Hebrew Bible Old Testament III From Modernism to Post Modernism

Both tried, each one in his own way, to read the Bible “like any other book”. The
first writer is, from a modern point of view, very traditional.42 But even if there are
very few instances in which he reveals his scholarly erudition and very mild ...

Hebrew Bible   Old Testament  III  From Modernism to Post Modernism

The long and complex history of reception and interpretation of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament through the ages, described in the HBOT Project, is in the penultimate part volume III/1 pursued to the nineteenth century’s special situation with its new methods and problems. Due to an increased historical knowledge in many fields and an expanding cultural context, the phenomenon of ‘history’ became the object of an as yet unsurpassed fascination; ‘history’ was the new key concept – partly in form of a ‘historicism’. With regard to biblical studies in general and the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament in particular a decisive historical-critical approach came into focus, which generated tension between this new method and the traditional scriptural interpretation of the Church – and in turn also relatively severe controversies between opposing fronts.

Three Views on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament

But the righteousness that is by faith says: “Do not say in your heart [see Deut 9:4
LXX], 'Who will ascend into heaven? ... interpretation which can only be
described, from the modern point of view, as a drastic and unwarrantable
allegorizing.

Three Views on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament

To read the New Testament is to meet the Old Testament at every turn. But exactly how do Old Testament texts relate to their New Testament references and allusions? Moreover, what fruitful interpretive methods do New Testament texts demonstrate? Leading biblical scholars Walter Kaiser, Darrel Bock and Peter Enns each present their answers to questions surrounding the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament. Contributors address elements such as Divine and human authorial intent, the context of Old Testament references, and theological grounds for an interpretive method. Each author applies his framework to specific texts so that readers can see how their methods work out in practice. Each contributor also receives a thorough critique from the other two authors. A one-stop reference for setting the scene and presenting approaches to the topic that respect the biblical text, Three Views on the New Testament Use of Old Testament gives readers the tools they need to develop their own views on this important subject. The Counterpoints series provides a forum for comparison and critique of different views on issues important to Christians. Counterpoints books address two categories: Church Life and Bible & Theology. Complete your library with other books in the Counterpoints series.

Families in the New Testament World

Greco-Roman marriage also involved an older man having sex with a bride
twelve years old, from a modern point of view just as sick as pederasty.64 Sexual
relations between equal partners is a modern ideal, not an ancient one. Few if
any ...

Families in the New Testament World

What was the family like for the first Christians? Informed by archaeological work and illustrated by figures, this work is a remarkable window into the past, one that both informs and illuminates our current condition. The Family, Culture, and Religion series offers informed and responsible analyses of the state of the American family from a religious perspective and provides practical assistance for the family's revitalization.

Modern Study of the Old Testament and Inspiration

Yet other minds, abandoning the theological point of view, see in these
inequalities simply the outcome of the brute struggle for existence. Quite other is
the Biblical interpretation. It is that the man or nation of high endowment is
endowed not ...

Modern Study of the Old Testament and Inspiration

This 1909 volume explores the development of Old Testament criticism, particularly the relationship between critical insight and divine inspiration.

We Have Heard That God Is with You

Seen from the perspective of proclamation and kerygma, we can hear in a
particular text more than it says “literally,” in a ... For them the method of the New
Testament differs therefore from a modern approach.21 From that point of view
the ...

We Have Heard That God Is with You

Chapters 1 through 7 provide a consideration of classical hermeneutical models. Chapters 8 through 11 include the biblical-theological and hermeneutical background and ingredients of Bos's creative model. Chapters 12 through 15 are an elaboration of this new model. Finally, Chapter 16 employs the model to consider Exodus 3, the songs of the servant of the LORD in Deutero-Isaiah, and Psalm 22.

Introduction to the Old Testament

Applying Norman Gottwald's thesis on Israel's origins, Cereski argues that Israel was formed through a process of social revolution, inspired by the memory of runaway slaves and their worship of a God whose cult mandated radical social ...

Introduction to the Old Testament

Applying Norman Gottwald's thesis on Israel's origins, Cereski argues that Israel was formed through a process of social revolution, inspired by the memory of runaway slaves and their worship of a God whose cult mandated radical social equality and justice.

The Modern Preacher and the Ancient Text

Recovery of the Vision Even in a critical or post-critical age, a valid requirement
of the her- meneutical circle is that, in the ... Claus Westermann exhibits this
perspective when he writes: "The Old Testament tells a story' (von Rad); but the
story ...

The Modern Preacher and the Ancient Text

A fusion of biblical hermeneutics and homiletics, this thorough and well-researched book offers a holistic contemporary approach to the interpretation and preaching of biblical texts, using all the scholarly tools available and focusing especially on literary features. Greidanus develops hermeneutical and homiletical principles and then applies them to four specific genres: Hebrew narratives, prophetic literature, the Gospels, and the Epistles.

Hebrew Bible Old Testament III From Modernism to Post Modernism Part II The Twentieth Century From Modernism to Post Modernism

With this second part of volume III of Hebrew Bible / Old Testament: the History of
Its Interpretation (HBOT), devoted to the relevant ... the handbooks of modern Old
Testament study history presented by Herbert F. Hahn in America (Old Testament
in Modern Research, ... extent biblical scholars may be reflecting over their own
position − not least in the perspective of what past generations have achieved.

Hebrew Bible   Old Testament  III  From Modernism to Post Modernism  Part II  The Twentieth Century   From Modernism to Post Modernism

Volume III, Part 2 of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament-Project!

Hebrew Bible Old Testament III From Modernism to Post Modernism

With this second part of volume III of Hebrew Bible / Old Testament: the History of
Its Interpretation (HBOT), devoted to the relevant ... of biblical research with
special regard to the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament were the handbooks of
modern Old Testament study ... some extent biblical scholars may be reflecting
over their own position − not least in the perspective of what past generations
have achieved.

Hebrew Bible   Old Testament  III  From Modernism to Post Modernism

The long and complex history of reception and interpretation of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament through the ages, described in the HBOT Project, focuses in this concluding volume III, Part 2 on the multifarious research and the different methods used in the last century. Even this volume is written by Christion and Jewish scholars and takes its wider cultural and philosophical context into consideration. The perspective is worldwide and ecumenical. Its references to modern biblical scholarship, on which it is based, are extensive and updated. The indexes (names, topics, references to biblical sources and a broad body of literature beyond) are the key to the wealth of information provided. Contributors are J. Barton, H.L. Bosman, A.F. Campbell, SJ, D.M. Carr, D.J.A. Clines, W. Dietrich, St.E. Fassberg, D. Føllesdal, A.C. Hagedorn, K.M. Heim, J. Høgenhaven, B. Janowski, D.A. Knight, C. Körting, A. Laato, P. Machinist, M.A.O ́Brien, M. Oeming, D. Olson, E. Otto, M. Sæbø, J. Schaper, S. Sekine, J.L. Ska, SJ, M.A. Sweeney, and J. de Waard.

The Complete Literary Guide to the Bible

The Old Testament, for example, is a collection of writings radically distanced
from modern readers by a gap of time and ... involving everything from narrative
point of view, procedures of description and characterization, the management of
 ...

The Complete Literary Guide to the Bible

The EditorsLeland Ryken Wheaton College (Illinois) Tremper Longman III Westminster Theological Seminary The Authors Fredrick Buechner Novelist John Sailhamer Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Wilson G. Baroody (deceased) Arizona State UniversityWilliam F. Gentrup Arizona State UniversityKenneth R.R. Gros Louis Indiana University Willard Van Antwerpen Indiana University Nancy Tischler The Pennsylvania State University V. Philips Long Covenant Theological Seminary Michael Hagan North American Baptist Seminary Richard L. Pratt, Jr. Reformed Theological Seminary Douglas Green Yale University Wilma McClarty Southern College Jerry A. Gladson First Christian Church, Garden Grove, California Raymond C. Van Leeouwen Calvin Theological Seminary G. Lloyd Carr Gordon College Richard Patterson Liberty University James H. Sims The University of Southern Mississippi Branson L. Woodard, Jr. Liberty University Amberys R. Whittle Georgia Southern University John H. Augustine Yale University Michael Travers Grand Rapids Baptist College Marianne Meye Thompson Fuller Theological Seminary John W. Sider Westmont College Carey C. Newman Palm Beach Atlantic CollegeWilliam G. Doty The University of Alabama/Tuscaloosa Chaim Potak Novelist Gene Warren Doty University of Missouri-Rolla Sidney Greidanus Calvin Theological Seminary

Four Views on Moving beyond the Bible to Theology

From a hermeneutical point of view, progressive revelation became a slogan for
the arbitrary and inconsistent process of ... These four are dependent in part on
James Barr, The bible in the Modern World (New York: Harper & Row, 1973), 145
, ...

Four Views on Moving beyond the Bible to Theology

The Bible has long served as the standard for Christian practice, yet believers still disagree on how biblical passages should be interpreted and applied. Only when readers fully understand the constructs that inform their process of moving from Scripture to theology—and those of others—can Christians fully evaluate teachings that claim to be “biblical.” Here, scholars who affirm an inspired Bible, relevant and authoritative for every era, present models they consider most faithful to Scripture: - Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.: A Principlizing Model - Daniel M. Doriani: A Redemptive-Historical Model - Kevin J. Vanhoozer: A Drama-of-Redemption Model - William J. Webb: A Redemptive-Movement Model Each position also receives critiques from the proponents of the other views. Moreover, due to the far-reaching implications this topic holds for biblical studies, theology, and church teaching, this book includes three additional reflections by Christopher J. H. Wright, Mark L. Strauss, and Al Wolters on the theological and practical interpretation of biblical texts. Four Views on Moving beyond the Bible to Theology empowers readers to identify, evaluate, and refine their own approach to moving from the Bible to theology.

Isaiah Through the Ages

The reader will find their view of the Old Testament to be entirely Christocentric in
line with the early Church's task to ... for optional reading , with the sections
clearly marked , as well as to present the modern point of view for comparison .

Isaiah Through the Ages

A compilation of previously unavailable translated commentaries by the Church Fathers on the book of Isaiah. Fourth and fifth-century exegetes are featured especially, but there are many excerpts from Sts. Justin Maryr, Irenaeus, Athanasius of Alexandria, Jerome, Ambrose and others. Modern commentary (from 1775 to the present) has been added to enhance our understanding by providing insight into the historical context, poetry and structure. In some chapters, a short Judaic section has been included to point to Messianic passages and assist with some obscure metaphors and references.

Early Judaism and Modern Culture

... the whole Bible or parts of its various canons from a systematic- theological
point of view. Biblical Theology as a discipline has been differentiated into Old
Testament and New Testament theology only since the nineteenth century. Until
then ...

Early Judaism and Modern Culture

Gerbern Oegema has long been drawn to the noncanonical literature of early Judaism literature written during the time between the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament (300 b.c.e. 200 c.e.). These works, many of which have been lost, forgotten, and rediscovered, are now being studied with ever-increasing enthusiasm by scholars and students alike. Although much recent attention has been given to the literary and historical merits of the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and other deutero- and extracanonical writings, Early Judaism and Modern Culture shows that it is also important to study these literary works from a theological perspective. To that end, Oegema considers the reception of early Jewish writings throughout history and identifies their theological contributions to many issues of perennial importance: ethics, politics, gender relations, interreligious dialogue, and more. Oegema demonstrates decisively that these books more than merely objects of academic curiosity have real theological and cultural relevance for churches, synagogues, and society at large today. Through engaging words, Gerbern Oegema invites his readers to appreciate the vibrant and advanced world of the early Jews and how they have left us insights and visions for modern culture. James H. Charlesworth Princeton Theological Seminary In an era when biblical theology is commonly approached from a narrow canonical perspective, Oegema s demonstration of the theological and historical significance of the noncanonical writings of ancient Judaism is refreshing and important. John J. Collins Yale Divinity School

Canon and Modern Bible Translation in Interconfessional Perspective

So the vision is essentially the same : the Laodicean canon is just the contents of
the Hebrew Bible while Christian Scripture ... From both the Catholic and
Protestant point of view it is common to refer to Scripture and tradition as two
separate ...

Canon and Modern Bible Translation in Interconfessional Perspective


An Introduction to the New Testament Second Edition

The historical methods of criticism enable us to view the NT books as intricate
works with ingenious literary patterns and highly ... Three points on modern
biblical research are derived from Hayes and Holladay, Biblical Exegesis 116–17
.

An Introduction to the New Testament  Second Edition

Studying the New Testament requires a determination to encounter this collection of writings on its own terms. This classic introduction by Charles B. Puskas, revised with C. Michael Robbins, provides helpful guidance. Since the publication of the first edition, which was in print for twenty years, a host of new and diverse cultural, historical, social-scientific, socio-rhetorical, narrative, textual, and contextual studies has been examined. Attentive also to the positive reviews of the first edition, the authors retain the original tripartite arrangement on 1) the world of the New Testament, 2) interpreting the New Testament, and 3) Jesus and early Christianity. This volume supplies readers with pertinent primary and secondary material. The new edition carries on a genuine effort to be nonsectarian, and although it is more of a critical introduction than a general survey, it is recommended to midlevel college and seminary students and to anyone who wants to be better informed about the New Testament.

The Bible Jesus Read

Basketball bad-boy Dennis Rodman expresses the modern point of view: "If there
is a supreme being, he/she/it has a hell of a lot more to worry about than my
stupid problems." Actually, much of the Old Testament is devoted to overcoming
that ...

The Bible Jesus Read

Philip Yancey has a way of confronting our most cherished--but misguided--notions about the Christian life. In The Bible Jesus Read, Yancey challenges the perception that the New Testament is more important than the Old, that the Hebrew Scriptures aren't worth the time they take to read and understand them. Writing as always with keen insight into the human condition and God’s provision for it, Yancey debunks this theory once and for all. Yes, he agrees, the Old Testament can be baffling, boring, and even offensive to the modern reader. But as he personally discovered, the Old Testament is full of rewards for the one who embraces its riches. With his candid, signature style, Yancey unfolds his interactions with the Old Testament from the perspective of his own deeply personal journey. From Moses, the amazing prince of Egypt, to the psalmists' turbulent emotions and the prophets' oddball rantings, Yancey paints a picture of Israel's God--and ours--that fills in the blanks of a solely New Testament vision of the Almighty. As he reconnects for us the strong, sinuous chords that bind the Old and New Testaments, Yancey reclaims the Reformers' deep sense of unity between the two. Most important, he says, reading the Scriptures that Jesus so revered gives believers a profound new understanding of Christ, the Cornerstone of the new covenant. "The more we comprehend the Old Testament," Yancey writes, "the more we comprehend Jesus."

The Christian View of the Old Testament

CHAPTER III The Oid Testament and Modern Cbiticism No careful observer can
doubt that modern criticism has exerted a marked influence upon the attitude of
many Christian people toward the Bible, Both those in sympathy with new ideas ...

The Christian View of the Old Testament

After a close study of the Genesis narrative and the numerous attempts of harmonizing it with science, the present writer has become thoroughly convinced that it is impossible to establish a complete, detailed harmony between the Genesis account of creation and the established facts of science without doing violence to the Bible or science or both. -from "Chapter II: The Old Testament and Modern Science" With a up-to-the minute modernity refreshing in a book almost a century old, this 1912 gingerly walks the precarious line between acknowledging the achievements of science and recognizing the wisdom and comfort accorded by religious faith. Examining more than just the centuries-long clash between faith and reason, Biblical scholar Frederick Carl Eiselen, a voice almost forgotten today, discusses how and why the Old Testament holds its own against modern criticism, contemporary archaeology, and comparative mythology to remain of concrete significance for today's Christians. A brave and insightful work at the turn of the 20th-century, it remains an even braver one at the turn of the 21st. OF INTEREST TO: religious philosophers, students of 20th-century Christianity, readers of culture-war issues American author FREDERICK CARL EISELEN (1872-1937) also wrote Prophecy and the Prophets in Their Historical Relations (1909), Books of the Pentateuch: Their Origin, Contents, and Significance (1916), and Psalms and Other Sacred Writings: Their Origin, Contents, and Significance (1918).