The Metacognitive Student

The Metacognitive Student: How to Teach Academic, Social, and Emotional Intelligence in Every Content Area explains how teachers can learn and use with students a metacognitive approach the authors call structured SELf-questioning.

The Metacognitive Student

Dive deep into the what and how of structured SELf-questioning--a powerful strategy you can use to support students academically, socially, and emotionally. This resource contains vital metacognitive strategies and skills that educators can immediately use in their classroom. Use this resource to help effective education thrive in your classroom: Grasp the severity of the stress and anxiety teachers and students face in schools and how metacognitive SELf-questioning can reduce both. Learn to implement effective SELf-questioning into instruction to foster social-emotional learning (SEL). Review scenarios that depict use of the SELf-questioning strategy in every content area and grade level. Gain insight into how advanced SELf-questioning can achieve transfer of learning in the classroom to any academic or social context. Autonomously customize and create your own SELf-question sets and apply them to any situation within or outside of school. Contents: Introduction Chapter 1: Metacognition and SELf-Questioning--The Underpinnings of the Strategy Chapter 2: Structured SELf-Questioning for Academic Problem Solving in Mathematics Chapter 3: Structured SELf-Questioning for Social Problem Solving Chapter 4: Structured SELf-Questioning in Reading Comprehension Chapter 5: Structured SELf-Questioning in Reading Decoding Chapter 6: Structured SELf-Questioning for Inquiry-Based Research Writing Chapter 7: Structured SELf-Questioning for Emotional Recognition Chapter 8: Structured SELf-Questioning for Emotional Regulation and Problem Solving Chapter 9: Transfer Theory and SELf-Questioning Chapter 10: Structured SELf-Questioning for Social Studies Chapter 11: Structured SELf-Questioning and Metacognitive Components in Science Chapter 12: Autonomous Use of SELf-Questioning and Metacognition Epilogue

The Metacognitive Student

The Metacognitive Student: How to Teach Academic, Social, and Emotional Intelligence in Every Content Area explains how teachers can learn and use with students a metacognitive approach the authors call structured SELf-questioning.

The Metacognitive Student

"Stress and anxiety run rampant through modern schools, with both teachers and students dealing with seemingly unmanageable volumes of both daily. A common solution many school districts have tried is to introduce social-emotional learning (SEL) as part of school curricula, which has proven to help with stress and anxiety levels. However, SEL is challenging for teachers to implement effectively, often adding more stress to overwhelmed students and teachers than it takes away. Teachers need a way to practice and teach SEL simultaneously with academic content in order to achieve balance. To address this need, authors Richard K. Cohen, Deanne Kildare Opatosky, James Savage, Susan Olsen Stevens, and Edward P. Darrah developed a simple, flexible strategy teachers and students can utilize as part of any academic content area and any grade level. The Metacognitive Student: How to Teach Academic, Social, and Emotional Intelligence in Every Content Area explains how teachers can learn and use with students a metacognitive approach the authors call structured SELf-questioning. With this strategy, students and teachers learn how to stop and think about their thinking (metacognition) and weave critical-thinking and problem-solving skills into everyday learning to increase self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and responsible decision making. Through a metacognitive approach utilizing SELf-questioning, stress and anxiety lose their hold on classrooms so that effective education can thrive"--

Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning

This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can put into practice in their own classrooms -- explains how to lay the ground for this engagement, and help students become self-regulated learners actively employing ...

Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning

Research has identified the importance of helping students develop the ability to monitor their own comprehension and to make their thinking processes explicit, and indeed demonstrates that metacognitive teaching strategies greatly improve student engagement with course material. This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can put into practice in their own classrooms -- explains how to lay the ground for this engagement, and help students become self-regulated learners actively employing metacognitive and reflective strategies in their education. Key elements include embedding metacognitive instruction in the content matter; being explicit about the usefulness of metacognitive activities to provide the incentive for students to commit to the extra effort; as well as following through consistently. Recognizing that few teachers have a deep understanding of metacognition and how it functions, and still fewer have developed methods for integrating it into their curriculum, this book offers a hands-on, user-friendly guide for implementing metacognitive and reflective pedagogy in a range of disciplines. Offering seven practitioner examples from the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the social sciences and the humanities, along with sample syllabi, course materials, and student examples, this volume offers a range of strategies for incorporating these pedagogical approaches in college classrooms, as well as theoretical rationales for the strategies presented. By providing successful models from courses in a broad spectrum of disciplines, the editors and contributors reassure readers that they need not reinvent the wheel or fear the unknown, but can instead adapt tested interventions that aid learning and have been shown to improve both instructor and student satisfaction and engagement.

Teaching Students to Drive Their Brains

Educational researchers and professional developers Donna Wilson and Marcus Conyers have been exploring and using the explicit teaching of metacognition for years, and in this book they share a practical way to teach preK–12 students how ...

Teaching Students to Drive Their Brains

Research suggests that metacognition is key to higher student achievement, but studies of classroom practice indicate that few students are taught to use metacognition and the supporting cognitive strategies that make learning easier. You can teach metacognition to your students, so why wouldn’t you? This book shows you how. Metacognition is a tool that helps students unlock their brain’s amazing power and take control of their learning. Educational researchers and professional developers Donna Wilson and Marcus Conyers have been exploring and using the explicit teaching of metacognition for years, and in this book they share a practical way to teach preK–12 students how to drive their brains by promoting the following practices: * Adopt an optimistic outlook toward learning, * Set goals, * Focus their attention, * Monitor their progress, and * Engage in practices that enhance cognitive flexibility. Wilson and Conyers explain metacognition and how it equips students to meet today’s rigorous education standards. They present a unique blend of useful metaphors, learning strategies, and instructional tips you can use to teach your students to be the boss of their brains. Sample lessons show these ideas in a variety of classroom settings, and sections on professional practice help you incorporate these tools (and share them with colleagues and parents) so that you are teaching for and with metacognition.

Improving Student Information Search

The first half of the book explores the role of metacognition in problem-solving, especially for education graduate students. It also discusses the use of metacognitive scaffolds for improving students’ problem-solving.

Improving Student Information Search

Metacognition is a set of active mental processes that allows users to monitor, regulate, and direct their personal cognitive strategies. Improving Student Information Search traces the impact of a tutorial on education graduate students’ problem-solving in online research databases. The tutorial centres on idea tactics developed by Bates that represent metacognitive strategies designed to improve information search outcomes. The first half of the book explores the role of metacognition in problem-solving, especially for education graduate students. It also discusses the use of metacognitive scaffolds for improving students’ problem-solving. The second half of the book presents the mixed method study, including the development of the tutorial, its impact on seven graduate students’ search behaviour and outcomes, and suggestions for adapting the tutorial for other users. Provides metacognitive strategies to improve students’ information search outcomes Incorporates tips to enhance database search skills in digital libraries Includes seminal studies on information behaviour

Teacher Perceptions of Student Metacognition in Project based Learning Contexts Before and After Professional Development

This qualitative study investigated how six secondary school teachers facilitated learning and perceived metacognition in a Project-based Learning (PBL) instructional environment after participating in professional development (PD) on ...

Teacher Perceptions of Student Metacognition in Project based Learning Contexts Before and After Professional Development

This qualitative study investigated how six secondary school teachers facilitated learning and perceived metacognition in a Project-based Learning (PBL) instructional environment after participating in professional development (PD) on metacognitive strategies. Using symbolic interactionism as the philosophical overview, and following the Seidman interviewing technique, each participant was interviewed three times at different stages of the Guskey model of teacher change: before the metacognitive PD, after the metacognitive PD, and after implementing a PBL curriculum with metacognitive strategies. The participants included teachers who had previously completed trainings on the Food and Nutritional Sciences (FNS) PBL curriculum. Four questions guided this study: (a) how does knowledge of metacognitive strategies influence teacher perception of the learning process in a PBL instructional environment; (b) how do teachers facilitate student learning in a PBL instructional environment before and after metacognitive professional development; (c) what are educators' interpretations of student metacognitive regulation and knowledge during a PBL instructional environment; and (d) how do teachers view their roles in influencing student metacognition? Findings are presented, including before participating in the metacognitive PD teacher-participants described the learning process as emphasizing the need for engagement, relevancy, and discovery. Additionally, their discussions often focused on the teacher as accountable for students' learning. When discussing PBL and the learning process, teacher-participants indicated PBL engages students, fosters accountability both though internal and external forces, promotes learning other than just rote memorization, and offers the opportunity to help struggling students. Teacher-participant interviews after the metacognitive PD suggest teacher-participants were eager to implement new metacognitive facilitation strategies developed during the metacognitive PD. However, several factors precluded some teacher-participants from fully implementing the PBL curriculum and metacognitive strategies, including decreasing self-efficacy toward facilitating metacognition, confounding conceptualizations of metacognition and PBL, and time constraints. A key finding from post-PD interviews is metacognition seemed to be a complex PD topic that challenged teacher-participant paradigms toward teaching and learning, suggesting further PD and reinforcement might be warranted as teachers grapple with how metacognition meshes with their previous learning paradigms. Additionally, at the conclusion of the study teacher-participants still perceived value in facilitating metacognition within their students, and a desire for further training in metacognitive facilitation. Implications for practice are also presented, including the possible need for a more cyclical model for PD focusing on complex topics. A revised model for PD on complex topics is proposed, offering PD participants opportunities to implement new practices, and then further refine conceptualizations, before potentially adjusting their beliefs about teaching and learning. Further, implications for practice include increasing PD focused on metacognition, as well as incorporating metacognition into preservice teacher education programs. Lastly, suggestions for future research include examining the structure of metacognitive PD, exploring the most effective PD methods for metacognition, and inquiries into metacognition instruction in preservice teacher education.

Developing Metacognitive Teaching Strategies Through Lesson Study

The book illustrates how Lesson Study can be applied to craft metacognitive teaching strategies to enhance students’ learning to learn competencies.

Developing Metacognitive Teaching Strategies Through Lesson Study

The book illustrates how Lesson Study can be applied to craft metacognitive teaching strategies to enhance students’ learning to learn competencies. Based on the findings of an empirical study of a university-funded teaching development project, this book reports how to apply Lesson Study and Learning Study to enhance teachers’ metacognitive teaching competencies with a view to tackling the impacts and challenges created by and underlying the learning to learn curriculum. The book allows readers to experience metacognitive learning by sorting the prior knowledge on the metacognition, setting the goal and planning reading schedule, checking their understanding and progress, evaluating what they have or have not learned and reflected on their reading experience and feelings. Readers can grasp the key concept underpinning metacognitive teaching, including teaching strategies for developing students’ metacognitive abilities that include working on problem-solving activities, working on small collaborative groups, making metacognitive and learning strategies explicit, and encouraging students to reflect upon and talk about their learning.

Self talk for Teachers and Students

This enlightening guide teaches teachers to use metacognition to change the ways they think and learn so they will become more reflective, autonomous, proactive, and positive.

Self talk for Teachers and Students

This enlightening guide teaches teachers to use metacognition to change the ways they think and learn so they will become more reflective, autonomous, proactive, and positive. Many authentic teacher examples are sprinkled throughout the book, and the authors discuss the benefits of this process and the ways it will benefit the students. The sequence of chapters from teachers' personal use of metacognition to professional use of metacognition to classroom strategies show the connection between personal, professional, and classroom use. Unedited classroom examples provided by practicing teachers show the reliability and validity of these field-tested strategies. K-12 Classroom Teachers. A Longwood Professional Book.

Metacognition and Constructivist Approach

This research study tries to study the relation between the metacognitive skills and constructivist approach.

Metacognition and Constructivist Approach

This research study tries to study the relation between the metacognitive skills and constructivist approach. Does Constructivist approach and particularly constructivist 5 'E' Model can develop in student-teachers the metacognitive skills, that is metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive regulation. The study was conducted using mixed-method approach. The finding of the study suggest that constructivist 5 'E' model can develop metacognitive skills and different skills are observed during the different phase of 5 'E' model. Findings of the study suggest that teachers need to utilize the constructivist approach in teaching science to develop metacognitive skills among the students. If students are provided constructivist experiences in the classroom they definitely develop metacognitive skill which can help them to become the active self learners who can regulate their learning.

Metacognition

Empower your students to become mindful, reflective, and proficient thinkers and problem solvers. In Metacognition, authors Robin J. Fogarty and Brian M. Pete provide a practical framework to nurture these essential skills in every learner.

Metacognition

"In Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set for Empowering Students, Robin Fogarty and Brian Pete emphasize the critical but often overlooked practice of enhancing deep, reflective thinking among students in the classroom. They explain how metacognition, or students' awareness of what they know and don't know, is the first step in addressing deficit areas and an essential ability if students are to transfer learning to other areas throughout their lives. Fogarty and Pete provide teachers with a framework for nurturing this skill set in students and gently guiding students' metacognitive behaviors, organizing the book around three categorical labels for the strategies that can promote self-reflection in learners' work: (1) planning, (2) monitoring, and (3) evaluating"--

Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher Education

DISCUSSION This study found that having students complete metacognitive activities in class is not enough to aid in ... Metacognition is important because it can increase student learning, however, it requires significant support from ...

Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher Education

Metacognition plays an important role in numerous aspects of higher educational learning strategies. When properly integrated in the educational system, schools are better equipped to build more efficient and successful learning strategies for students in higher education. Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher Education is a detailed resource of scholarly perspectives that discusses current trends in learning assessments. Featuring extensive coverage on topics such as spiritual intelligence strategies, literacy development, and ubiquitous learning, this is an ideal reference source for academicians, graduate students, practitioners, and researchers who want to improve their learning strategies using metacognition studies.

Thinking about Thinking

Written for music educators in multiple content areas and grade levels, the book sets forth guidelines for promoting the use of metacognitive skills among music students.

Thinking about Thinking

Thinking about Thinking: Metacognition for Music Learning provides music educators with information, inspiration, and practical suggestions for teaching music. Written for music educators in multiple content areas and grade levels, the book sets forth guidelines for promoting the use of metacognitive skills among music students. Along with presenting an extensive overview of research on the topic, Dr. Benton shows how ideas gleaned from research can be put into daily practice in music classrooms and studios. General music teachers, directors of choral and instrumental ensembles, applied music teachers, future music educators, and music education collegiate faculty will find useful ideas and information here. In the current educational climate where all teachers are required to demonstrate that they encourage higher order thinking among their students, Thinking about Thinking: Metacognition for Music Learning gives music educators the tools they need to accomplish the task.

Metacognition Handbook

The Metacognition Handbook provides a clear, practical guide for teachers and school leaders to embed metacognition into classroom practice and school culture to enhance student outcomes.

Metacognition Handbook

Metacognition is one of the most highly effective but under-used teaching strategies in all of education. Over-complicated by some, over-simplified by others and misunderstood by many, this area of theory and practice is in need of a fresh look. The Metacognition Handbook provides a clear, practical guide for teachers and school leaders to embed metacognition into classroom practice and school culture to enhance student outcomes. Looking at classroom pedagogy, teacher CPD, transition, and more, The Metacognition Handbook argues a case for evidence informed application of simple but effective ways to boost student independence, self-regulation, self-efficacy and motivation.

International Handbook of Metacognition and Learning Technologies

For each technology covered, the Handbook: Explains how the technology fosters students' metacognitive or self-regulated learning. Identifies features designed to study or support metacognitve/SRL behaviors.

International Handbook of Metacognition and Learning Technologies

Education in today's technologically advanced environments makes complex cognitive demands on students pre-learning, during, and post-learning. Not surprisingly, these analytical learning processes--metacognitive processes--have become an important focus of study as new learning technologies are assessed for effectiveness in this area.Rich in theoretical models and empirical data, the International Handbook of Metacognition and Learning Technologies synthesizes current research on this critical topic. This interdisciplinary reference delves deeply into component processes of self-regulated learning (SRL), examining theories and models of metacognition, empirical issues in the study of SRL, and the expanding role of educational technologies in helping students learn. Innovations in multimedia, hypermedia, microworlds, and other platforms are detailed across the domains, so that readers in diverse fields can evaluate the theories, data collection methods, and conclusions. And for the frontline instructor, contributors offer proven strategies for using technologies to benefit students at all levels. For each technology covered, the Handbook: Explains how the technology fosters students' metacognitive or self-regulated learning.Identifies features designed to study or support metacognitve/SRL behaviors.Reviews how its specific theory or model addresses learners' metacognitive/SRL processes.Provides detailed findings on its effectiveness toward learning.Discusses its implications for the design of metacognitive tools.Examines any theoretical, instructional, or other challenges.These leading-edge perspectives make the International Handbook of Metacognition and Learning Technologies a resource of great interest to professionals and researchers in science and math education, classroom teachers, human resource researchers, and industrial and other instructors.

The Relationship between Male Dentistry Students Metacognitive Awareness and Listening Performance

Accordingly, the present study investigates the relationship between the Metacognitive awareness and listening performance of male Dentistry students in EGP course in Urmia University of Medical Sciences (UMSU).

The Relationship between Male Dentistry Students  Metacognitive Awareness and Listening Performance

Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2018 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Comparative Literature, grade: A, Urmia University (Uurmia University of Medical Sciences), course: TEFL, language: English, abstract: Metacognition defined as the knowledge and ability to monitor and control cognitive conditions in the learning process (Flavell, 1979). Listening is the most important skill of the four language skills in both learning and teaching, and plays an important role in our daily life. Although nowadays there is a deeper perception of listening, it needs more attention and research. Accordingly, the present study investigates the relationship between the Metacognitive awareness and listening performance of male Dentistry students in EGP course in Urmia University of Medical Sciences (UMSU). To do so, 50 Iranian male Dentistry students were participated in this study. They completed Metacognitive Awareness Listing Questionnaire (MALQ) and listening section of the final exam. First, the listening section of final exam was applied to the participants at classrooms by the teacher. Immediately after the administration of the examination, the MALQ were conducted. The analysis exposed a weak positive relationship between learners` Metacognitive awareness scores and listening performance. Although correlation was not high, still there is more correlation in problem solving, directed attention and planning evaluation than others.

The Metacognitive Functioning of Middle School Students with and Without Learning Disabilities During Mathematical Problem Solving

The purpose of this study was to investigate the metacognitive functioning of students with learning disabilities (LD), low-achieving (LA) students, and average-achieving (AA) students within the context of math problem solving.

The Metacognitive Functioning of Middle School Students with and Without Learning Disabilities During Mathematical Problem Solving

The purpose of this study was to investigate the metacognitive functioning of students with learning disabilities (LD), low-achieving (LA) students, and average-achieving (AA) students within the context of math problem solving. Metacognition, that is, the awareness individuals have regarding their own mental processes and ability to self-regulate performance, is an important predictor of learning. Deficits in metacognition have been attributed to an inability to effectively balance the cognitive and metacognitive strategies necessary for successful problem solving. Students with LD have considerable difficulty with self-regulation. This study investigates three components of metacognition: metacognitive knowledge, metacognitive experience, and metacognitive skills. The differences in these components among students with LD (n = 15), LA students (n = 38), and AA students (n = 29) and their influence on students2 math word problem solving was studied. Furthermore, the relationships among the three components of metacognition were investigated in the context of ability group differences. To assess metacognitive functioning, students were administered a structured interview and a survey and they solved three math word problems while thinking aloud. Additionally, to assess math problem-solving ability, students were administered a 10-item math word problem-solving test. Results indicated that students with LD demonstrated a different pattern of metacognitive function than AA students and LA students. Students across ability groups look relatively equivalent in the quantity of metacognitive skills. However, when discriminating between the type and quality of the metacognitive skills employed, ability group differences were evident. Ability group differences in metacognitive functioning emerged with respect to problem difficulty. The directions of the relationships among the components of metacognition were the same across ability groups. However, the magnitude and strength of the relationships differed by ability. Additionally, metacognitive knowledge was a significant predictor of math word problem-solving performance for AA students, but not for the other ability groups. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the relationship between metacognitive experience and math word problem solving for students with LD and AA students. Educational implications are discussed for teaching students to use metacognition during problem solving.

Metacognitive Mindscapes

The book will appeal to researchers and teachers interested in metacognition and metacognitive knowledge.

Metacognitive Mindscapes

Synthesizing research on metacognition and intersecting it with studies on second and foreign language writing, Sin Wang Chong puts forward a conceptual framework of metacognition and metacognitive knowledge that is employed as an analytical lens to examine junior secondary EFL students’ writing proficiencies. The exploration takes into account three facets of metacognitive knowledge, namely person knowledge, task knowledge, and strategic knowledge. Based on data garnered from interviews, open-ended questionnaires, and think-aloud sessions with students, the book analyzes the three types of metacognitive knowledge – theorized as a system – of junior secondary students with high, average, and low writing proficiencies. Discussion of the findings offers an expanded understanding of the factors that potentially affect students’ writing proficiencies, which will inform the teaching of primary and secondary EFL writing teachers to be more learner-centered. The book will appeal to researchers and teachers interested in metacognition and metacognitive knowledge.