The Naming Of The Dead

The topicality and eye for detail are awesome' Jilly Cooper 'This is possibly the best novel you will read in your life full stop.

The Naming Of The Dead

The sixteenth Inspector Rebus novel from 'Britain's No.1 crime writer' DAILY MIRROR. A murder has been committed - but as the victim was a rapist, recently released from prison, no one is too concerned about the crime. That is, until Detective Inspector John Rebus and DS Siobhan Clarke uncover evidence that a serial killer is on the loose... When Rebus also starts looking into the apparent suicide of an MP, he is abruptly warned off the case, not least because the G8 leaders have gathered in Scotland, and Rebus's bosses want him well out of the way. But Rebus has never been one to stick to the rules, and when Siobhan has a very personal reason for hunting down a riot cop, it looks as though both Rebus and Clarke may be up against their own side...

Death and the Textile Industry in Nigeria

... to live up to their agreement to pay workers' remittances, this naming of the dead reflects changing social relations in northern Nigerian society.

Death and the Textile Industry in Nigeria

This book draws upon thinking about the work of the dead in the context of deindustrialization—specifically, the decline of the textile industry in Kaduna, Nigeria—and its consequences for deceased workers’ families. The author shows how the dead work in various ways for Christians and Muslims who worked in KTL mill in Kaduna, not only for their families who still hope to receive termination remittances, but also as connections to extended family members in other parts of Nigeria and as claims to land and houses in Kaduna. Building upon their actions as a way of thinking about the ways that the dead work for the living, the author focuses on three major themes. The first considers the growth of the city of Kaduna as a colonial construct which, as the capital of the Protectorate of Northern Nigeria, was organized by neighborhoods, by public cemeteries, and by industrial areas. The second theme examines the establishment of textile mills in the industrial area and new ways of thinking about work and labor organization, time regimens, and health, particularly occupational ailments documented in mill clinic records. The third theme discusses the consequences of KTL mill workers’ deaths for the lives of their widows and children. This book will be of interest to scholars of African studies, development studies, anthropology of work, and the history of industrialization.

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

Liturgical texts help us see another Merovingian practice—the naming of the dead for the purpose of remembrance. As Els Rose explains (Chapter 43, ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

The Merovingian era is one of the best studied yet least well known periods of European history. From the fifth to the eighth centuries, the inhabitants of Gaul (what now comprises France, southern Belgium, Luxembourg, Rhineland Germany, and part of modern Switzerland), a mix of Gallo-Roman inhabitants and Germanic arrivals under the political control of the Merovingian dynasty, sought to preserve, use, and reimagine the political, cultural, and religious power of ancient Rome while simultaneously forging the beginnings of what would become medieval European culture. The forty-six essays included in this volume highlight why the Merovingian era is at the heart of historical debates about what happened to Western Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire. The essays demonstrate that the inhabitants of the Merovingian kingdoms in these centuries created a culture that was the product of these traditions and achieved a balance between the world they inherited and the imaginative solutions they bequeathed to Europe. The Handbook highlights new perspectives and scientific approaches that shape our changing view of this extraordinary era by showing that Merovingian Gaul was situated at the crossroads of Europe, connecting the Mediterranean and the British Isles with the Byzantine empire, and it benefited from the global reach of the late Roman Empire. It tells the story of the Merovingian world through archaeology, bio-archaeology, architecture, hagiographic literature, history, liturgy, visionary literature and eschatology, patristics, numismatics, and material culture.

Acts of Naming

These two naming acts encapsulate the two largest movements of the ... The entire narrative which seeks to give the dead a voice by naming them counters the ...

Acts of Naming

Michael Ragussis re-reads the novelistic tradition by arguing the acts of naming--bestowing, revealing, or earning a name; taking away, hiding, or prohibiting a name; slandering, or protecting and serving it--lie at the center of fictional plots from the 18th century to the present. Against the background of philosophic approaches to naming, Acts of Naming reveals the ways in which systems of naming are used to appropriate characters in novels as diverse as Clarissa, Fanny Hill, Oliver Twist, Pierre, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Remembrance of Things Past, and Lolita, and identifies unnaming and renaming as the locus of power in the family's plot to control the child, and more particularly, to rape the daughter. His analysis also treats additional works by Cooper, Brontë, Hawthorne, Eliot, Twain, Conrad, and Faulkner, extending the concept of the naming plot to reimagine the traditions of the novel, comparing American and British plots, female and male plots, inheritance and seduction plots, and so on. Acts of Naming ends with a theoretical exploration of the "magical" power of naming in different eras and in different, even competing, forms of discourse.

Class and Culture in Crime Fiction

The conflicts of space and class in The Naming of the Dead are multiple and multidirectional. Initial focus is on the range of citizens and protest groups ...

Class and Culture in Crime Fiction

The crime fiction world of the late 1970s, with its increasingly diverse landscape, is a natural beginning for this collection of critical studies focusing on the intersections of class, culture and crime—each nuanced with shades of gender, ethnicity, race and politics. The ten new essays herein raise broad and complicated questions about the role of class and culture in transatlantic crime fiction beyond the Golden Age: How is “class” understood in detective fiction, other than as a socioeconomic marker? Can we distinguish between major British and American class concerns as they relate to crime? How politically informed is popular detective fiction in responding to economic crises in Scotland, Ireland, England and the United States? When issues of race and gender intersect with concerns of class and culture, does the crime writer privilege one or another factor? Do values and preoccupations of a primarily middle-class readership get reflected in popular detective fiction?

Bestsellers

The The Naming of the Dead, which was published in 2006 saw Rebus 'retire'. Recognition from readers and critics alike have placed him among the Britain's ...

Bestsellers

This essential guide, now available in a fully updated new edition, is the only available study of all bestselling books, authors and genres since the start of the last century, giving an unique insight into a hundred years of publishing and reading and taking us on a journey into the heart of the British imagination.

Dying for the nation

... shoulder title, equipment and date and place of death to make the naming of the dead possible.27 The 1930 Field Service Regulations added new guidelines ...

Dying for the nation

Death in war matters. It matters to the individual, threatened with their own death, or the death of loved ones. It matters to groups and communities who have to find ways to manage death, to support the bereaved and to dispose of bodies amidst the confusion of conflict. It matters to the state, which has to find ways of coping with mass death that convey a sense of gratitude and respect for the sacrifice of both the victims of war, and those that mourn in their wake. This social and cultural history of Britain in the Second World War places death at the heart of our understanding of the British experience of conflict. Drawing on a range of material, Dying for the nation demonstrates just how much death matters in wartime and examines the experience, management and memory of death. The book will appeal to anyone with an interest in the social and cultural history of Britain in the Second World War.

Anglicanism and the British Empire C 1700 1850

and was told he was dead. When he persisted and asked the father's name, the girl evaded his culturally oVensive request to speak of the dead by saying, ...

Anglicanism and the British Empire  C 1700 1850

An examination of how, during the period 1700-1850, Anglican Christian understanding of the British Empire powerfully shaped the identities both of the people living in British colonies in North America, Bengal, Australia, and New Zealand - including colonists, indigenous peoples, and Negro slaves - and of the English in Britain.

Exit Music

... End (novella) Dead Souls – paperback – ebook Set in Darkness – paperback ... Fleshmarket Close – paperback – ebook The Naming of the Dead – paperback ...

Exit Music

A mugging gone wrong ... or murder? A dissident Russian poet is found dead - at the same time a delegation of Russian businessmen arrives in town. For some, it is crucial that the case is closed quickly, clinically and with the minimum of attention. But DI Rebus and DS Siobhan Clarke believe this is something more than a random attack - especially after a particularly nasty second killing. Then, a brutal and premeditated assault on a local gangster puts Rebus in the frame - and he may not survive long enough to solve anything...

Fleshmarket Close

... End (novella) Dead Souls – paperback – ebook Set in Darkness – paperback ... Fleshmarket Close – paperback – ebook The Naming of the Dead – paperback ...

Fleshmarket Close

The fifteenth Inspector Rebus novel from the SUNDAY TIMES No. 1 bestselling author. An illegal immigrant is found murdered in an Edinburgh housing scheme. Rebus is drawn into the case, but has other problems: his old police station has closed for business, and his masters want him to retire. But Rebus is stubborn. As he investigates, he must visit an asylum seekers' detention centre, deal with the sleazy Edinburgh underworld, and maybe even fall in love... Siobhan meanwhile has problems of her own. A teenager has disappeared and Siobhan must help the family, which means getting close to a convicted rapist. Then there's the small matter of the two skeletons found buried beneath a cellar floor in Fleshmarket Close. An elaborate stunt - but whose, and for what purpose? And how can it tie to the murder on the housing-scheme known as Knoxland?

Secrets of Crime Fiction Classics

Rebus himself makes his own naming of the dead, especially in his thoughts about his brother Michael, and Siobhan, listening to the dead-naming ceremony, ...

Secrets of Crime Fiction Classics

Starting with William Godwin's Caleb Williams and Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly, this book covers in detail the great works of detective fiction--Poe's Dupin stories, Conan Doyle's The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Sayers' Strong Poison, Chandler's The Big Sleep, and Simenon's The Yellow Dog. Lesser-known but important early works are also discussed, including Wilkie Collins' The Woman in White, Emile Gaboriau's M. Lecoq, Anna Katharine Green's The Leavenworth Case and Fergus Hume's The Mystery of a Hansom Cab. More recent titles show increasing variety in the mystery genre, with Patricia Highsmith's criminal-focused The Talented Mr. Ripley and Chester Himes' African-American detectives in Cotton Comes to Harlem. Diversity develops further in Sara Paretsky's tough woman detective V.I. Warshawski in Indemnity Only, Umberto Eco's medievalist and postmodern The Name of the Rose and the forensic feminism of Patricia Cornwell's Postmortem. Notably, the best modern crime fiction has been primarily international--Manuel Vasquez Montalban's Catalan Summer Seas, Ian Rankin's Edinburgh-set The Naming of the Dead, Sweden's Stieg Larsson's The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo and Vikram Chanda's Mumbai-based Sacred Games.

Dear Science and Other Stories

... NourbeSe Philip's Zong! as a diachronic loop, the logic of racism, the naming of the dead and dying, are understood alongside the cyclical structure of ...

Dear Science and Other Stories

In Dear Science and Other Stories Katherine McKittrick presents a creative and rigorous study of black and anticolonial methodologies. Drawing on black studies, studies of race, cultural geography, and black feminism as well as a mix of methods, citational practices, and theoretical frameworks, she positions black storytelling and stories as strategies of invention and collaboration. She analyzes a number of texts from intellectuals and artists ranging from Sylvia Wynter to the electronica band Drexciya to explore how narratives of imprecision and relationality interrupt knowledge systems that seek to observe, index, know, and discipline blackness. Throughout, McKittrick offers curiosity, wonder, citations, numbers, playlists, friendship, poetry, inquiry, song, grooves, and anticolonial chronologies as interdisciplinary codes that entwine with the academic form. Suggesting that black life and black livingness are, in themselves, rebellious methodologies, McKittrick imagines without totally disclosing the ways in which black intellectuals invent ways of living outside prevailing knowledge systems.

Set in Darkness

"Edgar award--winning author of The naming of the dead"--Cover.

Set in Darkness

The eleventh Inspector Rebus novel from 'Britain's best crime novelist' DAILY EXPRESS. Edinburgh is about to become the home of the first Scottish parliament in 300 years. As political passions run high, DI John Rebus is charged with liaison, thanks to the new parliament being resident in Queensbury House, bang in the middle of his patch. But Queensbury House has its own, dark past. Legend has it that a young man was roasted there on a spit by a madman. When the fireplace where the youth died is uncovered another more recent murder victim is found. Days later, in the gardens outside, there is another body and Rebus is under pressure to find instant answers. As the case proceeds, the Inspector finds himself face to face with one of Edinburgh's most notorious criminals...

Naming the Dead

Naming the Dead


The Naming

He fully expects every one to be dead. He can always find another batch of folks to try the experiment again if he wants to come at it from a different ...

The Naming

Marcus had been busy getting his gear together. Fortunately he had come off the ship with his tool belt. Everything in it was like pure gold. Along with two screw drivers, a pair of pliers an awl, some wire and some twine, he also had a good large pocket knife and a hunting knife. He would leave his belt and tools in Rondace with Hank but both knives would go with him. He had also spent time making fine strips of leather to braid for a really strong rope. Areels Aunt wove a good warm travel cloak for him. It would double as a blanket. He was given two horses and a donkey to travel with. He made nice leather leads for the horses, also made a heavy riding pad for his horse. It was a heavy pad for the horses back with a large pocket on each side that hung down in back of his legs. Though it was not strapped to the horse, the weight of the rider held it in place. He made a pack rack for the donkey out of braches and more braided leather straps to hold it in places.

Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society

Mauchaúhomwock The dead . chèpeck , Chepasquâw , A dead woman . ... and amongst States , the naming of their dead Sachims , is one ground of their warres ...

Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society


Northern Lights

terms of the debate concerning the ' naming legends of the western Scandinavian region . THE NAMING LEGENDS Two distinct naming - legend types are discernible : 1. The Intentional Baptising of the Dead - Child Spirit 2.

Northern Lights

Essays showing links between Ireland and Scandinavia in folklore and literature.

Publications

Mauchaúhom.382 The dead man . Mauchaúhomwock The dead . Chépeck . Chepasquâw . Á dead woman . Yo ápapan.383 He that was bere . Sachimaûpan . He that was Prince bere . ... You wrong mee , to wit , in naming my dead . Polakúnnamun .

Publications


Publications of the Narragansett Club Key into the language of America

Mauchaúhom.382 The dead man . Mauchaúhomwock The dead . Chépeck . Chepasquâw . Á dead woman . Yo ápapan.383 He that was bere . Sachimaûpan . He that was Prince bere . ... You wrong mee , to wit , in naming my dead . Posakúnnamun .

Publications of the Narragansett Club  Key into the language of America


Publications of the Narragansett Club

Mauchaúhomwock The dead . Chépeck . Chepasquâw . Á dead woman . Yo ápapan.383 He that was bere . Sachimaûpan . He that was Prince bere . Obf . These expressions they use ... You wrong mee , to wit , in naming my dead . Posakúnnamun .

Publications of the Narragansett Club

Chiefly reprints, including reproductions of the title pages, of the original editions of the works of Roger Williams.