asthma, pregnancy, sprains, swellings, and muscle, skeletal and joint disorders, to name just a few. The second portion of this work records the words, recollections and wellness philosophies of living Lumbee elders, healers, and community leaders. The information presented in this book is not intended to be a substitute for the advice or treatment from a physician. The authors do not advocate self-diagnosis or self-medication, and warn that any plant substance may cause an allergic or extremely unhealthy reaction in some people.

The Lumbee Indians

termination- oriented committee suspicious of federal expenditures on Indian programs.17 Yet the Bureau of Indian ... granting the Indians of Robeson County a form of official, yet limited, federal acknowledgment.20 Lumbee attorney ...

The Lumbee Indians

Jamestown, the Lost Colony of Roanoke, and Plymouth Rock are central to America's mythic origin stories. Then, we are told, the main characters--the "friendly" Native Americans who met the settlers--disappeared. But the history of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina demands that we tell a different story. As the largest tribe east of the Mississippi and one of the largest in the country, the Lumbees have survived in their original homelands, maintaining a distinct identity as Indians in a biracial South. In this passionately written, sweeping work of history, Malinda Maynor Lowery narrates the Lumbees' extraordinary story as never before. The Lumbees' journey as a people sheds new light on America's defining moments, from the first encounters with Europeans to the present day. How and why did the Lumbees both fight to establish the United States and resist the encroachments of its government? How have they not just survived, but thrived, through Civil War, Jim Crow, the civil rights movement, and the war on drugs, to ultimately establish their own constitutional government in the twenty-first century? Their fight for full federal acknowledgment continues to this day, while the Lumbee people's struggle for justice and self-determination continues to transform our view of the American experience. Readers of this book will never see Native American history the same way.

Provide for the Recognition of the Lumbee Tribe of Cheraw Indians of North Carolina

Per Lumbee Indians Fict Senator Kerr Scott reports this Thurs , week that the Lumbee Indians May 3 1456 » Southeastern North Carollas should soon have their name made official as far as the Fed eral Government is concerned . , aj May 21 ...

Provide for the Recognition of the Lumbee Tribe of Cheraw Indians of North Carolina


Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South

1; Alexandra Harmon, Indians in the Making: Ethnic Relations and Indian Identities around Puget Sound (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), 138–39; Blu, The Lumbee Problem, 36, 79. 8. House Committee on Indian Affairs, ...

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South

With more than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River. Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation. They did so against the backdrop of some of the central issues in American history, including race, class, politics, and citizenship. Lowery argues that "Indian" is a dynamic identity that, for outsiders, sometimes hinged on the presence of "Indian blood" (for federal New Deal policy makers) and sometimes on the absence of "black blood" (for southern white segregationists). Lumbee people themselves have constructed their identity in layers that tie together kin and place, race and class, tribe and nation; however, Indians have not always agreed on how to weave this fabric into a whole. Using photographs, letters, genealogy, federal and state records, and first-person family history, Lowery narrates this compelling conversation between insiders and outsiders, demonstrating how the Lumbee People challenged the boundaries of Indian, southern, and American identities.

H R 898 to Provide for Recognition of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina

Because of the 1956 Act , we acknowledge that legislation is necessary if Lumbee Indians are to be afforded the ... it may only recognize Lumbee Indians as a tribe pursuant to its Commerce Clause authority if a court could decide that ...

H R  898  to Provide for Recognition of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina


Legends of The Lumbee and some that will be

More recently, Lumbee storytellers such as Barbara Braveboy Locklear, Barbara Locklear, Mardella Lowry, and Nora Dial-Stanley, carry on this ancient storytelling tradition to a much broader audience.

Legends of The Lumbee  and some that will be

The 55,000 members of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina reside primarily in Robeson, Hoke, Cumberland, and Scotland counties. The Lumbee Tribe is the largest tribe in North Carolina. They take their name from the Lumbee River which winds its way through Robeson County. The ancestors of the Lumbee were mainly Cheraw and related Siouan-speaking Indians. One of the favorite activities of the many Lumbee families was sharing stories around the fire at night. More recently, Lumbee storytellers such as Barbara Braveboy Locklear, Barbara Locklear, Mardella Lowry, and Nora Dial-Stanley, carry on this ancient storytelling tradition to a much broader audience. The ancestors of the Lumbee tribe shared many stories with other local tribes such as the Cherokee, Creek, and Catawba. As the Lumbee people shared stories, they found that their sister tribes also told tales about "little wild spirit people", animals, the afterlife, and how our world came to be.

Southeastern Indians Since the Removal Era

Vernon Ray Thompson, "A History of the Education of the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina, from 1885 to 1970" (Ed.D. dissertation, University of Miami, 1973), pp. 44-48; Dial and Eliades, The Only Land I Know, pp. 91-98.

Southeastern Indians Since the Removal Era

The authors of these essays are an interdisciplinary team of anthropologists and historians who have combined the research methods of both fields to present a comprehensive study of their subject. Published in 1979, the book takes an ethnohistorical approach and touches on the history, anthropology, and sociology of the South as well as on Native American studies. While much has been written on the archaeology, ethnography, and early history of southern Indians before 1840, most scholarly attention has shifted to Oklahoma and western Indians after that date. In studies of the New South or of Indian adaptation after the passage of the frontier, southeastern native peoples are rarely mentioned. This collection fills that void by providing an overview history of the culture and ethnic relations of the various Indian groups that managed to escape the 1830s removal and retain their ethnic identity to the present.

The Lumbee Indians

26 March 1953 . Allows other Indian , or White , students to attend if approved by the Board of Trustees . 1359. 1953 North Carolina Session Laws ch . 874 , “ An Act Relating to the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina . " 20 April 1953 .

The Lumbee Indians

Includes "Index to The Carolina Indian Voice" for January 18, 1973-February 4, 1993 (p. 189-248).

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South

Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted a With more than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the ...

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South

With more than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River. Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted a

Law and Society in the South

See also Dial and Eliades, “Lumbee Indians of North Carolina and Pembroke State University,” 27–41; and George Lewis, “Not So Well Red: Native Americans in the Southern Civil Rights Movement Reconsidered,” Borderlines: Studies in ...

Law and Society in the South

Law and Society in the South reconstructs eight pivotal legal disputes heard in North Carolina courts between the 1830s and the 1970s and examines some of the most controversial issues of southern history, including white supremacy and race relations, the teaching of evolution in public schools, and Prohibition. Finally, the book explores the various ways in which law and society interacted in the South during the civil rights era. The voices of racial minorities-some urging integration, others opposing it-grew more audible within the legal system during this time. Law and Society in the South divulges the true nature of the courts: as the unpredictable venues of intense battles between southerners as they endured dramatic changes in their governing values.

The Lumbee Problem

The book offers insights into the workings of racial ideology and practice in both the past and the present South?and particularly into the nature of Indianness as it is widely experienced among nonreservation Southeastern Indians.

The Lumbee Problem

How does a group of people who have American Indian ancestry but no records of treaties, reservations, Native language, or peculiarly "Indian" customs come to be accepted?socially and legally?as Indians? Originally published in 1980, The Lumbee Problem traces the political and legal history of the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina, arguing that Lumbee political activities have been powerfully affected by the interplay between their own and others' conceptions of who they are. The book offers insights into the workings of racial ideology and practice in both the past and the present South?and particularly into the nature of Indianness as it is widely experienced among nonreservation Southeastern Indians. Race and ethnicity, as concepts and as elements guiding action, are seen to be at the heart of the matter. By exploring these issues and their implications as they are worked out in the United States, Blu brings much-needed clarity to the question of how such concepts are?or should be?applied across real and perceived cultural borders.

American Indian and African American People Communities and Interactions

We People " : Understanding Lumbee Indian Identity in a Tri - Racial Situation . " Ph.D. diss . , University of Chicago , 1972 . Recounts the Lumbee Indian's long attempts to gain recognition as Indians , at both the state and federal ...

American Indian and African American People  Communities  and Interactions

Provides detailed annotations to the historical and cultural interactions between African Americans and American Indians in the United States and Canada.

Congressional Record

This Organization of the United Nations . for certain items . Referred to the Committee bill would assure that Lumbee Indians sincerely hope that action can be taken on Finance . be treated as other Indian groups ...

Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

Oversight Hearings on the Implementation of Indian Education Amendments

I indicated to him I was very interested in working with him and the Lumbee Indians to help provide the services that the Federal Government has for various Indian people . We welcome you here today . Mr. JONES .

Oversight Hearings on the Implementation of Indian Education Amendments


Bibliography of Native American Bibliographies

Lumbee Indians 620. Feehan, Paul G. A Bibliography of Representative Materials on the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina. Washington, DC: Educational Resources Information Center, 1978. ERIC: ED1S3660.

Bibliography of Native American Bibliographies

Lists all significant bibliographies for researchers, librarians, and students seeking information on tribes or topics in Native American studies.

The Only Land I Know

This is the standard history of the Lumbee Indian people of southwestern North Carolina, the largest Indian community in population east of the Mississippi. Dial and Eliades trace the history of this group through 1974.

The Only Land I Know

This is the standard history of the Lumbee Indian people of southwestern North Carolina, the largest Indian community in population east of the Mississippi. Dial and Eliades trace the history of this group through 1974. Among the subjects covered are the Lumbee during the colonial period and the revolutionary War; the Lowrie war; the infamous Lowrie Band of the Civil War; the development of the Lumbee educational system; Lumbee folklore; and the modern Lumbee

Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States

( 3 ) By adding at the end the following new clauses : " Whereas the Lumbee Indians of Robeson and adjoining counties in North Carolina are descendants of coastal North Carolina Indian tribes , principally Cheraw , and have remained a ...

Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States

Some vols. include supplemental journals of "such proceedings of the sessions, as, during the time they were depending, were ordered to be kept secret, and respecting which the injunction of secrecy was afterwards taken off by the order of the House".

Report on Terminated and Nonfederally Recognized Indians

Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission United States. ... Indeed , some departments or agencies of Government , along with the Lumbee Indians , have been accused of blatant violation of the provisions of the 1956 ...

Report on Terminated and Nonfederally Recognized Indians


Report on Terminated and Nonfederally Recognized Indians

Indeed , some departments or agencies of Government , along with the Lumbee Indians , have been accused of blatant violation of the provisions of the 1956 Lumbee Act , and investigations have been demanded . The Lumbee Indians have ...

Report on Terminated and Nonfederally Recognized Indians


Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission

Indeed , some departments or agencies of Government , along with the Lumbee Indians , have been accused of blatant violation of the provisions of the 1956 Lumbee Act , and investigations have been demanded . The Lumbee Indians have ...

Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission