The Nixon Defense

In The Nixon Defense, former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, a wealth of Nixon’s secretly recorded information, and ...

The Nixon Defense

Based on Nixon’s overlooked recordings, New York Times bestselling author John W. Dean connects the dots between what we’ve come to believe about Watergate and what actually happened Watergate forever changed American politics, and in light of the revelations about the NSA’s widespread surveillance program, the scandal has taken on new significance. Yet remarkably, four decades after Nixon was forced to resign, no one has told the full story of his involvement in Watergate. In The Nixon Defense, former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, a wealth of Nixon’s secretly recorded information, and more than 150,000 pages of documents in the National Archives and the Nixon Library to provide the definitive answer to the question: What did President Nixon know and when did he know it? Through narrative and contemporaneous dialogue, Dean connects dots that have never been connected, including revealing how and why the Watergate break-in occurred, what was on the mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap in Nixon’s recorded conversations, and more. In what will stand as the most authoritative account of one of America’s worst political scandals, The Nixon Defense shows how the disastrous mistakes of Watergate could have been avoided and offers a cautionary tale for our own time.

The Nixon Defense

Yet remarkably, four decades after Nixon was forced to resign, no one has told the full story of his involvement in Watergate.

The Nixon Defense


The Nixon Defense Deluxe

Based on Nixon’s overlooked recordings, New York Times bestselling author John W. Dean connects the dots between what we’ve come to believe about Watergate and what actually happened This deluxe edition of The Nixon Defense includes 30 ...

The Nixon Defense Deluxe

Based on Nixon’s overlooked recordings, New York Times bestselling author John W. Dean connects the dots between what we’ve come to believe about Watergate and what actually happened This deluxe edition of The Nixon Defense includes 30 select recordings and transcriptions of secretly recorded conversations between Richard Nixon and his aides in the months after the Watergate break-in, including the three “smoking-gun” conversations of June 23, 1972. Many of these tapes have never been transcribed, giving us an unprecedented view of the origins of the president’s Watergate defense and the workings of the Nixon White House. Watergate forever changed American politics, and in light of the revelations about the NSA’s widespread surveillance program, the scandal has taken on new significance. Yet remarkably, four decades after Nixon was forced to resign, no one has told the full story of his involvement in Watergate. In The Nixon Defense, former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, a wealth of Nixon’s secretly recorded information, and more than 150,000 pages of documents in the National Archives and the Nixon Library to provide the definitive answer to the question: What did President Nixon know and when did he know it? Through narrative and contemporaneous dialogue, Dean connects dots that have never been connected, including revealing how and why the Watergate break-in occurred, what was on the mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap in Nixon’s recorded conversations, and more. In what will stand as the most authoritative account of one of America’s worst political scandals, The Nixon Defense shows how the disastrous mistakes of Watergate could have been avoided and offers a cautionary tale for our own time.

Blind Ambition

A six-month New York Times bestseller: “Not only the best Watergate book, but a very good book indeed” (The Sunday Times).

Blind Ambition

A six-month New York Times bestseller: “Not only the best Watergate book, but a very good book indeed” (The Sunday Times). As White House counsel to Richard Nixon, a young John W. Dean was one of the primary players in the Watergate scandal—and ultimately became the government’s key witness in the investigations that ended the Nixon presidency. After the scandal subsided, Dean rebuilt his career, first in business and then as a bestselling author and lecturer. But while the events were still fresh in his mind, he wrote this remarkable memoir about the operations of the Nixon White House and the crisis that led to the president’s resignation. Called “fascinating” by Commentary, which noted that “there can be little doubt of [Dean's] memory or his candor,” Blind Ambition offers an insider’s view of the deceptions and machinations that brought down an administration and changed the American people’s view of politics and power. It also contains Dean’s own unsparing reflections on the personal demons that drove him to participate in the sordid affair. Upon its original publication, Kirkus Reviews hailed it “the flip side of All the President’s Men—a document, a minefield, and prime entertainment.” Today, Dean is a respected and outspoken advocate for transparency and ethics in government, and the bestselling author of such books as The Nixon Defense, Worse Than Watergate, and Conservatives Without Conscience. Here, in Blind Ambition, he “paints a candid picture of the sickening moral bankruptcy which permeated the White House and to which he contributed. His memory of who said what and to whom is astounding” (Foreign Affairs).

Lost Honor

Dean looks at the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, describes the changes in his own life, and speculates on the identity of "Deep Throat"

Lost Honor

Dean looks at the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, describes the changes in his own life, and speculates on the identity of "Deep Throat"

How to Get Rid of a President

John W. Dean, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: Viking, 2014), 36. 4. Ibid., 35–50. 5. Ibid., 56–60. 6. John A. Farrell, Richard Nixon: The Life (New York: Doubleday, 2017), 479. 7. John W. Dean, The Nixon ...

How to Get Rid of a President

A vivid political history of the schemes, plots, maneuvers, and conspiracies that have attempted -- successfully and not -- to remove unwanted presidents To limit executive power, the founding fathers created fixed presidential terms of four years, giving voters regular opportunities to remove their leaders. Even so, Americans have often resorted to more dramatic paths to disempower the chief executive. The American presidency has seen it all, from rejecting a sitting president's renomination bid and undermining their authority in office to the more drastic methods of impeachment, and, most brutal of all, assassination. How to Get Rid of a President showcases the political dark arts in action: a stew of election dramas, national tragedies, and presidential departures mixed with party intrigue, personal betrayal, and backroom shenanigans. This briskly paced, darkly humorous voyage proves that while the pomp and circumstance of presidential elections might draw more attention, the way that presidents are removed teaches us much more about our political order.

The Rehnquist Choice

The explosive, never-before-revealed story of how William Rehnquist became a Supreme Court Justice, told by the man responsible for his candidacy.

The Rehnquist Choice

The explosive, never-before-revealed story of how William Rehnquist became a Supreme Court Justice, told by the man responsible for his candidacy.

Conservatives Without Conscience

On the heels of his national bestseller Worse Than Watergate, John Dean takes a critical look at the current conservative movement In Conservatives Without Conscience, John Dean places the conservative movement's inner circle of leaders in ...

Conservatives Without Conscience

On the heels of his national bestseller Worse Than Watergate, John Dean takes a critical look at the current conservative movement In Conservatives Without Conscience, John Dean places the conservative movement's inner circle of leaders in the Republican Party under scrutiny. Dean finds their policies and mind- set to be fundamentally authoritarian, and as such, a danger to democracy. By examining the legacies of such old-line conservatives as J. Edgar Hoover, Spiro Agnew, and Phyllis Schlafly and of such current figures as Dick Cheney, Newt Gingrich, and leaders of the Religious Right, Dean presents an alarming record of abuses of power. His trenchant analysis of how conservatism has lost its bearings serves as a chilling warning and a stirring inspiration to safeguard constitutional principles.

Being There

certain of his activities prior to Watergate, even if ultimately it meant the betrayal of President Nixon and of the nation. Dean tells his latest version of Watergate in his most recent book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He ...

Being There

Douglas Caddy was the attorney for E. Howard Hunt, one of the key persons involved in both the JFK assassination and Watergate. Being There: Eye Witness to History is his autobiographical account of these events by accidentally being in the right place at the right time or the wrong place at the wrong time. Episodes include being with Lee Harvey Oswald and Guy Banister in New Orleans, investigating the founding of the modern conservative movement and where it went wrong, looking inside the JFK assassination and the Watergate Conspiracy, uncovering JFK's secret son and why he came to fear for his life, analyzing LBJ's murder victims and his rise to the presidency, interpreting the Moody Foundation Scandal, Russia's involvement in Trump's election, and more.

Bringing Down A President

In 2014, he wrote The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It using the latest revelations from the Nixon Tapes. Disbarred from practicing law, Dean became an investment banker and frequent commentator (a “talking head”) on ...

Bringing Down A President

A middle-grade retelling of Richard Nixon's downfall, Bringing Down A President: The Watergate Scandal is an inventive and timely look at one of the biggest scandals to ever rock our nation by Andrea Balis and Elizabeth Levy, featuring graphic novel style illustrations by Tim Foley. Comprised almost completely of primary source quotes (good thing Nixon's recorder was on) and interspersed with contextual narrative, this captivating account of the trials and tribulations of the Nixon Administration has been rendered screenplay style offering an extraordinarily immediate narrative of one of America's most turbulent eras.

Tricky Dick

Dean had been one of key prosecution witnesses, but in his new book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (2014), he reveals a different view of Nixon. He affirms that there was no express intent by Nixon to break the law ...

Tricky Dick

A warts and all biography of the most enduring American politician of the twentieth century. Drawing on his unprecedented access and insight about the 37th president, New York Times–bestselling author Roger Stone and his co-author, award-winning investigative reporter Michael Colapietro, look at the totality of Richard Nixon’s career, utilizing stunning new information either suppressed or unknown by the mainstream media of the time. Stone and his co-author trace Nixon’s meteoric climb, from his first race for the House in 1947, his dogged pursuit of Soviet spy Alger Hiss (classified Russian documents released after the fall of the Soviet Union prove Hiss was indeed a KGB Spy), to Nixon’s bruising campaign for the US Senate in 1950, his improbable selection by General Dwight D. Eisenhower to be vice president only six years after his election to Congress, the triumphs and humiliations of his vice presidential years, and his razor thin loss of the presidency to John F. Kennedy in 1960. Tricky Dick proves in intricate detail how the 1960 election was stolen from a surging Nixon, detailing voter fraud in both Texas and Illinois to a degree heretofore undocumented by political scientists and covered only by the New York Herald Tribune at the time. These New York Times–bestselling authors also detail Nixon’s reinvention of himself as “the New Nixon” and the greatest single comeback in American history, culminating with Nixon’s triumphant election as president in 1968. Tricky Dick also dissects the military industrial complex unhappiness with Nixon’s end to the war in Vietnam, his historic strategic arms limitation agreement with the Soviets, his opening to China, and the resultant plot to bring Nixon down in the scandal known today as Watergate. “I knew Nixon in the late 80’s. I met him in George Steinbrenner’s box at Yankee Stadium. Roger Stone nails it. He really understands Nixon.” —Donald J. Trump, 45th President of the United States

Worse Than Watergate

John Dean knows what happens behind closed doors at the White House.

Worse Than Watergate

John Dean knows what happens behind closed doors at the White House. As counsel to President Richard Nixon, he witnessed the malignant influence of excessive secrecy and its corruption of good intentions. Now this true insider presents a stunning indictment of George W. Bush's administration. With overwhelming evidence, he shows how the obsessive secrecy and hidden agenda of President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney have resulted in undemocratic-and dangerous-policies for the nation. Dean reveals, among other facts, even criminal offenses: * How the Bush administration deceived Congress into granting it the authorization to go to war against Iraq-a betrayal that is a breach of faith and a constitutional crime * How Bush issued an executive order that sealed presidential papers indefinitely-a fiat that defies Congress and hides information that the public has a right to know * How the White House ordered the EPA to issue assurances that the air quality around Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks was safe-a cynical, political ploy that ignored the dangerous asbestos levels in the area * How a senior administration official leaked that Ambassador Joe Wilson's wife was a covert CIA agent-an egregious violation of national security that borders on treason.

Unmasking Deep Throat

Speculates on the true identity of the person who informed the U.S. press of misconduct during Richard Nixon's presidency; thus initiating President Nixon's eventual resignation from office.

Unmasking Deep Throat

Speculates on the true identity of the person who informed the U.S. press of misconduct during Richard Nixon's presidency; thus initiating President Nixon's eventual resignation from office.

The Nixon Presidency

Bu anan, Patri J. Nixon's White House Wars: The Battles that Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever. ... Dean, John W. The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It. New York: Viking, 2014. Denevi, Timothy.

The Nixon Presidency

The Nixon Presidency is a concise and accessible survey of domestic policy, foreign affairs, and politics during the thirty-seventh president’s time in office. Richard Nixon was the most polarizing president of the twentieth century and one who continues to fascinate observers of American political life. Admirers saw him as the personification of the American dream of upward mobility and their ally against threats at home and abroad. Detractors considered him a deceitful, sinister figure who threatened democracy, was wrapped up in Watergate, and perpetuated an immoral war in Vietnam. As time passes, new questions and insights into the Nixon era arise and various phenomena, such as the expansion of the welfare state, the growth of the administrative state, the evolution of the Republican and Democratic Parties, and the deepening polarization in politics and the broader society, cast Nixon’s presidency in a new light. This book uses Nixon as a prism through which to view American history at home and abroad and shows how Nixon’s influence remains evident half a century after he left office. The text is supported by primary source documents, which makes it ripe for classroom use and key for students of American history, the American presidency, and the sixties.

Henry Kissinger

John W. Dean, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: Viking, 2014), p. 8. 3. Spoken by Nixon at a news conference on August 29, 1973, and widely reported in the press. 4. In fairness to Nixon, he did not ...

Henry Kissinger

Henry Kissinger: Pragmatic Statesman in Hostile Times explores the influence of statesman Henry Kissinger in American foreign relations and national security during 1969 to 1977. Henry Kissinger arrived in the U.S. as a young Jewish refugee and went on to serve as National Security Advisor and Secretary of State to Presidents Nixon and Ford. The consulting firm he founded has advised every U.S. president since. In this book, Abraham R. Wagner reveals how Kissinger used his knowledge of history and international relations to advocate a realpolitik approach to U.S. foreign policy. Through seven selected primary source documents, Wagner tracks how Kissinger became an iconic figure in international relations that polarized opinion during 1969 to 1977, a critical and controversial period of American history. This book will be useful for students interested in American history and security studies, especially those with an interest in U.S. international relations during the latter years of the war in Vietnam.

The Long Reach of the Sixties

“He is Jewish, and, I guess, his appointment is a possibility as he was a very early supporter of Mr. Nixon even when ... who refused to tell a grand jury what she knew about the plan of Philip Berrigan and other antiwar activists to ...

The Long Reach of the Sixties

The Warren Court of the 1950s and 1960s was the most liberal in American history. Yet within a few short years, new appointments redirected the Court in a more conservative direction, a trend that continued for decades. However, even after Warren retired and the makeup of the court changed, his Court cast a shadow that extends to our own era. In The Long Reach of the Sixties, Laura Kalman focuses on the late 1960s and early 1970s, when Presidents Johnson and Nixon attempted to dominate the Court and alter its course. Using newly released--and consistently entertaining--recordings of Lyndon Johnson's and Richard Nixon's telephone conversations, she roots their efforts to mold the Court in their desire to protect their Presidencies. The fierce ideological battles--between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches--that ensued transformed the meaning of the Warren Court in American memory. Despite the fact that the Court's decisions generally reflected public opinion, the surrounding debate calcified the image of the Warren Court as activist and liberal. Abe Fortas's embarrassing fall and Nixon's campaign against liberal justices helped make the term "activist Warren Court" totemic for liberals and conservatives alike. The fear of a liberal court has changed the appointment process forever, Kalman argues. Drawing from sources in the Ford, Reagan, Bush I, and Clinton presidential libraries, as well as the justices' papers, she shows how the desire to avoid another Warren Court has politicized appointments by an order of magnitude. Among other things, presidents now almost never nominate politicians as Supreme Court justices (another response to Warren, who had been the governor of California). Sophisticated, lively, and attuned to the ironies of history, The Long Reach of the Sixties is essential reading for all students of the modern Court and U.S. political history.

Watergate

82 “I am helping the president stop some leaks”: John W. Dean, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: Viking, 2014), 662. 82 “A mood of manic resolve”: Krogh, Integrity, 41. 83 Krogh and Young, ...

Watergate

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * “Do we need still another Watergate book? The answer turns out to be yes—this one.” —The Washington Post * “Dazzling.” —The New York Times Book Review From the New York Times bestselling author of The Only Plane in the Sky, comes the first definitive narrative history of Watergate—“the best and fullest account of the crisis, one unlikely to be surpassed anytime soon” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)—exploring the full scope of the scandal through the politicians, investigators, journalists, and informants who made it the most influential political event of the modern era. In the early hours of June 17, 1972, a security guard named Frank Wills enters six words into the log book of the Watergate office complex that will change the course of history: 1:47 AM Found tape on doors; call police. The subsequent arrests of five men seeking to bug and burgle the Democratic National Committee offices—three of them Cuban exiles, two of them former intelligence operatives—quickly unravels a web of scandal that ultimately ends a presidency and forever alters views of moral authority and leadership. Watergate, as the event is called, becomes a shorthand for corruption, deceit, and unanswered questions. Now, award-winning journalist and bestselling author Garrett M. Graff explores the full scope of this unprecedented moment from start to finish, in the first comprehensive, single-volume account in decades. The story begins in 1971, with the publication of thousands of military and government documents known as the Pentagon Papers, which reveal dishonesty about the decades-long American presence in Vietnam and spark public outrage. Furious that the leak might expose his administration’s own duplicity during a crucial reelection season, President Richard M. Nixon gathers his closest advisors and gives them implicit instructions: Win by any means necessary. Within a few months, an unsteady line of political dominoes are positioned, from the creation of a series of covert operations code-named GEMSTONE to campaign-trail dirty tricks, possible hostage situations, and questionable fundraising efforts—much of it caught on the White House’s own taping system. One by one they fall, until the thwarted June burglary attracts the attention of intrepid journalists, congressional investigators, and embattled intelligence officers, one of whom will spend decades concealing his identity behind the alias “Deep Throat.” As each faction slowly begins to uncover the truth, a conspiracy deeper and more corrupt than anyone thought possible emerges, and the nation is thrown into a state of crisis as its government—and its leader—unravels. Using newly public documents, transcripts, and revelations, Graff recounts every twist with remarkable detail and page-turning drama, bringing readers into the backrooms of Washington, chaotic daily newsrooms, crowded Senate hearings, and even the Oval Office itself during one of the darkest chapters in American history. Grippingly told and meticulously researched, Watergate is the defining account of the moment that has haunted our nation’s past—and still holds the power to shape its present and future.

When Life Strikes the President

This description of Nixon's visit to the Lincoln Memorial and his discussions with students comes from a variety of ... See Dean's detailed and personal account in his book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: ...

When Life Strikes the President

What happens when life, so to speak, strikes the President of the United States? How do presidents and their families cope with illness, personal loss, and scandal, and how have such personal crises affected a president's ability to lead, shaped presidential decision-making in critical moments, and perhaps even altered the course of events? In asking such questions, the essays in this volume -- written by twelve leading scholars noted for their expertise on their respective subjects -- reveal alternately the frailty, the humanity, and the strength of character of some of America's most controversial presidents. Three of them deal with the death of children--the impact of the loss of a young son on Franklin Pierce, Abraham Lincoln, and Calvin Coolidge. Another shows how, when his father suffered a stroke, John F. Kennedy lost his most important adviser as the crisis in Cuba loomed. Three essays tell stories about notorious, self-inflicted scandals during the presidencies of Andrew Jackson, Richard Nixon, and Bill Clinton. Several of them focus on the effects of disability or illness in the Oval Office -- on Woodrow Wilson's stroke at the end of World War I; Franklin Roosevelt's paralysis while leading the country through the Great Depression and World War II; Ronald Reagan's struggles and changed priorities in the wake of an assassination attempt; and the bearing of depression and personality disorders of one kind or another on the actions Jackson, John Tyler, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon during their crucial years in office. While illuminating a considerable span of American history and providing new and significant analyses of American politics and foreign policy, these fascinating essays remind us about the personal side of presidential leadership, and that tomorrow is promised to no one.

The Politics of Presidential Impeachment

John W. Dean, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: Viking, 2014). 25. See the full text of “Louis Patrick Gray III: Hearings, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session, on Nomination of Louis Patrick Gray III, ...

The Politics of Presidential Impeachment

Argues that impeachment may no longer be an effective check on overreach by American presidents. The Politics of Presidential Impeachment takes a distinctive and fresh look at the impeachment provision of the US Constitution. Instead of studying it from a legal-constitutional perspective, the authors use a social science approach incorporating extensive case studies and quantitative analysis. Focusing on four presidents who faced impeachment processes—Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton—they examine the conditions under which presidential impeachment is likely to occur and argue that partisanship and the evolving relationship between Congress and the president determine its effectiveness as an institutional constraint. They find that, in our contemporary political context, the propensity of Congress to utilize the impeachment tool is more likely, but given the state of heightened partisanship, impeachment is less likely to result in removal of a president. The authors conclude that impeachment is no longer a credible threat and thus no longer an effective tool in the arsenal of checks and balances. The book also offers a postscript that discusses the impeachment of President Donald J. Trump. Daniel P. Franklin is Associate Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Georgia State University and author of Pitiful Giants: Presidents in Their Final Terms. Stanley M. Caress (1951–2016) was Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of West Georgia and coauthor (with Todd T. Kunioka) of Term Limits and Their Consequences: The Aftermath of Legislative Reform, also published by SUNY Press. Robert M. Sanders is Professor of Political Science at the University of West Georgia. Cole D. Taratoot received his PhD in political science from Georgia State University.

The Rise of the Latino Vote

Bea L. Hines and Arnold Markowitz, “Cubans Support Nixon's War Stand as Dissenters Pop Balloons into Bay,” Miami Herald, ... Quoted in John W. Dean, Te Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It (New York: Viking, 2014), 7, 24, 28.

The Rise of the Latino Vote

Francis-Fallon returns to the origins of the U.S. “Spanish-speaking vote” to understand the history and potential of this political bloc. He finds that individual voters affiliate more with their particular ethnic communities than with the pan-ethnic Latino identity created for them, complicating the notion of a broader Latino constituency.