The Motorcar in Ireland

Offers an overall historical assessment of the development of the motorcar within Ireland and its role as a modernising force impacting and influencing change on the island between the years 1896-1939.

The Motorcar in Ireland

Offers an overall historical assessment of the development of the motorcar within Ireland and its role as a modernising force impacting and influencing change on the island between the years 1896-1939.

Freewheeling through Ireland

I liked Mr Piehler and his oldfashioned style: 'The laziest and most carefree way
of getting about the country is to hire a car and the services of a chauffeur'; 'One
of the jolliest ways of touring in Ireland is by Motorcar and trailercaravan'.

Freewheeling through Ireland

At one moment you seem to be in the Lake District; then you could be on the moon; then you are in a wilderness; and then beside a Norwegian fjord.' When Edward decided to cycle around Ireland, he was enchanted by prehistoric fortresses, rugged landscapes, and landladies who insisted on washing his shirts. He takes you with him on a gentle ride up the west coast, eating enormous breakfasts and fresh fish for supper along the way, and stopping to chat to peat-cutters, fishermen, eccentric tourists and a famous matchmaker. With his trademark dry wit, observant eye and a sense of the absurd, he is the perfect companion for a tour of Ireland's most beautiful areas from the lakes of Killarney to the idyllic Joyce's Country, and from the dolmens of Clare to the deserts and neolithic remains of Mayo.

Wanderings in Ireland

The wheels will be large, built of wood and of the artillery type. Hard rubber or
some enduring substance will take the place of the present highpriced
unsatisfactory pneumatic tires. The car will be light, simple, strong, and easily
kept in repair.

Wanderings in Ireland

Are you minded for a jaunt through the island of Erin where tears and smiles are near related and sobs and laughter go hand in hand? We will walk, and will take it in donkey-cart and jaunting-carÑby train and in motor-carsÑand if you suit yourself you will suit me. Leaving Dublin we will circle northward, with a visit to Tanderagee Castle and the tomb of St. PatrickÑGod bless him,Ñthen on past the Causeway and down to Derry, and so into the County of Mayo, where in the midst of a fair you will encounter the wildest "Konfusion" and will be introduced to the gentleman who pays the rent. In the silence and solitudes of the island of Achill you will see tears and hear sobs as you listen to the keening for the dead. Near the island of Clare, Queen Grace O'Malley will almost order you away, as she did her husband, and your motor with all its wings out will roll through the grand scenery of the western coastÑnow down by the ocean and then far up amidst the sombre mountainsÑKylemore Castle and quaint Galway, Leap CastleÑghost-hauntedÑand moated Ffranckfort, Holy Cross and the Rock of CashelÑwill pass in stately array and be succeeded by a glimpse of army life at Buttevant, and a dinner at Doneraile Court, where you will hear of the only woman Free Mason. Killarney will follow with its music and legends, and Cork and Fermoy, and so on and into the County of Wexford, where you will rush through the lanes and byways and will scare many old ladiesÑdriving as many donkeysÑalmost into Kingdom Come. You will be welcomed at Bannow House and entertained in that quaintest of all earthly dwellings, "Tintern Abbey," which was a ruin when the family moved into it more than three centuries ago. You will visit the buried city of Bannow and pass on to where Moore watched the "Meeting of the Waters." You will visit in stately mansions, and go with a wild rush to the races at the Curragh. At Jigginstown House you will be reminded of the cowardice of a king, and as you bid farewell to Ireland you will lay a wreath on the grave of Daniel O'Connell,Ñall this and much more if you are so minded.Ê

The Victorian Visitor in Ireland

In Ireland , crowds stood in astonishment at the sight of the passing motorcars
while the drivers , appropriately attired in headgear and long heavy coats ,
battled their way through the dust and a road infrastructure designed for horse
power of a ...

The Victorian Visitor in Ireland


Advertising Literature and Print Culture in Ireland 1891 1922

... postcards and more.25 Take Figure 5.4,the symbolically richbadge ofthe
MotorCarCorps of the UlsterVolunteer Force. ... the Irish peoplereachinthe
present Home Rulecontest is indicated by thesigncarriedby the motorcar corps of
the Ulster ...

Advertising  Literature and Print Culture in Ireland  1891 1922

This is the first study of the cultural meanings of advertising in the Irish Revival period. John Strachan and Claire Nally shed new light on advanced nationalism in Ireland before and immediately after the Easter Rising of 1916, while also addressing how the wider politics of Ireland, from the Irish Parliamentary Party to anti-Home Rule unionism, resonated through contemporary advertising copy. The book examines the manner in which some of the key authors of the Revival, notably Oscar Wilde and W. B. Yeats, reacted to advertising and to the consumer culture around them. Illustrated with over 60 fascinating contemporary advertising images, this book addresses a diverse and intriguing range of Irish advertising: the pages of An Claidheamh Soluis under Patrick Pearse's editorship, the selling of the Ulster Volunteer Force, the advertising columns of The Lady of the House, the marketing of the sports of the Gaelic Athletic Association, the use of Irish Party politicians in First World War recruitment campaigns, the commemorative paraphernalia surrounding the centenary of the 1798 United Irishmen uprising, and the relationship of Murphy's stout with the British military, Sinn Féin and the Irish Free State.

Post Famine Ireland Social Structure

Ireland as It Really Was Desmond Keenan. Although the use of tar in road
construction was known in the 19th century, it was little used and was not
introduced on a large scale until the motorcar arrived on the scene in the early
20th century.

Post Famine Ireland  Social Structure

This book describes the social and economic conditions in Ireland in the second half of the 19th century, that is after the Great Famine. Though the famine severely affected the under-developed parts of Ireland, it did not greatly affect the Irish economy as a whole . On the contrary, an ever-increasing output was now spread over a falling population. GDP per capita went on rising, and people had more money to spread. The Government, the economy, agricultural and industrial, the churches, the educational system, medicine, the arts, the music, and the sports are described.

The Motor Car Journal

Dublio , ment among all sections of Irish motorcar owners . The Corporation , not
satisfied with resisting the advent of taxi . cabs , passed a resolution to ask the
Local Government Board of Ireland to fix the speed of motor vebicles in Dublin to
 ...

The Motor Car Journal


Environmental Argument and Cultural Difference

Cultural Diversity in Irish Transport Planning Introduction Radical changes in
physical mobility have accompanied the modernisation process in Ireland , now
one of the most car - dependent countries in the world ( McDonald and Nix , 2005
 ...

Environmental Argument and Cultural Difference

This text offers sociological evidence from three contrasting societies - Ireland, Germany and China - to explore how diversity of cultural context affects deliberation about the physical world. It disinters taken-for-granted practices, feelings and social relationships which affect environmental arguments.

The Irish Times

Indeed, on 13 November 1909 the Weekly Irish Times republished an article on '
The Sensation of Flight in the Air: A Lady's ... While the effects of the motor car on
the environment and on the cyclists of Dublin took some of the edge off the ...

The Irish Times

The Irish Times is a pillar of Irish society. Founded in 1859 as the paper of the Irish Protestant Middle Class, it now has a position in Irish political, social and cultural life which is incomparable. In fact this history of the Irish Times is also a history of the Irish people. Always independent in ownership and political view and never entwined in any way with the Roman Catholic Church, it has become the weather vane, the barometer of Irish life and society followed by people of all religious and political persuasions and none. The paper is politically liberal and progressive as well as being centre right on economic issues. This history is peopled by all the great figures of Irish history - Daniel O`Connell, W.B. Yeats, Garret FitzGerald, Conor Cruise O`Brien and the paper has numbered among its internationally renowned columnists Mary Holland, Fintan O'Toole, Nuala O'Faolain, John Waters and Kevin Myers . Its influence on Irish Society is beyond question. In his book, Terence Brown tells the story of the paper with narrative skill, wit and perception. Analysis of the stance of the Times during events ranging from The Easter Rising, The Civil War, the Troubles and the recent economic recession make the book essential reading for students of Irish history, be they the general reader, the academic or amateur historian. The book will be seen as crucial to our understanding of Irish history in the past century and a half.

The John Ireland Companion

Ireland. on. Record: The. Composer. and. the. Growth. of. the. Gramophone.
Robert. Matthew-Walker. I. n the broader ... to revolutionise communication, some
still in their infancy: the telegraph, telephone, radio, moving pictures, the motor-
car, ...

The John Ireland Companion

Published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of his death, this book presents new articles by leading authorities on John Ireland and his music, together with transcriptions of his broadcast talks and of interviews with the composer.

A New History of Ireland Volume VII

Irish tourism had a major ethnic element, with emigrants returning home on
holiday and people of Irish descent visiting ... With the greater mobility of tourists,
through use of the motor car and also coach tours, accommodation and other ...

A New History of Ireland Volume VII

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VII covers a period of major significance in Ireland's history. It outlines the division of Ireland and the eventual establishment of the Irish Republic. It provides comprehensive coverage of political developments, north and south, as well as offering chapters on the economy, literature in English and Irish, the Irish language, the visual arts, emigration and immigration, and the history of women. The contributors to this volume, all specialists in their field, provide the most comprehensive treatment of these developments of any single-volume survey of twentieth-century Ireland.

An Atlas of Irish History

VIII Infrastructure Until comparatively recently , the physical difficulties of travel in
Ireland were daunting . ... With the twentieth century came the upheavals in the
transport system caused by the introduction of the motor car and the aeroplane ...

An Atlas of Irish History

Fully revised and updated with over 100 beautiful maps, charts and graphs, and a narrative packed with facts this outstanding book examines the main changes that have occurred in Ireland and among the Irish abroad over the past two millennia.

Irish Pub Songs Songbook

“What will my loyal brethren think, when they hear the news, My car it has been
commandeered, by the rebels at Dunluce.” “We'll give you a receipt for it, all
signed by Captain Barr. And when Ireland gets her freedom, boy, you'll get your
motor ...

Irish Pub Songs  Songbook

(Piano/Vocal/Guitar Songbook). Grab a pint and this songbook for an evening of Irish fun! 40 songs, including: All for Me Grog * Black Velvet Band * The Fields of Athenry * I Never Will Marry * I'm a Rover and Seldom Sober * The Irish Rover * Jug of Punch * Leaving of Liverpool * A Nation Once Again * The Rare Ould Times * Whiskey in the Jar * Whiskey, You're the Devil * and more.

Engineering Ireland

The car was much admired and so highly acclaimed that plans were made to go
into volume production . Unfortunately ... Irish entrepreneurs played their part in
promoting and developing the motorcar from the very beginning . They enabled ...

Engineering Ireland

This project of the Irish Academy of Engineering reflects the nature of engineering in all its facets from military, civil, mechanical, electrical and other branches of the profession to the successful completion of projects throughout Ireland. An historical overview of the profession is followed by chapters on the areas of engineering.

The Irish Reports

... Argued and Determined in the Court of Appeal, the High Court of Justice, the
Court of Bankruptcy, in Ireland, and the Irish Land Commission ... There the
claimant was a pedestrian who was struck by the defendant's car at a traffic
crossing.

The Irish Reports


The Irish Reports

Ireland. High Court of Justice. [ HOUSE OF LORDS . ] H. L. 1923 , June 14 .
MOTOR UNION INSURANCE CO . , APPELLANTS ... The respondent insured a
motor car with the appellant company against loss or damage by fire , burglary ,
house ...

The Irish Reports


Criminal Law in Ireland

... at 11.30 pm. on Sunday the 26th September, 1976, the accused and another
man were arrested by the police, without a warrant, in Galway city. They were
informed that they had been arrested for being in possession of a stolen motor
car.

Criminal Law in Ireland


Ireland

Ireland

At last, a book on the real Ireland. This compendium of uncommon knowledge contains the essential information necessary for a true understanding of modern Ireland. Hundreds of entries, ranging form Abbatoir to Zozimus, enlighten, clarify, amuse and entertain. Here are answers to everything you would ever want (& never think) to ask, from the acronym for the Six Counties to the last words of Brendan Behan. The Irish people and their history are all chronicled through the amazing anecdotes and fantastic facts of Irish life. Wide-ranging, informative and authoritative, this book is also wildly funny.

The Legendary Lugs Branigan Ireland s Most Famed Garda

Winters joined his troops, while Hannigan casually walked over to miraculously
find his lost car conveniently parked ... and transported them by taxi, the
bookmaker, like a true general, was sitting in a motor car behind the people's
stands in a ...

The Legendary    Lugs Branigan        Ireland   s Most Famed Garda

Garda and guardian. Protector and punisher. This is ‘Lugs’ Branigan: the man, the legend. The story of ‘Lugs’ Branigan is a tale that is long overdue. It is a story of extraordinary courage and compassion, a story of heroism and altruism, a story of crime, punishment and redemption. The legend of ‘Lugs’’s career as Ireland’s most famous garda (police officer), founded on his physical strength and the manner in which he faced up to the criminal gangs of Dublin over the course of fifty years, is part of Dublin’s folk history. In The Legendary ‘Lugs’ Branigan, bestselling historian Kevin C. Kearns presents a revealing and unvarnished portrait of the man and his life, authenticated by the oral testimony of family members, friends and Garda mates who stood with him through the most harrowing and poignant experiences. Born in the Liberties of Dublin in 1910, Jim Branigan was, by his own admission, a shy, scrawny ‘sissy’ as a lad. Cruelly beaten by bullies in the railway yard where he worked during his teens, he refused to fight back. Yet he went on to become a heavyweight boxing champion and to earn the ‘undisputed reputation as the country's toughest and bravest garda’. Chief Superintendent Edmund Doherty proclaimed him ‘one of those people who become a legend in his own time’. As a garda he refused to carry a baton, relying upon his fists. He took on the vicious ‘animal gangs’ of the 1930s and 40s and in the ‘Battle of Baldoyle’ broke their reign of terror. In the 1950s he quelled the wild ‘rock-and-roll riots’ and tamed the ruffian Teddy boys with their flick-knives. All the while, he was dealing with Dublin's full array of gurriers and criminals. As a devotee of American Western films and books, Branigan emulated the sheriffs by doling out his unique ‘showdown’ brand of summary justice to hooligans and thugs on the street. In the 1960s his riot squad with its Garda ‘posse’ patrolled Dublin's roughest districts in their ‘black Maria’. They contended with the most dangerous rows and riots in the streets, dancehalls and pubs. The cry ‘Lugs is here!’ could instantly scatter a disorderly crowd. Ironically, for all his fame as a tough, fearless garda, he was most beloved for his humanity and compassion. His role as guardian of the battered women of the tenements and as protector and father figure of the city's piteous prostitutes—or ‘pavement hostesses’, as he called them—was unrecorded in the press and hushed up by the Garda brass. Yet, Garda John Collins vouches, ‘Women … oh, he was God to them!’ Upon retirement he entered his ‘old gunfighter’ years; ageing and vulnerable, he became a target for old foes bent on revenge and for ‘young guns’ seeking a quick reputation. A man with a reputation powerful enough to echo through generations of Dubliners, the legendary ‘Lugs’ Branigan finally has a book worthy of his story.

Moving Through Modernity

4 Ulysses, joggerfry and the Hibernian metropolis In 'After the Race', one of the
seemingly slighter stories in Dubliners, Joyce uses the setting of a motorcar road
race to consider elliptically the modernity of Ireland. The Gordon Bennett Race, ...

Moving Through Modernity

The first full-length account of modernism from the perspective of literary geography.