Finding a Million-Star Hotel

An Astro-Tourist’s Guide to Dark Sky Places

Finding a Million-Star Hotel

Bob Mizon, one of the world’s best known campaigners against the veil of light pollution that has taken away the starry sky from most of the world’s population, takes readers to a hundred places in the UK and the USA where the wonders of the night sky might still be enjoyed in perfect or near-perfect night skies. Visiting small hotels and simple campsites, and savoring vast dark-sky reserves where the night sky is actively protected, The Million-Star Hotel celebrates the black skies of yesteryear – which may become a reality for more and more of us as modern technology reins in lighting and puts it only where needed. How can you prepare for your stay beneath the stars? What astronomy can you do during the daytime? What kind of equipment will you need? Questions such as these are answered, and if town dwellers return inspired – and, Bob hopes, also inspired to look with fresh eyes at their own local lighting – there is enough information here for them to equip themselves for some urban astronomy too.

Binocular Stargazing

Binocular Stargazing

Many Stargazers Assume They Must Invest Hundreds or even thousands of dollars in equipment before they can enjoy the wonders of the night sky. The truth is, though, that all you need is a simple pair of binoculars. This handy guide explains how to choose binoculars and use them to observe everything from comets to solar eclipses. Ideal for amateur astronomers of all ages, Binocular Stargazing is the perfect way to see the night sky through new eyes.

How to Read the Night Sky

A New and Easy Way to Know the Stars, Planets, and Constellations

How to Read the Night Sky


The Deep-Sky Observer’s Year

A Guide to Observing Deep-Sky Objects Throughout the Year

The Deep-Sky Observer’s Year

Deep-sky observing is perhaps the most popular field for amateur astronomers, and now that commercially-made large-aperture telescopes are becoming relatively inexpensive it can be doubly rewarding. The price of specialist CCD cameras is dropping as well, so many amateurs can make beautiful images of objects that ten years ago were strictly the province of professional observatories. One of the biggest dilemmas faced by non-professional observers remains what to look at - which interesting objects are visible at a particular time of year. Following an introduction describing how and what to observe, The Deep-Sky Observer's Year provides a month-by-month guide to the best objects to view. Each is given a "star rating" according to how difficult it is to observe. In addition to images produced by amateur astronomers and photographs from the archives of NASA, ESA and ESO, there is background information about the objects along with lots of useful tips, hints, and resources (especially about what's available on the Internet) for deep-sky observers.

Star-Hopping

Your Visa to Viewing the Universe

Star-Hopping

Star-hopping--using easily seen bright stars to locate fainter celestial objects in the night sky--is a basic and essential technique for all star gazers, novice and veteran alike. Robert Garfinkle shows you how to locate the many stellar objects usually overlooked by the untrained eye. Two or more detailed star hops for each month of the year, which can be read in any order, take you on a trip through the night sky, opening new doors of discovery and reinforcing star-hopping methods and techniques. With Garfinkle's able guidance, learn to take the Messier Marathon--a night-long hop across the skies. Additional basic astronomy skills are carefully outlined, including reading star charts, finding celestial directions, understanding telescope types, and using light pollution filters. A lively history of the universe and the ancient myths and legends of the sky round out the text. This is an essential guide for sky gazers who want to get the most out of their evening sky explorations.

Astronomy Hacks

Tips and Tools for Observing the Night Sky

Astronomy Hacks

Why use the traditional approach to study the stars when you can turn computers, handheld devices, and telescopes into out-of-this-world stargazing tools? Whether you're a first timer or an advanced hobbyist, you'll find Astronomy Hacks both useful and fun. From upgrading your optical finder to photographing stars, this book is the perfect cosmic companion.This handy field guide covers the basics of observing, and what you need to know about tweaking, tuning, adjusting, and tricking out a 'scope. Expect priceless tips and tools for using a Dobsonian Telescope, the large-aperture telescope you can inexpensively build in your garage. Get advice on protocols involved with using electronics including in dark places without ruining the party.Astronomy Hacks begins the space exploration by getting you set up with the right equipment for observing and admiring the stars in an urban setting. Along for the trip are first rate tips for making most of observations. The hacks show you how to: Dark-Adapt Your Notebook Computer Choose the Best Binocular Clean Your Eyepieces and Lenses Safely Upgrade Your Optical Finder Photograph the Stars with Basic Equipment The O'Reilly Hacks series has reclaimed the term "hacking" to mean innovating, unearthing, and creating shortcuts, gizmos, and gears. With these hacks, you don't dream it-you do it--and Astronomy Hacks brings space dreams to life. The book is essential for anyone who wants to get the most out of an evening under the stars and have memorable celestial adventures.

Deep Sky

Deep Sky


Skywatching

Skywatching

Authoritative, lavishly photographed and illustrated guides to the wonders of the natural world around us. Clear, accessible format, charts, diagrams, field tips, practical pointers and historical profiles.