The New Muslims of Post Conquest Iran

The New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran answers this important question for Iran by focusing on the role of memory and its revision and erasure in the ninth to eleventh centuries.

The New Muslims of Post Conquest Iran

How do converts to a religion come to feel an attachment to it? The New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran answers this important question for Iran by focusing on the role of memory and its revision and erasure in the ninth to eleventh centuries. During this period, the descendants of the Persian imperial, religious and historiographical traditions not only wrote themselves into starkly different early Arabic and Islamic accounts of the past but also systematically suppressed much knowledge about pre-Islamic history. The result was both a new 'Persian' ethnic identity and the pairing of Islam with other loyalties and affiliations, including family, locale and sect. This pioneering study examines revisions to memory in a wide range of cases, from Iran's imperial and administrative heritage to the Prophet Muhammad's stalwart Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi, and to memory of Iranian scholars, soldiers and rulers in the mid-seventh century.

Arabs and Iranians in the Islamic Conquest Narrative

Memory and Identity Construction in Islamic Historiography, 750–1050 Scott
Savran ... Sarah Bowen Savant, The New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran:
Tradition, Memory, and Conversion (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2013).

Arabs and Iranians in the Islamic Conquest Narrative

Arabs and Iranians in the Islamic Conquest Narrative analyzes how early Muslim historians merged the pre-Islamic histories of the Arab and Iranian peoples into a didactic narrative culminating with the Arab conquest of Iran. This book provides an in-depth examination of Islamic historical accounts of the encounters between representatives of these two peoples that took place in the centuries prior to the coming of Islam. By doing this, it uncovers anachronistic projections of dynamic identity and political discourses within the contemporaneous Islamic world. It shows how the formulaic placement of such embellishment within the context of the narrative served to justify the Arabs’ rise to power, whilst also explaining the fall of the Iranian Sasanian empire. The objective of this book is not simply to mine Islamic historical chronicles for the factual data they contain about the pre-Islamic period, but rather to understand how the authors of these works thought about this era. By investigating the intersection between early Islamic memory, identity construction, and power discourses, this book will benefit researchers and students of Islamic history and literature and Middle Eastern Studies.

Routledge Revivals Medieval Islamic Civilization 2006

The New Muslims of Post-conquest Iran. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
, 2013. Van Zutphen, Marjolijn. Faramārz, the Sistāni Hero: Texts and Traditions
of the Faramarzname and the Persian Epic Cycle. Leiden and Boston: Brill, ...

Routledge Revivals  Medieval Islamic Civilization  2006

Islamic civilization flourished in the Middle Ages across a vast geographical area that spans today's Middle and Near East. First published in 2006, Medieval Islamic Civilization examines the socio-cultural history of the regions where Islam took hold between the 7th and 16th centuries. This important two-volume work contains over 700 alphabetically arranged entries, contributed and signed by international scholars and experts in fields such as Arabic languages, Arabic literature, architecture, history of science, Islamic arts, Islamic studies, Middle Eastern studies, Near Eastern studies, politics, religion, Semitic studies, theology, and more. Entries also explore the importance of interfaith relations and the permeation of persons, ideas, and objects across geographical and intellectual boundaries between Europe and the Islamic world. This reference work provides an exhaustive and vivid portrait of Islamic civilization and brings together in one authoritative text all aspects of Islamic civilization during the Middle Ages. Accessible to scholars, students and non-specialists, this resource will be of great use in research and understanding of the roots of today's Islamic society as well as the rich and vivid culture of medieval Islamic civilization.

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Alexander the Great

The pre-Islamic Alexander cannot, therefore, be studied in isolation
fromtheturbulenthistoryofpost-conquestIran. ... 3 Cf. Sarah Bowen Savant, The
New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran: Tradition, Memory, and Conversion (New
York: Cambridge ...

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Alexander the Great

Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Alexander the Great has something for everyone who is interested in the life and afterlife of Alexander III of Macedon, the Great.

Genealogy and Knowledge in Muslim Societies

These 9 case studies link genealogical knowledge to particular circumstances in which it was created, circulated and promoted. They stress the malleability of kinship and memory, and the interests this malleability serves.

Genealogy and Knowledge in Muslim Societies

Published in association with The Aga Khan University, Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilisations.

The Excellence of the Arabs

In The Excellence of the Arabs, the celebrated litterateur Ibn Qutaybah locks horns with those members of his society who belittled Arabness and vaunted the glories of Persian heritage and culture.

The Excellence of the Arabs

A spirited defense of Arab identity from a time of political unrest In ninth-century Abbasid Baghdad, the social prestige attached to claims of Arab identity had begun to decline. In The Excellence of the Arabs, the celebrated litterateur Ibn Qutaybah locks horns with those members of his society who belittled Arabness and vaunted the glories of Persian heritage and culture. Instead, he upholds the status of Arabs and their heritage in the face of criticism and uncertainty. The Excellence of the Arabs is in two parts. In the first, Arab Preeminence, which takes the form of an extended argument for Arab privilege, Ibn Qutaybah accuses his opponents of blasphemous envy. In the second, The Excellence of Arab Learning, he describes the fields of knowledge in which he believed pre-Islamic Arabians excelled, including knowledge of the stars, divination, horse husbandry, and poetry. By incorporating extensive excerpts from the poetic heritage—“the archive of the Arabs”—Ibn Qutaybah aims to demonstrate that poetry is itself sufficient evidence of Arab superiority. Eloquent and forceful, The Excellence of the Arabs addresses a central question at a time of great social flux, at the dawn of classical Muslim civilization: What does it mean to be Arab?

Arab Conquests and Early Islamic Historiography

In The Encounter of Eastern Christianity with Early Islam. Edited by Emmanouela
Grypeou, Mark Swanson, and David Thomas. Leiden: Brill, 2005:33–44. Savant,
Sarah Bowen. The New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran: Tradition, Memory, and ...

Arab Conquests and Early Islamic Historiography

Of the available sources for Islamic history between the seventh and eighth centuries CE, few are of greater importance than al-Baladhuri's Kitab Futu? al-buldan (The Book of the Conquest of Lands). Written in Arabic by a ninth-century Muslim scholar working at the court of the 'Abbasid caliphs, the Futu?'s content covers many important matters at the beginning of Islamic history. It informs its audience of the major events of the early Islamic conquests, the settlement of Muslims in the conquered territories and their experiences therein, and the origins and development of the early Islamic state. Questions over the text's construction, purpose, and reception, however, have largely been ignored in current scholarship. This is despite both the text's important historical material and its crucial early date of creation. It has become commonplace for researchers to turn to the Futu? for information on a specific location or topic, but to ignore the grander – and, in many ways, more straightforward – questions over the text's creation and limitations. This book looks to correct these gaps in knowledge by investigating the context, form, construction, content, and early reception history of al-Baladhuri's text.

Shahnameh

But it is also a beginning, in that a new tradition derives from it; the selfimage of
the people whose putative ancestors are ... early postconquest years in the
writing of a Zoroastrian (i.e. an adherent of the religion of preIslamic Iran) of the
period: ...

Shahnameh

Among the great works of world literature, perhaps one of the least familiar to English readers is the Shahnameh: ThePersian Book of Kings, the national epic of Persia. This prodigious narrative, composed by the poet Ferdowsi between the years 980 and 1010, tells the story of pre- Islamic Iran, beginning in the mythic time of Creation and continuing forward to the Arab invasion in the seventh century. As a window on the world, Shahnameh belongs in the company of such literary masterpieces as Dante’s Divine Comedy, the plays of Shakespeare, the epics of Homer— classics whose reach and range bring whole cultures into view. In its pages are unforgettable moments of national triumph and failure, human courage and cruelty, blissful love and bitter grief. In tracing the roots of Iran, Shahnameh initially draws on the depths of legend and then carries its story into historical times, when ancient Persia was swept into an expanding Islamic empire. Now Dick Davis, the greatest modern translator of Persian poetry, has revisited that poem, turning the finest stories of Ferdowsi’s original into an elegant combination of prose and verse. For the first time in English, in the most complete form possible, readers can experience Shahnameh in the same way that Iranian storytellers have lovingly conveyed it in Persian for the past thousand years.

Discourse and the Construction of Society

The materials that concern us are taken from a short text written in 1008 CE,
roughly three and a half centuries after the Islamic conquest of Zoroastrian Iran.1
Known as the Pahlavi Rivāyat of FarnbagSrōš, it consists of thirtyfour questions ...

Discourse and the Construction of Society

Without overlooking the role of coercive force in the maintenance (or overthrow) of social structures, Lincoln argues his thesis with rich illustrations drawn from such diverse areas as Platonic philosophy, the Upanishads of India, ancient Celtic banquets, professional wrestling, and the Spanish Civil War. This wide-ranging interdisciplinary study--which draws on works in history, semiotics, anthropology, sociology, classics, and indology--offers challenging new insights into the complex dynamics of social cohesion and change. The second edition includes three new chapters, new images, and an updated bibliography.

A History of Islamic Societies

The reasons for the relatively rapid success of the Arab - Muslim conquests are
not hard to find . ... over militarily weakened powers , and were consolidated
because local populations were content to accept the new regime . ... Medinians
decided on the two basic principles of the post - conquest government that the
bedouins would be ... Basra , at the head of the Persian Gulf , was strategically
located for easy communication with Medina and for Arab expeditions into
southern Iran .

A History of Islamic Societies

An accessible worldwide history of Muslim societies provides updated coverage of each country and region, in a volume that discusses their origins and evolution while offering insight into historical processes that shaped contemporary Islam and surveying its growing influence. Simultaneous. (Social Science)

The Cambridge History of Iran

LITERATURE. AFTER. THE. MUSLIM. CONQUEST. In the preceding volume a
survey was made of that part of extant Mazdaean literature the content of which
could have been known in the Sasanian era, even though the books were
probably ...

The Cambridge History of Iran

The volume provides a comprehensive record of the formative centuries of Islam in Iran.

The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East States resources and armies

64 I would suggest that both the relative absence of amșār in Syria in the
immediately post - conquest period and the existence of the ... extent , 65 be
explained by the fact that the already - existing system was simply taken over and
adapted to the new circumstances . ... 66 The word may be Aramaic ( Morony ,
Iraq after the Muslim Conquest , 135 ) or Iranian in origin ( Shahid I , 392 ; II , 239
- 240 ) .

The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East  States  resources  and armies

Vol. 2 : papers of the 2nd workshop on late antiquity and early Islam. Vol. 3 : papers of the 3rd workshop on late antiquity and early Islam. Vol. 6 : papers of the 6th workshop on late antiquity and early Islam. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Problems in the literary source material / edited by Averil Cameron and Lawrence I. Conrad -- 2. Land use and settlement patterns / edited by G.R.D. King and Averil Cameron -- 3. States, resources, and armies / edited by Averil Cameron -- 6. Elites old and new in the Byzantine and early Islamic Near East / edited by John Haldon and Lawrence I. Conrad.

Arab Byzantine Relations in Early Islamic Times

420 John Haldon of the new Islamic polity ? 64 I would suggest that both the
relative absence of amșār in Syria in the immediately post - conquest period and
the existence of the ajnād can , at ... 66 The word may be Aramaic ( Morony , Iraq
after the Muslim Conquest , 135 ) or Iranian in origin ( Shahid I , 392 ; II , 239 -
240 ) .

Arab Byzantine Relations in Early Islamic Times

Surrounded on all sides by hostile nations and peoples, Islam began life as a religion in a wary manner. This collection begins and ends with war and considers the uneasy relationship between the Arabs and the Byzantine civilization from which they learned a great deal during uneasy periods of peace.

Cotton Climate and Camels in Early Islamic Iran

As a result of these considerations, wealthy Muslims who wished to become
landowners invested in digging qanats and ... in a postconquest situation, the
connection between investment and irrigation, and the connection between
Muslims in ...

Cotton  Climate  and Camels in Early Islamic Iran

A boom in the production and export of cotton made Iran the richest region of the Islamic caliphate in the ninth and tenth centuries. Yet in the eleventh century, Iran's impressive agricultural economy entered a steep decline, bringing the country's primacy to an end. Richard W. Bulliet advances several provocative theses to explain these hitherto unrecognized historical events. According to Bulliet, the boom in cotton production directly paralleled the spread of Islam, and Iran's agricultural decline stemmed from a significant cooling of the climate that lasted for over a century. The latter phenomenon also prompted Turkish nomadic tribes to enter Iran for the first time, establishing a political dominance that would last for centuries. Substantiating his argument with innovative quantitative research and recent scientific discoveries, Bulliet first establishes the relationship between Iran's cotton industry and Islam and then outlines the evidence for what he terms the "Big Chill." Turning to the story of the Turks, he focuses on the lucrative but temperature-sensitive industry of cross-breeding one-humped and two-humped camels. He concludes that this unusual concatenation of events had a profound and long-lasting impact not just on the history of Iran but on the development of world affairs in general.

Before and After Muhammad

1 Comparing the opening chapters of the Cambridge history of Islam (1970) with
those of its successor, the New ... and the Arab conquest of Iran (2008), revising
our understanding of underdocumented Sasanid Iran by using both Arabic and ...

Before and After Muhammad

Islam emerged amid flourishing Christian and Jewish cultures, yet students of Antiquity and the Middle Ages mostly ignore it. Despite intensive study of late Antiquity over the last fifty years, even generous definitions of this period have reached only the eighth century, whereas Islam did not mature sufficiently to compare with Christianity or rabbinic Judaism until the tenth century. Before and After Muhammad suggests a new way of thinking about the historical relationship between the scriptural monotheisms, integrating Islam into European and West Asian history. Garth Fowden identifies the whole of the First Millennium--from Augustus and Christ to the formation of a recognizably Islamic worldview by the time of the philosopher Avicenna--as the proper chronological unit of analysis for understanding the emergence and maturation of the three monotheistic faiths across Eurasia. Fowden proposes not just a chronological expansion of late Antiquity but also an eastward shift in the geographical frame to embrace Iran. In Before and After Muhammad, Fowden looks at Judaism, Christianity, and Islam alongside other important developments in Greek philosophy and Roman law, to reveal how the First Millennium was bound together by diverse exegetical traditions that nurtured communities and often stimulated each other.

What Went Wrong

Some were pre-Islamic, such as the solar calendars in use at the time of the
conquest in Egypt and Iran. Others were post-Islamic. The Ottoman maliye or
financial year was a solar adaptation of the Muslim era, using Muslim dates with
Eastern ...

What Went Wrong

For many centuries, the world of Islam was in the forefront of human achievement--the foremost military and economic power in the world, the leader in the arts and sciences of civilization. Christian Europe, a remote land beyond its northwestern frontier, was seen as an outer darkness of barbarism and unbelief from which there was nothing to learn or to fear. And then everything changed, as the previously despised West won victory after victory, first in the battlefield and the marketplace, then in almost every aspect of public and even private life. In this intriguing volume, Bernard Lewis examines the anguished reaction of the Islamic world as it tried to understand why things had changed--how they had been overtaken, overshadowed, and to an increasing extent dominated by the West. Lewis provides a fascinating portrait of a culture in turmoil. He shows how the Middle East turned its attention to understanding European weaponry and military tactics, commerce and industry, government and diplomacy, education and culture. Lewis highlights the striking differences between the Western and Middle Eastern cultures from the 18th to the 20th centuries through thought-provoking comparisons of such things as Christianity and Islam, music and the arts, the position of women, secularism and the civil society, the clock and the calendar. Hailed in The New York Times Book Review as "the doyen of Middle Eastern studies," Bernard Lewis is one of the West's foremost authorities on Islamic history and culture. In this striking volume, he offers an incisive look at the historical relationship between the Middle East and Europe.

Parsism

INTRODUCTION As Parsism we qualify that Iranian religion which has survived
from the appearance of Islam until modern times ... we may arrive at 600 B.C. , at
the latest , as the approximate dating of the post - Gāthic name , that is , a certain
number of years before the Achaemenids . ... During the first centuries after the
fall of the Sassanids and the Islamic conquest of Iran certain Zoroastrians must
have ...

Parsism


The United Arab Emirates Yearbook 2005

Pearls were already in use in the prehistoric era , but it was during the Roman
era that the trade reached new heights . Pearling ... By 637 AD , the Islamic
armies were using Julfar ( Ra's al - Khaimah ) as a staging post for the conquest
of Iran .

The United Arab Emirates Yearbook 2005


United Arab Emirates Yearboook 2006

Pearls were already in use in the prehistoric era , but it was during the Roman
era that the trade reached new heights . Pearling ... By 637 AD , the Islamic
armies were using Julfar ( Ra's al - Khaimah ) as a staging post for the conquest
of Iran .

United Arab Emirates Yearboook 2006

United Arab Emirates - Yearbooks.

Historical and cultural aspects

The Qazi had an open place , where he used to hear both Muslims and non -
Muslims and give his judgment in the presence of two or more witnesses .
Muslims and non - Muslims , high and low , received the same treatment . Even
the ... IRAN AFTER THE MUSLIM CONQUEST . Iran was ... They were also
employed in the civil administration and found very useful under their new
masters . But the ...

Historical and cultural aspects