The Natural Explorer: Understanding Your Landscape

Understanding Your Landscape

The Natural Explorer: Understanding Your Landscape

Tristan Gooley, author of THE NATURAL NAVIGATOR demonstrates how it is possible to connect profoundly with the lands we travel through. In THE NATURAL EXPLORER he combines the work of the some of the most insightful travellers of the past two thousand years with his own experience. From the author of How To Read Water, The Sunday Times Book Of The Year. The most rewarding travel experiences do not depend on our destination or the length of our journey, but on our levels of awareness. A short walk can compare with an epic journey, when we take the time to focus on the things that dramatically enrich each journey. Exploration is no longer about hardship or long distances, it is about celebrating the sense of connection and discovery that is possible in all our travels.

Making One's Way in the World

The Footprints and Trackways of Prehistoric People

Making One's Way in the World

The book draws on the evidence of landscape archaeology, palaeoenvironmental studies, ethnohistory and animal tracking to address the neglected topic of how we identify and interpret past patterns of movement in the landscape. It challenges the pessimism of previous generations which regarded prehistoric routes such as hollow ways as generally undatable. The premise is that archaeologists tend to focus on ‘sites’ while neglecting the patterns of habitual movement that made them part of living landscapes. Evidence of past movement is considered in a multi-scalar way from the individual footprint to the long distance path including the traces created in vegetation by animal and human movement. It is argued that routes may be perpetuated over long timescales creating landscape structures which influence the activities of subsequent generations. In other instances radical changes of axes of communication and landscape structures provide evidence of upheaval and social change. Palaeoenvironmental and ethnohistorical evidence from the American North West coast sets the scene with evidence for the effects of burning, animal movement, faeces deposition and transplantation which can create readable routes along which are favoured resources. Evidence from European hunter-gatherer sites hints at similar practices of niche construction on a range of spatial scales. On a local scale, footprints help to establish axes of movement, the locations of lost settlements and activity areas. Wood trackways likewise provide evidence of favoured patterns of movement and past settlement location. Among early farming communities alignments of burial mounds, enclosure entrances and other monuments indicate axes of communication. From the middle Bronze Age in Europe there is more clearly defined evidence of trackways flanked by ditches and fields. Landscape scale survey and excavation enables the dating of trackways using spatial relationships with dated features and many examples indicate long-term continuity of routeways. Where fields flank routeways a range of methods, including scientific approaches, provide dates. Prehistorians have often assumed that Ridgeways provided the main axes of early movement but there is little evidence for their early origins and rather better evidence for early routes crossing topography and providing connections between different environmental zones. The book concludes with a case study of the Weald of South East England which demonstrates that some axes of cross topographic movement used as droveways, and generally considered as early medieval, can be shown to be of prehistoric origin. One reason that dryland routes have proved difficult to recognise is that insufficient attention has been paid to the parts played by riverine and maritime longer distance communication. It is argued that understanding the origins of the paths we use today contributes to appreciation of the distinctive qualities of landscapes. Appreciation will help to bring about effective strategies for conservation of mutual benefit to people and wildlife by maintaining and enhancing corridors of connectivity between different landscape zones including fragmented nature reserves and valued places. In these ways an understanding of past routeways can contribute to sustainable landscapes, communities and quality of life

Walking With The Saints

Walking With The Saints

8 walks following the Pilgrims Routes of Britain. Giving history and extra information about some of our best known ancient routeways. A wonderful companion to these historical and spiritual walkways. Take a person, a time and a place: say Canterbury in 597, St Augustine has just arrived and sets off walking. What is he thinking? How does he find his way across the country? What would he find when he arrived at the various places along the route? Using historical stories and vignettes Cecilia Baker has gathered together to follow his, and other, footsteps we can know him and his world a little better. We can follow his route today but thankfully not have to worry about wild boars, nor highway robbery (hopefully!), nor indeed of falling foul of the monarch or his henchmen as was very much a possibility in the past. England is criss-crossed by a myriad of ancient routes that are being way-marked and walked for the first time in, often, hundreds of years, named after people who have gently faded into history. Through this book you can explore the rich heritage of England while enjoying these ancient paths. You will learn about these routes both from a geographical and historical, but also from a spiritual point of view. Walking has never been more popular both to make us healthier and to enjoy the quality of life that we now crave. We are able to enjoy this pastime today in a way that was never possible in more ancient times. So put on comfortable shoes and take a raincoat, this is Britain after all, and start walking in the footsteps of our ancient ancestors.

The Body Emblazoned

Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture

The Body Emblazoned

An outstanding piece of scholarship and a fascinating read, The Body Emblazoned is a compelling study of the culture of dissection the English Renaissance, which informed intellectual enquiry in Europe for nearly two hundred years. In this outstanding work, Jonathan Sawday explores the dark, morbid eroticism of the Renaissance anatomy theatre, and relates it to not only the great monuments of Renaissance art, but to the very foundation of the modern idea of knowledge. Though the dazzling displays of the exterior of the body in Renaissance literature and art have long been a subject of enquiry, The Body Emblazoned considers the interior of the body, and what it meant to men and women in early modern culture. A richly interdisciplinary work, The Body Emblazoned re-assesses modern understanding of the literature and culture of the Renaissance and its conceptualization of the body within the domains of the medical and moral, the cultural and political.

The Explorer

The Explorer


The Landscape Photographer's Guide to Photoshop

A Visualization-driven Workflow

The Landscape Photographer's Guide to Photoshop

The first step to creating a successful photograph happens before you even click the shutter: the act of visualizing the final result--viewing the landscape in front of you and seeing, in your mind's eye, the final image that you want to create--is the true first act of the creative process. Once you know the end result you want to achieve, connecting the dots from capture through post-processing in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop becomes an intentional and logical act. Instead of randomly (and desperately) pushing and pulling sliders in Photoshop with the hope that your image will look "better," you execute a logical series of steps that closes the gap between the initial capture and your earlier visualization. In The Landscape Photographer's Guide to Photoshop: A Visualization-Driven Workflow, photographer, author, and educator Guy Tal provides you with a roadmap to help you learn to implement such a visualization-driven approach in your landscape photography. Guy covers process, workflow, and the hands-on Photoshop techniques you need to know in order to achieve your expressive goals. In this book, you'll learn: - Techniques and strategies to help you effectively implement visualization in your photographic process - How to perform "gap analysis," where you learn to identify the gaps between the image at any point in time and the desired outcome - How to use Adobe Camera Raw to optimize your digital negative in advance of further editing in Photoshop - The best ways to set up your Photoshop preferences for optimal performance - How best to employ Photoshop's tools and features (such as the Healing Brush, Cloning tool, Cropping tool, and blending modes) - How to become proficient with layers, masks, selections, and actions - Dodging and burning techniques to masterfully direct the viewer's eye - Image-blending techniques for dynamic range and focus stacking - Post-processing strategies for black-and-white conversions, including toning your images - Printing and other output techniques, covering sizing, sharpening, noise reduction, and color management Bringing all of these techniques together, Guy presents a series of image case studies, beginning with his earlier visualization for each image in mind and working through the post-processing, from RAW capture to the final print.

Ayahuasca in My Blood

25 Years of Medicine Dreaming

Ayahuasca in My Blood

Finally, after 25 years of incubation, Peter Gorman's book is out. Ayahuasca in My Blood - 25 Years of Medicine Dreaming concerns his longstanding relationship with the Amazonian visionary medicine. Here's what people have said about it: "Unlike many writing about ayahuasca, Peter Gorman knows this plant and these forests long and well. Explorer, ethnobotanist, writer and raconteur - Gorman is uniquely qualified to tell this incredible tale. A wild mixture of adventure, horror, spirituality, tenderness, and insight, Ayahuasca in My Blood is most highly recommended!" -- Mark J. Plotkin, Ph.D, President, Amazon Conservation Team and author of Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice. "Long before ayahuasca tourism became a pastime for rich gringos, Peter Gorman was knocking around Iquitos and the Amazon. He's traveled the rivers and quaffed the brew with the best (and the worst) of them and been way, way beyond the chrysanthemum on many a dark jungle night. This is the intensely personal story of an old-school jungle rat for whom ayahuasca is not just a hobby, but a life-long quest." -- Dennis McKenna, Ph.D, noted ethnopharmacologist, co-author of The Invisible Landscape, co-founder of the Institute of Natural Products Research and founding board member of the Heffter Research Institute. "I have known and traveled with Peter for almost a decade and was present for a number of the events he included in this book as well as many others. Don Julio was the most powerful man I have ever had the privilege of knowing. Further, as a trained scientist I believe the plant medicine truly offers a doorway to a rich world that needs to be understood in our postmodern lives. This is destined to become a must read for anyone who is serious about understanding the world of the shaman." -- Lynn Chilson - CEO Chilson Enterprises, Inc.

How Stories Mean

How Stories Mean

How Stories Mean gathers together criticism and theory written by short story writers themselves. Several of the essays were newly written for this book. The essays document the establishment and growth of the story form in Canada over the last twenty-five years but the collection is far more than archival. It offers endless insights into how writers write and how they wish to be read. In discussing the nuts and bolts of their craft, the writers are inviting us into their workshops so that we can see how stories are made and come to a more intimate understanding of them. How Stories Mean is the one indispensable book for all those interested in the short story in Canada. Contributors include: Margaret Atwood; Clark Blaise; George Bowering; Keath Fraser; Mavis Gallant; Jack Hodgins; Hugh Hood; Norman Levine; John Metcalf; Alice Munro; Leon Rooke; Carol Shields; Ray Smith; Audrey Thomas and Kent Thompson.

Alien Nation

Alien Nation

An exploration of the complex relationship between science fiction, race and contemporary art.