The Marlinspike Sailor

This classic is organized as follows: Making Rope Behave Knot, Bend or Hitch?

The Marlinspike Sailor

This classic is organized as follows: Making Rope Behave Knot, Bend or Hitch? Anyone Can Splice The Short Splice The Long Splice The Stowage of Rope How to Lay Up a Grommet Whippings The Heaving Line Some Notes on Seizing Worming, Parceling and Serving The Running Turk’s Head The Star Knot The Tack Knot The Lanyard Knot Matthew Walker’s Knot A Simple Rope Mat Ladder Mat and Block Mat A Russian or Walled Mat A Sword Mat A Rope Ladder with a New Twist Plaited Sennits Crown Sennits Rope Handles Coach whipping Grafting, Pointing and Hitching Cockscombing The Sea Chest Deadeyes and Lanyards Decorative Wall Bag Tom Crosby’s Ditty Sox The Rigger’s Little Helper Wooden Bilge Pumps Palm and Needle Practice The Ditty-Bag The Sea Bag The Bell Rope Wooden Cleats Rope Fenders Stropped Blocks Canvas Deck Bucket Rigging a Jackline Sail Stop Bag Some Notes on the Use of “Taykles” A Lanyard for a Cannon The Catboat Race Making a Mast Boot The Water Jug Registration Numbers Art and Yacht Design Synthetic Fibers and Their Characteristics

The Marlinspike Sailor

For a rope mat, a rope ladder, a sea chest, a ditty bag, a canvas bucket, a mast boot, and the best-looking rope fenders or heaving line in the marina, this is the book of choice.

The Marlinspike Sailor

Hervey Garrett Smith was the foremost marine illustrator of the 1950s and 1960s, and his wonderful drawings of traditional ropework quickly propelled The Marlinspike Sailor to cult classic status when it was published in 1956. With the addition of a section on modern, synthetic rope in the 1970s, its popularity has continued undiminished to this day. It teaches a few basic knots--the bowline, sheet bend, and rolling hitch, among others--and splices in three-strand and braided rope. But its real business is decorative rope and canvaswork--the traditional arts of the sailor--and here it has no equal. For a rope mat, a rope ladder, a sea chest, a ditty bag, a canvas bucket, a mast boot, and the best-looking rope fenders or heaving line in the marina, this is the book of choice.

Marlinspike Sailor s Arts and Crafts

Helps you learn how to make all manner of cool, sailorly items: hammocks, block mats, companion way or stair treads, sailor's bracelets, hammock bags for carrying fruits, and more, tool covers, stanchion or porch railing covers, decorated ...

Marlinspike Sailor s Arts and Crafts

Helps you learn how to make all manner of cool, sailorly items: hammocks, block mats, companion way or stair treads, sailor's bracelets, hammock bags for carrying fruits, and more, tool covers, stanchion or porch railing covers, decorated grommets for hanging towels, water bottle or wine carafe covers.

The Arts of the Sailor

The perfect shipboard reference, this volume is packed with useful "hands-on" information: sailor's tools, basic knots, and useful hitches; handsewing and canvas work; dozens of other topics. Over 100 illustrations.

The Arts of the Sailor

The perfect shipboard reference, this volume is packed with useful "hands-on" information: sailor's tools, basic knots, and useful hitches; handsewing and canvas work; dozens of other topics. Over 100 illustrations.

Boating

... THE MARLINSPIKE SAILOR by Heroey Garrett Smith; revised third edition
published by John de Graff, Inc., 34 Oak Ave., ... Hervey Garrett Smith, author of
Arts of the Sailor, Boat Carpentry, How to Choose a Sailboat, Racing Sailor's
Bible, ...

Boating


The Working Guide to Traditional Small Boat Sails

The more practice, the more familiar the skill will become—and there will always
be uses for those short pieces of line with an eye splice. There are any number of
books written on the subject of marlinspike skills, but The Marlinspike Sailor by ...

The Working Guide to Traditional Small Boat Sails

Make your modern sailboat look (and work) like a salty classic. The Golden Age of Sail is long past, sadly, and much of its lore is nearly extinct. Sailboats now almost uniformly use the Bermudan sloop rig—a triangular jib and a triangular mainsail. But that rig evolved mainly to meet esoteric yacht-racing measurement rules. It is not necessarily the most efficient or effective rig. This book lets sailors rediscover the practical advantages—and the aesthetic delights—of such configurations as the sprit sail, the gaff sail, the lug sail, and the gunter rig. It also includes valuable information on marlinspike work like rope-whipping and eye-splicing; and tips on converting your modern sailboat to a traditional rig. ______________________ Some reviews: “This will become the classic book on traditional rigs for small boats. . . . A concise and thorough compendium on using low-cost and efficient traditional rigs, the kind that not only look better but work better on small boats than their modern counterparts.” —Gary Blankenship, Duckworks Magazine “The ‘traditional’ rigs here are the kind you’ll find on the clinker plywood designs of Iain Oughtred and the like; rigs with polyester sails and running rigging. Tufnol blocks and stainless steel shackles. ‘Modern traditional boats’, if you’ll forgive the phrase. Similarly, there’s a nice mix of old and new the manner the material is presented: old in the cleanliness of the page design; new in the extensive use of colour close-up photographs to illustrate details of the rigs. Highly recommended.” —Water Craft Magazine "Mr. Nichols does an excellent job of explaining the fundamentals in terms that are useful to old salts looking to tweak their rigs, builders trying to figure out what's next, and admirers of traditional design." —Good Old Boat

Marlinspike

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Marlinspike

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Marlinspike (sometimes marlin spike, marlinespike, or the archaic marlingspike/marling-spike) is a tool used in ropework for tasks such as unlaying rope for splicing, untying knots, forming a toggle (for releasing ropes joined under tension such as with a belaying pin splice), or forming a makeshift handle. A marlinspike is a polished cone tapered to a rounded or flattened point, usually 6 to 12 inches long, although sometimes 26 inches or longer, depending on what ply and size of rope they are intended for. The marlinspike is a tool made from metal, usually iron or steel, differentiating it from the fid which is similar in shape and function but made from wood or bone. The marlinspike may be a separate tool or one item on a pocket knife. Sailors who become quite proficient at knot tying, sewing, and use of the marlinspike can be known as marlin spikes, or marlin spike seamen. The body of knowledge that includes knotting and splicing is called marlinespike seamanship.

The Shipcarver s Handbook

If this interests you , obtain a copy of one of Hervey Garrett Smith's books , such
as The Arts of the Sailor or The Marlinspike Sailor . Smith's drawings of
decorative rope coverings look real , and they are a good 79 . Fanciful friezes of
squid and ...

The Shipcarver s Handbook

Details the steps involved in executing fine wood carvings for boats or the home, from selection of tools and woods to designs and finishes

Why Knot

Boston: Sail Books, Inc., 1976. (Nice drawings.) Smith, Hervey Garrett. The
Marlinspike Sailor. Clinton Corners, NY: John de Graff, Inc., 1981. (Best drawings
of knots.) Thurman, John. Progressive Pioneering. London: C. Arthur Pearson,
Ltd., ...

Why Knot

“Mr. Petit is the perfect teacher” in this fascinating, educational volume on knot-tying—an art and science that has held civilization together (The Wall Street Journal). Philippe Petit is known for his astounding feat of daring when, on August 7, 1974, he stepped out on a wire illegally rigged between the World Trade Center’s twin towers in New York City. But beyond his balance, courage, and showmanship, there was one thing Petit had to be absolutely certain of—his knots. Without the confidence that his knots would hold, he never would have left the ground. In fact, while most of us don’t think about them beyond tying our shoelaces, the humble knot is crucial in countless contexts, from sailing to sports to industrial safety to art, agriculture, and more. In this truly unique book, Petit offers a guide to tying over sixty of his essential knots, with practical sketches illustrating his methods and clear tying instructions. Filled with photos in which special knots were used during spectacular high-wire walks, quirky knot trivia, personal anecdotes, helpful tips, magic tricks, and special tying challenges, Why Knot? will entertain and educate readers of all ages. “In reading Philippe’s book we are cogently reminded that without the ability to secure a rope, or tether a goat, or make fast the sheets of a galley, much of the civilization that we take for granted would disappear as easily as a slipknot in the hands of a Vegas conjuror.” —Sting, musician and activist “His descriptions are clear, he deploys humor frequently and he makes his points with anecdotes that are colorful and memorable. Explaining the purpose and creation of knots and thanks to those flawless drawings Mr. Petit earns perfect marks.” —The Wall Street Journal

The Sailor s Magazine

... uncomplainWe can remember 40 years ago , { ing than the cabin passengers ,
through seeing a common sailor leap from ... and { abaft the mainmast ; they
expected to acknowledging his authority and handle the marlin spike , and take
their ...

The Sailor s Magazine


The Sailor s Magazine and Naval Journal

... can remember 40 years ago , ing than the cabin passengers , through seeing a
common sailor leap from ą . the whole ... and fod and abaft the mainmast ; they
expected to handle the marlin spike , and take their acknowledging his authority ...

The Sailor s Magazine  and Naval Journal


Captain Nathaniel Brown Palmer

They were well able to “hand, reef and steer,” but they knew nothing of the nice
work of the “marlinspike sailor,” because they never had opportunity to learn it.
Such work was done on the long voyages only. When these foreigners came for
the ...

Captain Nathaniel Brown Palmer


The Sailors Magazine and Seamen s Friend

There is a force and a direct - when he is under the influence of ness in the
character of the sailor the Divine Grace does he lose that ... He learns to act
promptly marlin - spike with any less vigor in emergencies , to put forth effort or
neatness ?

The Sailors  Magazine and Seamen s Friend


The Secret Directory

list as a sailor , and Garibaldi eleven years his senior . Then he remembered him
... Of course he could splice , knot , reef and steer ; yes , he said to himself , the
man was a good marlinspike sailor , and nothing more . How much he must have
 ...

The Secret Directory


Notes on Navigation

Our second - mate Bessie , was the skipper of the “ Edith , " and was a good
boatman , but he had had little experience as a marlinspike sailor , so that on
assuming the command , as I did , it could not be said that we were strong
handed .

Notes on Navigation


Navy Departments

But this opposition of the sailor may be easily overcome by judicious treatment ,
emulation , and a system of ... No valid reason is apparent why the naval brigade
should interfere with great guns or the marlinspike , if we stop what is known in ...

Navy Departments


Proceedings of the United States Naval Institute

But this opposition of the sailor may be easily overcome by judicious treatment ,
emulation , and a system of ... No valid reason is apparent why the naval brigade
should interfere with great guns or the marlinspike , if we stop what is known in ...

Proceedings of the United States Naval Institute


Sailing Boats from Around the World

'D'ye mind me, a sailor should be every inch, All as one as a piece of the ship,
And with her brave the world, without ... in the use of the marlinspike and the art
of making long and short splices in a rope, turning in a dead-eye, stropping a
block, ...

Sailing Boats from Around the World

Comprehensive, profusely illustrated book documents early-20th-century sailing: boat types around the world, racing boats, odd and experimental vessels, more. Over 380 illustrations and photographs. Indexes. Bibliography.

The Complete Sailor Second Edition

This is not just an instructional book---it's an insight into a sailor's approach to the sea, boats, and the ever-changing dynamic of wind on the water "A learn-to-sail book with heart.

The Complete Sailor  Second Edition

This is not just an instructional book---it's an insight into a sailor's approach to the sea, boats, and the ever-changing dynamic of wind on the water "A learn-to-sail book with heart."--WoodenBoat "A real winner...a masterful blend of straightforward text with delightful and instructive illustrations. Quite simply a great primer on sailing and the world of boats for readers of all ages."--Cruising World "Teaches sailing with flair and poetry."--SAIL "A great walk-through for the novice, both entertaining and thorough."--Sailing "Sits in a class by itself. Elegantly simple, encyclopedic in scope, and a delightful reference for any novice—with lots to offer intermediate sailors, too."--Kalamazoo Gazette If you never sailed, sailed once, or have sailed for a lifetime, this book is perfect for beginners but deep enough content for those interested in going beyond basics. Revised and expanded to include racing and GPS navigation, The Complete Sailor is not just a how-to sail book, but a book that teaches you how to become a sailor. Inside you’ll find: An all-in-one, comprehensive introduction to sailing Up-to-date information on techniques and approaches offered by the changing nature of the sport Exquisite pen-and-ink illustrations Topics include: Wind Sense; Working Winds; Getting Underway; The Boat; Rigging; Sails; Under Power; Rules of the Road; Anchoring; Ropework; Marlinspike Seamanship; Emergencies; Sea and Sky; Navigation; Racing; Trailering