Rethinking the New Medievalism

Suffice it to say that The New Philology issue of Speculum was a landmark event, setting as it did a virtual new agenda for medieval studies in the United States. The factors leading up to this remarkable series of essays as well as the ...

Rethinking the New Medievalism

Other contributors include Jack Abecassis, Marina Brownlee, Jacqueline Cerquiglini-Toulet, Andreas Kablitz, and Ursula Peters.

New Medieval Literatures

New Medieval Literatures is an annual of work on medieval textual cultures . Its scope is inclusive of work across the theoretical , archival , philological , and historicist methodologies associated with medieval literary studies .

New Medieval Literatures

New Medieval Literatures is an annual containing the best new interdisciplinary work in medieval textual cultures.

The New Medievalism

... subject matters and forms typical of the Middle Ages (which, however, does not seem to have been the case) could one speak of a "modern reception of medieval literature" in the full sense of the concept. ... Cancionew de Baena, ed.

The New Medievalism

"This is a substantial and readable volume, and it is supplied with a rich array of documentation in the notes and bibliography. It deals with a question of critical importance for current research on medieval 'literature': namely, the relationship between this literature and us... This is an important collection, and one may congratulate the editors of their ambitious undertaking."--Paul Zumthor, Speculum.

Neo medievalism and Civil Wars

A New Medievalism ? - - The Case of Sri Lanka MAGNUS NORELL In his article ' The Meaning of New Medievalism ' , Jörg Friedrichs defines that concept as ' a system of overlapping authority and multiple loyalties , held together by a ...

Neo medievalism and Civil Wars

In this book, leading European scholars analyse the proposition that the world has returned to a system of neo-medievalism over a decade after the end of the Cold War.

Medieval Music Making and the Roman de Fauvel

This work has come to be identified as New Medievalism or New Philology , deriving from the titles of two key publications on the subject.24 The tone and aims are perhaps best captured in Stephen Nichols's introduction to the famous ...

Medieval Music Making and the Roman de Fauvel

Publisher Description

New Medieval Literatures

New Medieval Literatures is an annual containing the best new interdisciplinary work in medieval textual studies.

New Medieval Literatures

New Medieval Literatures is an annual containing the best new interdisciplinary work in medieval textual studies. Volume 6 deals in depth with one of the most important of medieval vernacular writers, Geoffrey Chaucer, his closest successor, Thomas Hoccleve, and his most important precursor in England, Marie de France.

Medievalism and the Academy II

While Ragland explains the sensitivity of cultural studies to the medieval , Glejzer finds in the New Medievalism the development of a form of medieval studies that is sensitive to cultural criticism . The New Medievalism , he asserts ...

Medievalism and the Academy II

The second part of Medievalism and the Academy identifies the four specific questions that have come to focus recent scholarship in medievalism: What is difference? what is theory? woman? God?

International Medievalism and Popular Culture

As Holsinger has shown, Bull's 1977 paradigm of the New Medievalism was given new life post 9/11. This is certainly true amongst international relations theorists, who have used the New Medievalism to think through situations of the use ...

International Medievalism and Popular Culture

Today medievalism is increasingly intelligible as a cultural lingua franca, produced in trans- and international contexts with a view to reaching popular international audiences, some of mass scope. This book offers new perspectives on international relations and how global concerns are made available through contemporary medievalist texts. It questions how research in medievalism may help us rethink the terms of internationalism and globalism within popular cultures, ideologies, and political formations. It investigates how the diverse media of medievalism (print; film and television; arts and crafts; fashion; digital media; clubs and fandom) affect its cultural meaning and circulation, and its social function, and engage questions of desire, gender and identity construction. As a whole, International Medievalism and Popular Culture differs from those studies which have concentrated on imaginative appropriations of the middle ages for domestic cultural contexts. It investigates rather how contemporary cultures engage with medievalism to map and model ideas of the international, the trans-national, the cosmopolitan and the global. This book includes examples from Europe, Britain, North America, Australia and the Arab world. It discusses the formation and the impact of popular medievalism in the globalised worlds of Braveheart, Disney and Harry Potter, but it also explores how the contemporary medieval imaginary generates international cultural perspectives, for example in considering Middle Eastern reception of Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven, the Byzantinism of Julia Kristeva, and Hedley Bull's postnationalist 'new medievalism'. International Medievalism in Popular Culture is an important contribution to medieval studies, cultural studies, and historical studies. It will be of value to undergraduate, postgraduate and academic readers, as well as to all interested in popular culture or medievalism.

Corporate Medievalism II

Our Future is Our Past: Corporate Medievalism in Dystopian Fiction Amy S. Kaufman When next you eat a golden Peach And lightly throw away the pit, Consider how it shines with Life — God dwelling in the midst of it.

Corporate Medievalism II

Essays on the post-modern reception and interpretation of the Middle Ages, with a particular focus on its relationship with business and finance.

The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages

Brian Stock, and Brigitte Cazelle as examples of ''New Medievalism,'' which affirms ''the desire to draw the line more sharply between Modernity and its successor,'' postmodernism. What follows is a statement full of implications for ...

The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages

This collection of essays argues that any valid theory of the modern should—indeed must—reckon with the medieval. Offering a much-needed correction to theorists such as Hans Blumenberg, who in his Legitimacy of the Modern Age describes the “modern age” as a complete departure from the Middle Ages, these essays forcefully show that thinkers from Adorno to Žižek have repeatedly drawn from medieval sources to theorize modernity. To forget the medieval, or to discount its continued effect on contemporary thought, is to neglect the responsibilities of periodization. In The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages, modernists and medievalists, as well as scholars specializing in eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century comparative literature, offer a new history of theory and philosophy through essays on secularization and periodization, Marx’s (medieval) theory of commodity fetishism, Heidegger’s scholasticism, and Adorno’s nominalist aesthetics. One essay illustrates the workings of medieval mysticism in the writing of Freud’s most famous patient, Daniel Paul Schreber, author of Memoirs of My Nervous Illness (1903). Another looks at Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Empire, a theoretical synthesis whose conscientious medievalism was the subject of much polemic in the post-9/11 era, a time in which premodernity itself was perceived as a threat to western values. The collection concludes with an afterword by Fredric Jameson, a theorist of postmodernism who has engaged with the medieval throughout his career. Contributors: Charles D. Blanton, Andrew Cole, Kathleen Davis, Michael Hardt, Bruce Holsinger, Fredric Jameson, Ethan Knapp, Erin Labbie, Jed Rasula, D. Vance Smith, Michael Uebel

Politics of Temporalization

For discussion of the new Middle Ages and neofeudalism, see Wollenberg's Chapter 4, “Anxious Returns: The New Feudalism and New Medievalism,” in Medieval Imagery. 13. See, among others, Stephen J. Kobrin's “Back to the Future,” Jörg ...

Politics of Temporalization

A postcolonial study of the conceptualization of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Latin America as medieval and oriental If Spain and Portugal were perceived as backward in the nineteenth century—still tainted, in the minds of European writers and thinkers, by more than a whiff of the medieval and Moorish—Ibero-America lagged even further behind. Originally colonized in the late fifteenth century, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil were characterized by European travelers and South American elites alike as both feudal and oriental, as if they retained an oriental-Moorish character due to the centuries-long presence of Islam in the Iberian Peninsula. So, Nadia R. Altschul observes, the Scottish metropolitan writer Maria Graham (1785-1842) depicted the Chile in which she found herself stranded after the death of her sea captain husband as a premodern, precapitalist, and orientalized place that could only benefit from the free trade imperialism of the British. Domingo F. Sarmiento (1811-1888), the most influential Latin American writer and statesman of his day, conceived of his own Euro-American creole class as medieval in such works as Civilization and Barbarism: The Life of Juan Facundo Quiroga (1845) and Recollections of a Provincial Past (1850), and wrote of the inherited Moorish character of Spanish America in his 1883 Conflict and Harmony of the Races in America. Moving forward into the first half of the twentieth century, Altschul explores the oriental character that Gilberto Freyre assigned to Portuguese colonization in his The Masters and the Slaves (1933), in which he postulated the "Mozarabic" essence of Brazil. In Politics of Temporalization, Altschul examines the case of South America to ask more broadly what is at stake—what is harmed, what is excused—when the present is temporalized, when elements of "the now" are characterized as belonging to, and consequently imposed upon, a constructed and othered "past."

Medievalism and the Modernist Temper

For reflections on what has come to be called the "New Medievalism," see Stephen G. Nichols, "The New Medievalism: Tradition and Discontinuity in Medieval Culture," in The New Medievalism, ed. Marina S. Brownlee, Kevin Brownlee, ...

Medievalism and the Modernist Temper

"While modernists are currently so mired in the question of who did what to whom during World War II that they have lost a sense of intellectual urgency, the study of medieval literature and culture has never been more alive or at a more interestingly innovative stage." -- from the Introduction Medievalism and the Modernist Temper brings major and outstanding younger medievalists into confrontation with the notion of medievalism itself in order to chart the directions the field has taken in the past and may take in the future. The collection not only explores modern conceptions of cultural patterns in the Middle Ages but also makes a significant contribution to the wider field of sociology of knowledge in the humanities. In its largest sense, it is a study of the institution of modern scholarship, using medieval literature as a focus. Contributors are R. Howard Bloch, Alain Boureau, E. Jane Burns, Michael Camille, Alain Corbellari, John M. Ganim, John M. Graham, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Suzanne Fleischman, David Hult, Carl Landauer, Seth Lerer, Stephen G. Nichols, Per Nykrog, and Jeffrey M. Peck. "This highly original, polemical and paradigm-shifting book challenges academics to look more closely at the ideological foundations of the very disciplines we practice. Perhaps its most extraordinary contribution to literary studies as a whole (and it emerges with luminous clarity from the editors' Introduction) is to offer a new, historicized means of reviving what was once known as 'source studies.'" -- Jody Enders, University of California, Santa Barbara

Globalisation and Governance in the Pacific Islands

We might not be seeing the new medievalism in the developed countries. The transnationalisation of crime is not new. Nor are backward linkages to homelands that generate the criminal organisations. But what might be novel is the ...

Globalisation and Governance in the Pacific Islands

"The Pacific Islands are feeling the effects of globalisation. Free trade in sugar and garments is threatening two of Fiji's key industries. At the same time other opportunities are emerging. Labour migration is growing in importance, and Pacific governments are calling for more access to Australia's labour market. Fiji has joined Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu and Kiribati as a remittance economy, with thousands of its citizens working overseas. Meantime, Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands grapple with an older kind of globalisation in which overseas companies exploit mineral and forest resources. The Pacific Islands confront unique problems of governance in this era of globalisation. The modern, democratic state often fits awkwardly with traditional ways of doing politics in that part of the world. Just as often, politicians in the Pacific exploit tradition or invent it to serve modern political purposes. The contributors to this volume examine Pacific globalisation and governance from a wide range of perspectives. They come from Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Hawai'i, the Federated States of Micronesia, Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand and Jamaica as well as Australia."--Publisher's description.

Rhetoric in an Antifoundational World

Questions of medievalism have become central to the medievalist as a way to get outside particular methodological hermeticisms , outside contemporary foundations , whether they be New Critical ( which is still very much alive ) ...

Rhetoric in an Antifoundational World

In this brilliant collection, literary scholars, philosophers, and teachers inquire into the connections between antifoundational philosophy and the rhetorical tradition. What happens to literary studies and theory when traditional philosophical foundations are disavowed? What happens to the study of teaching and writing when antifoundationalism is accepted? What strategies for human understanding are possible when the weaknesses of antifoundationalism are identified? This volume offers answers in classic essays by such thinkers as Richard Rorty, Terry Eagleton, and Stanley Fish, and in many new essays never published before. The contributors to this book explore the nexus of antifoundationalism and rhetoric, critique that nexus, and suggest a number of pedagogical and theoretical alternatives. The editors place these statements into a context that is both critical and evaluative, and they provide for voices that dissent from the antifoundational perspective and that connect specific, practical pedagogies to the broader philosophical statements. For those with an interest in rhetoric, philosophy, comparative literature, or the teaching of composition, this book sets forth a wealth of thought-provoking ideas. "I have nothing but praise for this work -- a masterful treatment of the question, What positive intellectual projects are possible within a world that radically questions the existence of philosophical foundations?" -- Steven Mailloux, University of California, Irvine

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

31 Jorg Friedrichs, 'The Meaning of New Medievalism', European Journal of International Relations, 7 (2001), 476. 32 Friedrichs, 'The Meaning of New Medievalism', 477. 33 John Gerard Ruggie, 'Territoriality and Beyond: Problematizing ...

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

The purpose of this volume is to explore the medieval inheritance of modern international relations. Recent years have seen a flourishing of work on the history of international political thought, but the bulk of this has focused on the early modern and modern periods, leaving continuities with the medieval world largely ignored. The medieval is often used as a synonym for the barbaric and obsolete, yet this picture does not match that found in relevant work in the history of political thought. The book thus offers a chance to correct this misconception of the evolution of Western international thought, highlighting that the history of international thought should be regarded as an important dimension of thinking about the international and one that should not be consigned to history departments. Questions addressed include: what is the medieval influence on modern conception of rights, law, and community? how have medieval ideas shaped modern conceptions of self-determination, consent, and legitimacy? are there ‘medieval’ answers to ‘modern’ questions? is the modern world still working its way through the Middle Ages? to what extent is the ‘modern outlook’ genuinely secular? is there a ‘theology’ of international relations? what are the implications of continuity for predominant historical narrative of the emergence and expansion of international society? Medieval and modern are certainly different; however, this collection of essays proceeds from the conviction that the modern world was not built on a new plot with new building materials. Instead, it was constructed out of the rubble, that is, the raw materials, of the Middle Ages.This will be of great interest to students and scholars of IR, IR theory and political theory. .

Rhetorical culture in late antiquity and the Middle Ages

The New Medievalism , Baltimore / London 1991 , 183–200 with S. Spence , Myrrha , Myrrha in the Well : Metonymy and Interpretation in Inferno XXXIV , in : Dante Studies 103 ( 1985 ) 15–36 . Generally , incestual desire is posed in ...

Rhetorical culture in late antiquity and the Middle Ages

DieMillennium-Studien wollen Grenzen überschreiten, Grenzen zwischen den Epochen und regionalen Räumen wie auch Grenzen zwischen den Disziplinen. Millennium ist international, transdisziplinär und epochenübergreifend ausgerichtet. Das Herausgebergremium und der Beirat repräsentieren ein breites Spektrum von Fächern: Kunst- und literaturwissenschaftliche Beiträge kommen ebenso zu ihrem Rechtwie historische, theologische und philosophische, Beiträge zu den lateinischen und griechischen Kulturen ebenso wie zu den orientalischen.

Medievalism in North America

Bernard Rosenthal and Paul E. Szarmach ( Binghamton , New York : Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies , 1989 ) : 85-111 ; Nadia Margolis , Joan of Arc in History , Literature , and Film ( New York : Garland , 1990 ) ; Ingvald ...

Medievalism in North America

Studies on the influence of the middle ages, and in particular the Arthurian legends, on the culture of North America.

Difference and Identity in Francia and Medieval France

Yet we also hoped that looking toward the periphery of medieval society would generate new ideas about the center and about the dynamics of inclusion , as well as exclusion . In the event , the resulting collection is about not just the ...

Difference and Identity in Francia and Medieval France

Difference in medieval France was not solely a marker for social exclusion, provoking feelings of disgust and disaffection, but it could also create solidarity and sympathy among groups. Contributors to this volume address inclusion and exclusion from a variety of perspectives, presenting a fresh, intriguing perspective on the notion of belonging in the medieval world.

Medieval Translations and Cultural Discourse

textuality'.14 The notion here of 'medieval textuality', which encompasses both the historical context, ... The theoretical model of New Philology underlies the New Medievalists' objective of a reconstruction of our very notion ofthe ...

Medieval Translations and Cultural Discourse

"Throughout the middle ages, many Francophone texts - chansons de geste, medieval romance, works by Chrâetien de Troyes and Marie de France - were widely translated in north-western Europe, in the process reflecting the new cultures in which they appeared. Dr Rikhardsdottir argues that such translations, demonstrating cultural movement and encounters, provide a rich opportunity to study changes in linguistic and cultural identity. By close comparison of a number of these texts, examining the various modifications made, and drawing on critical discourses ranging from post-colonial criticism to translation theory, the author explores the complexities of cultural dialogue and dissent. This approach both recognises and foregrounds the complex matrix of influence, resistance and transformations within the languages and cultural traditions of medieval Europe, revealing the undercurrents of cultural conflict in medieval textuality"--P. [4] of cover.