The Meaning of Evolution

The book may be read with equal profit and pleasure by the general reader, the student, and the expert.-Ashley Montagu, Isis This book is, without question, the best general work on the meaning of evolution to appear in our time.

The Meaning of Evolution

A world-famous scientist presents a synthesis of modern views on the principles of evolution. The result of twenty-five years of research, The Meaning of Evolution follows the rise and fall of the dynasties of life through the 2,000,000,000 years of the history of earth. It explains what forces have been acting to bring about evolution and re-examines human aims, values, and duties in the light of what science discloses of the nature of man and of his place in the history of life. The clearest and soundest exposition of the nature of the evolutionary process that has yet been written...The book may be read with equal profit and pleasure by the general reader, the student, and the expert.-Ashley Montagu, Isis This book is, without question, the best general work on the meaning of evolution to appear in our time.-The New York Times

The meaning of evolution

The meaning of evolution


The Meaning of Evolution

These stories are handed down from generation to generation and are scarcely questioned in the thought of most men. In early Greece there was a succession of men whom the world calls philosophers.

The Meaning of Evolution


The Meaning of Evolution

The Meaning of Evolution


The Meaning of Evolution

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

The Meaning of Evolution

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Origins of Meaning

This is a work of broad scope and significance." W. Tecumesh Fitch, Lecturer in Psychology, University of St. Andrews, from the bookjacket. "I won't lose you now!" said Cam in a voice ragged with emotion.

The Origins of Meaning

"In this engagingly written and broadly interdisciplinary book, Jim Hurford integrates findings from ethology and neuroscience with concepts from philosophy and linguistics to make an explicit and convincing case that animals have rich concepts, and thus that meaning predated language. This is a work of broad scope and significance." W. Tecumesh Fitch, Lecturer in Psychology, University of St. Andrews,from the bookjacket.

The Meaning of Evolution

I had assumed my efforts would be perfunctory, since historians of science had previously established two distinct and nonoverlapping meanings for "evolution." In the seventeenth century the word had been recruited to refer to the ...

The Meaning of Evolution

Did Darwin see evolution as progressive, directed toward producing ever more advanced forms of life? Most contemporary scholars say no. In this challenge to prevailing views, Robert J. Richards says yes—and argues that current perspectives on Darwin and his theory are both ideologically motivated and scientifically unsound. This provocative new reading of Darwin goes directly to the origins of evolutionary theory. Unlike most contemporary biologists or historians and philosophers of science, Richards holds that Darwin did concern himself with the idea of progress, or telos, as he constructed his theory. Richards maintains that Darwin drew on the traditional embryological meanings of the terms "evolution" and "descent with modification." In the 1600s and 1700s, "evolution" referred to the embryological theory of preformation, the idea that the embryo exists as a miniature adult of its own species that simply grows, or evolves, during gestation. By the early 1800s, however, the idea of preformation had become the concept of evolutionary recapitulation, the idea that during its development an embryo passes through a series of stages, each the adult form of an ancestor species. Richards demonstrates that, for Darwin, embryological recapitulation provided a graphic model of how species evolve. If an embryo could be seen as successively taking the structures and forms of its ancestral species, then one could see the evolution of life itself as a succession of species, each transformed from its ancestor. Richards works with the Origin and other published and archival material to show that these embryological models were much on Darwin's mind as he considered the evidence for descent with modification. Why do so many modern researchers find these embryological roots of Darwin's theory so problematic? Richards argues that the current tendency to see evolution as a process that is not progressive and not teleological imposes perspectives on Darwin that incorrectly deny the clearly progressive heart of his embryological models and his evolutionary theory.

Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Genetics and Organic Evolution

This Encyclopaedic Dictionary Has Been Essentially A Compilation And Editing Of The Terms And Concepts Taken From Genetics And Organic Evolution.

Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Genetics and Organic Evolution

This Encyclopaedic Dictionary Has Been Essentially A Compilation And Editing Of The Terms And Concepts Taken From Genetics And Organic Evolution. Many Words Borrowed Form More General Usage Has Been Endowed With Very Special Meaning, Sometimes Not Obvious To The Uninitiated.The Entries Have Been Represented In A Clear And Explanatory Style To Provide Both Straight Forward Definitions And Invaluable Background Information. This Approach Combined With An Extensive Cross Referencing System Enables The Reader To Place Each Entry Into A Broader Scientific Context. Many Diagrams Have Been Incorporated Whenever The Meaning Of A Term Can Be Best Conveyed By Means Of A Diagram.Every Effort Has Been Made To Include Certain Entries Which Take Into Account Of Recent Developments And Trends In Genetics And Organic Evolution.The Terms Included In This Encyclopaedic Dictionary Have Been Presented In Brief Analytical Phrases Thereby Avoiding The More Comprehensive Type Of Treatment Appropriate To Large Reference Works. The Extent Of Each Entry Has Been Determined By The Need For Definition Of Meaning, Function And Agricultural Relevance. Also, Certain Entries Have Been Added To Take Into Account Of Recent Developments And Trends In Agriculture.The Encyclopaedic Dictionary Will Be Of Immense Value To The Students Of Genetics And Organic Evolution, Botany, Ecology, Biology, Microbiology, Anthropology, Biochemistry, Archaeology, Geography, Geology, Agriculture And Environmental Science.

The Meaning of Science

In The Meaning of Science, Tim Lewens offers a provocative introduction to the philosophy of science, showing us for example what physics teaches us about reality, what biology teaches us about human nature, and what cognitive science ...

The Meaning of Science

What is science? Is it uniquely equipped to deliver universal truths? Or is it one of many disciplines - art, literature, religion - that offer different forms of understanding? In The Meaning of Science, Tim Lewens offers a provocative introduction to the philosophy of science, showing us for example what physics teaches us about reality, what biology teaches us about human nature, and what cognitive science teaches us about human freedom. Drawing on the insights of towering figures like Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn, Lewens shows how key questions in science matter, often in personal, practical and political ways.

The White Hole in Time

Explores the patterns of evolution, the nature of time, and humanity's quest for inner peace to speculate on the future of humanity's development and the potential for rapid inner evolution and transformation

The White Hole in Time

Explores the patterns of evolution, the nature of time, and humanity's quest for inner peace to speculate on the future of humanity's development and the potential for rapid inner evolution and transformation

Darwin s Dangerous Idea

Offers a wider perspective on Darwin's scientific theory of natural selection, explaining how it extends beyond biology, analyzing current controversies over the origins of life and inherent biases, and challenging popular philosophies. 35 ...

Darwin s Dangerous Idea

Offers a wider perspective on Darwin's scientific theory of natural selection, explaining how it extends beyond biology, analyzing current controversies over the origins of life and inherent biases, and challenging popular philosophies. 35,000 first printing. Tour.

The Evolution of Grammar

The Evolution of Grammar has important implications for the development of language and for the study of cognitive processes in general.

The Evolution of Grammar

Joan Bybee and her colleagues present a new theory of the evolution of grammar that links structure and meaning in a way that directly challenges most contemporary versions of generative grammar. This study focuses on the use and meaning of grammatical markers of tense, aspect, and modality and identifies a universal set of grammatical categories. The authors demonstrate that the semantic content of these categories evolves gradually and that this process of evolution is strikingly similar across unrelated languages. Through a survey of seventy-six languages in twenty-five different phyla, the authors show that the same paths of change occur universally and that movement along these paths is in one direction only. This analysis reveals that lexical substance evolves into grammatical substance through various mechanisms of change, such as metaphorical extension and the conventionalization of implicature. Grammaticization is always accompanied by an increase in frequency of the grammatical marker, providing clear evidence that language use is a major factor in the evolution of synchronic language states. The Evolution of Grammar has important implications for the development of language and for the study of cognitive processes in general.

A Meaning to Life

In A Meaning to Life, Michael Ruse argues that this is a false turn, and there is no real progress in the evolutionary process.

A Meaning to Life

Does human life have any meaning? Does the question even make sense today? For centuries, the question of the meaning or purpose of human life was assumed by scholars and theologians to have a religious answer: life has meaning because humans were made in the image of a good god. In the 19th century, however, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution changed everything-and the human organism was seen to be more machine than spirit. Ever since, with the rise of science and decline of religious belief, there has been growing interest - and growing doubt - about whether human life really does have meaning. If it does, where might we find it? The historian and philosopher of science Michael Ruse investigates this question, and wonders whether we can find a new meaning to life within Darwinian views of human nature. If God no longer exists-or if God no longer cares-rather than promoting a bleak nihilism, many Darwinians think we can convert Darwin into a form of secular humanism. Ruse explains that, in a tradition going back to the time of Darwin himself, and represented today by the evolutionist E. O. Wilson, evolution is seen as progress -- "from monad to man" - and that positive meaning is found in continuing and supporting this upwards path of life. In A Meaning to Life, Michael Ruse argues that this is a false turn, and there is no real progress in the evolutionary process. Rather, meaning in the Darwinian age can be found if we turn to a kind of Darwinian existentialism, seeing our evolved human nature as the source of all meaning, both in the intellectual and social worlds. Ruse argues that it is only by accepting our true nature - evolved over millennia - that humankind can truly find what is meaningful.

Kielmeyer and the Organic World

Evolution: The Extended Synthesis. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010. Plato. Timaeus. Translated by R.G. Bury. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1975. [Pölitz, K. H. L.] Die Philosophie unseres Zeitalters in der Kinderkappe; ...

Kielmeyer and the Organic World

Carl Friedrich Kielmeyer (1765-1844) was the 'father of philosophy of nature' owing to his profound influence on German Idealist and Romantic Naturphilosophie. With the recent growth of interest in Idealist and Romantic philosophy of nature in the UK and abroad, the importance of Kielmeyer's work is being increasingly recognised and special attention is being paid to his influence on biology's development as a distinct discipline at the end of the eighteenth century. In this exciting new book, Lydia Azadpour and Daniel Whistler present the first ever English translations of key texts by Kielmeyer, along with contextual and interpretative essays by leading international scholars, who are experts on the philosophy of nature and the formation of the life sciences in the late eighteenth century. The topics they cover include: the laws of nature, the concept of force, the meaning of 'organism', the logic of recapitulation, Kielmeyer and ecology, sexual differentiation in animal life and Kielmeyer's relationship to Kant, Schelling and Hegel. In doing so, they provide a comprehensive English reference to Kielmeyer's historical and contemporary significance.

The Literary Animal

The goal of this book is to overcome some of the widespread misunderstandings about the meaning of a Darwinian approach to the human mind generally, and literature specifically.

The Literary Animal

The goal of this book is to overcome some of the widespread misunderstandings about the meaning of a Darwinian approach to the human mind generally, and literature specifically.