The Opening of the Way

A Practical Guide to the Wisdom Teachings of Ancient Egypt

The Opening of the Way

Here, the author of the two Her-Bak novels provides specific tools that instruct in the comprehension and application of those teachings, and help us recognize that it is by the path of silence and meditation that we are guided to the intelligence of the heart, which is our key to self-mastery and our connection to higher consciousness.

The Opening of Heauen Gates, Or The Ready Way to Euerlasting Life. Deliured in a Most Familiar Dialogue, Between Reason and Religion, Touching Prædestination, Gods-word and Mans Free-will, to the Vnderstanding of the Weakest Capacitie and Confirming of the More Strong. The Fourth Edition. [With “A Prayer Taken Out of the Fountaine of Holy Scripture, Very Comfortable for Euery Perticular Person.”]

The Opening of Heauen Gates, Or The Ready Way to Euerlasting Life. Deliured in a Most Familiar Dialogue, Between Reason and Religion, Touching Prædestination, Gods-word and Mans Free-will, to the Vnderstanding of the Weakest Capacitie and Confirming of the More Strong. The Fourth Edition. [With “A Prayer Taken Out of the Fountaine of Holy Scripture, Very Comfortable for Euery Perticular Person.”]


The Opening of Hegel's Logic

From Being to Infinity

The Opening of Hegel's Logic

Hegel is one of the most important modern philosophers, whose thought influenced the development of existentialism, Marxism, pragmatism, hermeneutics, and deconstruction. Yet Hegel's central text, the monumental Science of Logic, still remains for most philosophers (both figuratively and literally) a firmly closed book. The purpose of The Opening of Hegel's Logic is to dispel the myths that surround the Logic and to show that Hegel's unjustly neglected text is a work of extraordinary subtlety and insight. Part One of The Opening of Hegel's Logic argues that the Logic provides a rigorous derivation of the fundamental categories of thought and contrasts Hegel's approach to the categories with that of Kant. It goes on to examine the historical and linguistic presuppositions of Hegel's self-critical, "presuppositionless" logic and, in the process, considers several signifi-cant criticisms of such logic advanced by Schelling, Feuerbach, Gadamer, and Kierkegaard. Separate chapters are devoted to the relation between logic and ontology in Hegel's Logic and to the relation between the Logic itself and the Phenomenology. Part Two contains the text - in German and English - of the first two chapters of Hegel's Logic, which cover such categories as being, becoming, something, limit, finitude, and infinity. Part Three then provides a clear and accessible commentary on these two chapters that both examines Hegel's arguments in detail and relates his insights to those of other philosophers, such as Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, Nietzsche, and Levinas. The Opening of Hegel's Logic aims to help students and scholars read Hegel's often formidably difficult text for themselves and discover the wealth of philosophical riches that it contains. It also argues that Hegel's project of a presuppositionless science of logic is one that deserves serious consideration today.

Jedediah Smith and the Opening of the West

Jedediah Smith and the Opening of the West

In 1822, before Jedediah Smith entered the West, it was largely an unknown land, “a wilderness,” he wrote, “of two thousand miles diameter.” During his nine years as a trapper for Ashley and Henry and later for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, “the mild and Christian young man” blazed the trail westward through South Pass; he was the first to go from the Missouri overland to California, the first to cross the length of Utah and the width of Nevada, first to travel by land up through California and Oregon, first to cross the Sierra Nevada. Before his death on the Santa Fe Trail at the hands of the Comanches, Jed Smith and his partners had drawn the map of the west on a beaver skin.

The Opening of a New Landscape

Columbia Glacier at Mid-Retreat

The Opening of a New Landscape

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Special Publications Series. This book, beautifully illustrated with dozens of extraordinary photographs, not only tells the history of the expeditions to explore the Columbia Glacier, but also shows how warming over the last century in combination with internal physics of the glacier act to produce dramatic and unpredictable responses to climate change. In a giant transformation, not only are we losing an enormous storehouse of fresh water, but we also bear witness to the opening up of a new landscape as more and more of the land surface formerly covered by ice and snow becomes exposed to sunlight and so welcomes new communities of flora and fauna. More than just a science story, this is a fascinating picture of how science and scientists work, of how science is carried out and advances. One of the world's leading experts on the Columbia Glacier, W. Tad Pfeffer, scientist, writer, and photographer, is uniquely qualified to have written this absorbing and dynamic testament to this wonder of nature.

Introductory Lecture delivered at the Opening of the Lancaster Conservatory of the Arts and Sciences, and City Lyceum, on the evening of July 3rd, 1837. By the Rev. C. Fr. Cruse. [Followed by “Constitution of the Lancaster Conservatory of Arts and Sciences, and City Lyceum.”]

Introductory Lecture delivered at the Opening of the Lancaster Conservatory of the Arts and Sciences, and City Lyceum, on the evening of July 3rd, 1837. By the Rev. C. Fr. Cruse. [Followed by “Constitution of the Lancaster Conservatory of Arts and Sciences, and City Lyceum.”]


The Nez Perce Indians and the Opening of the Northwest

The Nez Perce Indians and the Opening of the Northwest

Is there any chapter in American history more dramatic than that of the Northwest from the time of Lewis and Clark to the tragic defeat of Chief Joseph in 1877? Heroic - and not so heroic -characters abound: explorers, fur traders, miners, settlers, missionaries, ranchers, Indian chiefs and their tribespeople. Now, when interest in Lewis and Clark and the American Northwest has never been higher, comes the first complete and unabridged paperback edition of Alvin Josephy's masterwork.

The Brothers Robidoux and the Opening of the American West

The Brothers Robidoux and the Opening of the American West

Written in a unique biographical format, Robert Willoughby interweaves the stories of six brothers who shaped the American trans-Mississippi West during the first five decades of the nineteenth century. After migrating from French Canada to St. Louis, the brothers Robidoux—Joseph, Francois, Antoine, Louis, Michel, and Isadore—and their father, Joseph, became significant members in the business, fur trading, and land speculation communities, frequently interacting with upper-class members of the French society. Upon coming of age, the brothers followed their father into the fur business and American Indian trade. The oldest of the six, Joseph, led the group on an expedition up the Missouri River as Lewis and Clark had once done, designating a path of trade sites along their journey until they reached their destination at present-day Omaha, Nebraska. Eventually the younger brothers set out on their own westward expedition in the mid 1820s, reaching both Colorado and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Joseph eventually became a town founder in northwest Missouri near Blacksnake Creek. Antoine and Louis traveled as far as California, finally settling in Santa Fe where they became prominent citizens. As a trapper and trader, Michel endured many hardships and close calls during his journey across the West. Francois and Isadore made their home in New Mexico, maintaining a close relationship with Joseph in Missouri. Though frequently under contract by others, the brothers did their best work when allowed to freelance and make their own rules. The brothers would ultimately pass on their prosperous legacy of ranging, exploring, trading, and town-building to a new generation of settlers. As the nature of the fur trade changed, so did the brothers’ business model. They began focusing on outfitting western migrants, town folk, and farmers. Their practices made each of them wealthy; however, they all died poor. To understand the opening of the American West, one must first know about men like the brothers Robidoux. Their lives are the framework for stories about the American frontier. By using primary sources located at the Missouri Historical Society, the Mexican Archives of New Mexico, and the Huntington Library, as well as contemporary accounts written by those who knew them, Willoughby has now told the Robidouxs’ story.