The Meaning Revolution

The Power of Transcendent Leadership

The Meaning Revolution

Advisor of Leadership at Google and former vice president of leadership at LinkedIn claims that the biggest driver of motivation is the chance to serve a larger purpose beyond our careers and ourselves, rather than salary, benefits, bonuses, or other material incentives; companies that are able to successfully focus their people, their teams, and their culture around meaning outperform their competition. Fred Kofman's approach to leadership has little to do with the standard practices taught in business school and traditional books. Bringing together economics and business theory, communications and conflict resolution, family counseling and mindfulness mediation, Kofman argues in The Meaning Revolution that our most deep-seated, unspoken, and universal anxiety stems from our fear that our life is being wasted--that the end of life will overtake us when our song is still unsung. Material incentives--salary and benefits--account for perhaps 15 percent of employees' motivation at work. The other 85 percent is driven by a need to belong, a feeling that what we do day in and day out makes a difference, that how we spend our time on earth serves a larger purpose beyond just ourselves. Kofman claims that transcendental leaders, wherever they are in the hierarchy, are able to put aside their self-interests and help others to feel connected with others on a team or in an organization on a great mission and part of an ennobling purpose. He argues that every organization involved in work that is nonviolent and non addictive has what he calls an "immortality project" at its core. And the challenge for leaders is to identify and expand on that core, to inspire all stakeholders to take part.

The Meaning Revolution

The Meaning Revolution

'One of the most extraordinary thinkers on leadership and management I have ever encountered'- Sheryl Sandberg Forget the standard practices of leadership taught in business school -- all about compensation, command and control. This is a new model for how to inspire -- through purpose, principle and people. The Meaning Revolutionis Fred Kofman's call to arms for anyone who has ever felt unengaged at work and offers actionable advice for how we can all find more meaning and dignity whatever we do. Bringing together economics and conflict resolution, counselling and mindfulness, Kofman explains how our most deep-seated anxiety is that we are wasting our lives. The things that we think matter -- salaries and job titles -- actually only account for 15% of our motivation at work. The other 85% is about how we belong, feeling we make a difference, that we serve a purpose larger than ourselves. Transformative leadership is about helping employees feel connected to a great mission or purpose, and discovering the 'immortality project' at the core of your business.

Change the World Without Taking Power: The Meaning of Revolution Today

Change the World Without Taking Power: The Meaning of Revolution Today

This new edition of John Holloway's contemporary classic, Change the World Without Taking Power, includes an extensive new preface by the author. The wave of political demonstrations since the Battle of Seattle in 2001 have crystallised a new trend in left-wing politics. Modern protest movements are grounding their actions in both Marxism and Anarchism, fighting for radical social change in terms that have nothing to do with the taking of state power. This is in clear opposition to the traditional Marxist theory of revolution which centres on the overthrow of government. In this book, John Holloway asks how we can reformulate our understanding of revolution as the struggle against power, not for power. After a century of failed attempts by revolutionary and reformist movements to bring about radical social change, the concept of revolution itself is in crisis.

The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution

Statecraft and the Prospect of Armageddon

The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution

Looks at how nuclear weapons have affected the meaning of war, the psychology of statesmanship, and the formulation of military policy

Yale Law Journal: Symposium - The Meaning of the Civil Rights Revolution (Volume 123, Number 8 - June 2014)

Yale Law Journal: Symposium - The Meaning of the Civil Rights Revolution (Volume 123, Number 8 - June 2014)

"Symposium: The Meaning of the Civil Rights Revolution" is, in effect, a new and extensive book of contemporary thought on civil rights by many of today's leading writers on the Constitution. In February 2014, the Yale Law Journal held a symposium at Yale Law School marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the simultaneous publication of Bruce Ackerman’s We the People: The Civil Rights Revolution (2014). Contributors' essays reflected on the origins or status of the American civil rights project, using Ackerman’s book as a focal point or a foil. Those essays are collected as the June 2014 issue, the final issue of the academic year. The contents are: • We the People: Each and Every One — Randy E. Barnett • Reactionary Rhetoric and Liberal Legal Academia — Justin Driver • Popular Sovereignty and the United States Constitution: Tensions in the Ackermanian Program — Sanford Levinson • The Neo-Hamiltonian Temptation — David A. Strauss • The Civil Rights Canon: Above and Below — Tomiko Brown-Nagin • Changing the Wind: Notes Toward a Demosprudence of Law and Social Movements — Lani Guinier & Gerald Torres • Protecting Civil Rights in the Shadows — David A. Super • Universalism and Civil Rights (with Notes on Voting Rights After Shelby) — Samuel R. Bagenstos • Separate Spheres — Cary Franklin • Ackerman's Civil Rights Revolution and Modern American Racial Politics — Rogers M. Smith • Rethinking Rights After the Second Reconstruction — Richard Thompson Ford • A Revolution at War with Itself? Preserving Employment Preferences from Weber to Ricci — Sophia Z. Lee • Have We Moved Beyond the Civil Rights Revolution? — John D. Skrentny • Equal Protection in the Key of Respect — Deborah Hellman • Ackerman’s Brown — Randall L. Kennedy • The Anti-Humiliation Principle and Same-Sex Marriage — Kenji Yoshino • De-Schooling Constitutional Law — Bruce Ackerman The issue, the eighth and final one of Volume 123, also includes a cumulative Index to the entire volume's titles and authors. As with previous digital editions of Yale Law Journal available from Quid Pro Books, features include active Tables of Contents (including links in each Essay's own table), linked footnotes and URLs, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting.

Revolution and World Politics

The Rise and Fall of the Sixth Great Power

Revolution and World Politics

The relation of revolutions to international relations is central to modern history. Revolutions have, as much as war or nationalism, shaped the development of world politics. Equally, revolutions have been, in cause, ideology and consequence, international events. By putting the international politics of revolution centre stage, Fred Halliday's book makes a major contribution to the understanding of both revolution and world politics.

Routledge Handbook of Arabic Second Language Acquisition

Routledge Handbook of Arabic Second Language Acquisition

The Routledge Handbook of Arabic Second Language Acquisition introduces major current approaches in Arabic second language acquisition (SLA) research and offers empirical findings on crucial aspects and issues to do with the learning of Arabic as a foreign language and Arabic SLA. It brings together leading academics in the field to synthesize existing research and develops a new framework for analyzing important topics within Arabic SLA. This handbook will be suitable as a reference work for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students and scholars actively researching in this area and is primarily relevant to sister disciplines within teacher training and Arabic applied linguistics. The themes and findings should, however, also be attractive to other areas of study, including theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognition, and cognitive psychology.

The Day the Revolution Began

Rethinking the meaning of Jesus' crucifixion

The Day the Revolution Began

In The Day the Revolution Began Tom Wright invites you to consider the full meaning of the event at the heart of the Christian faith – Jesus’ crucifixion. As he did in his acclaimed Surprised by Hope, Wright once again challenges commonly held beliefs, this time arguing that the Protestant Reformation did not go far enough in reshaping our understanding of the Cross. With his characteristic rigour and incisiveness, he goes back to the New Testament to show that Jesus’ death not only releases us from the guilt and power of sin, but is nothing less than the beginning of a world-wide revolution that continues to this day – a revolution that creates and energizes a movement responsible for restoring and reconciling the whole of God’s creation. The Day the Revolution Began will take you to a new level in your appreciation of the meaning of Jesus’ sacrifice: opening up its powerful and amazing implications, inspiring you with a renewed sense of purpose and hope, and reminding you of the crucial role you can play in the world-transforming movement that Jesus started.

State Energy Transition

German and American Realities and Chinese Choices

State Energy Transition

This book places a current topic—energy transition—within the historical background of human social development and explores the value and significance of energy transition for economic transition in the course of economic growth. It sheds light on the basic logic and the distinguishing characteristics of energy transition by reviewing the history of energy transition development in order to provide a new perspective for understanding and analyzing China's energy transition considering lessons from the German and American energy transition experiences. This book will be of interest to environmentalists, economists, and journalists.