The Outlaw Years

The years just before 1880 until about 1885 are considered the "outlaw years," when lawlessness developed a law of its own and planned an empire.

The Outlaw Years

The years just before 1880 until about 1885 are considered the "outlaw years," when lawlessness developed a law of its own and planned an empire. Operating along the Natchez Trace, an overland trading and postal-rider route that in places was barely a trail, the outlaws preyed upon the traffic along this line. Their plans were laid in the dives under the bluffs of the river towns--Natchez and Vicksburg and as far south as New Orleans. By far the bloodiest were the Harpes, who were capable of spectacular murders solely to amuse their comrades. Another gang of outlaws under John Murrell even threatened national stability for a time in his plot to steal slaves and organize insurrection in order to disorganize the government and establish his own state. This conspiracy was discovered and defeated by a store clerk who joined the outlaws and lived several perilous months among them. He was almost hung by Murrell's secret partisans among the "respectable" elements. After the overthrow of the "outlaw empire" in 1885, the scene shifted: the frontier advanced; outlaw violence changed its forms, but it never again reached the terrible and magnificent range of the "outlaw years."

The Outlaw Years

The Outlaw Years


The Outlaw Years

The Outlaw Years


The Outlaw Years the History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

The Outlaw Years  the History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Gangs and the Military

The outlaws of Cave-in-Rock: Historical accounts of the famous highwaymen and river pirates who operated in pioneer days upon the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers ... The outlaw years: The history of the land pirates of the Natchez Trace.

Gangs and the Military

Gangs are expanding, evolving, and posing an increasing threat to communities nationwide. This could be due in part to the increased number of gang members with military training. This book explores how military veterans are becoming increasingly involved in street gangs, outlaw motorcycle gangs, and domestic extremist groups.

The Outlaw Years

The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace Robert Coates. THE OUTLAW YEARS PIONEERS DANIEL BOON came first. He left his home in the Carolinas, in the Yadkin Valley; he came climbing up through the ragged Cumberlands, ...

The Outlaw Years


Western Rivermen 1763 1861

The most famous and widely read book on land piracy is also the least accurate : Robert M. Coates , The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( New York , 1930 ) . Otto A. Rothert's The Outlaws of Cave - In ...

Western Rivermen  1763   1861

Western Rivermen, the first documented sociocultural history of its subject, is a fascinating book. Michael Allen explores the rigorous lives of professional boatmen who plied non-steam vessels—flatboats, keelboats, and rafts—on the Ohio and lower Mississippi rivers from 1763-1861. Allen first considers the mythical “half horse, half alligator” boatmen who were an integral part of the folklore of the time. Americans of the Jacksonian and pre-Civil War period perceived the rivermen as hard-drinking, straight-shooting adventurers on the frontier. Their notions were reinforced by romanticized portrayals of the boatmen in songs, paintings, newspaper humor, and literature. Allen contends that these mythical depictions of the boatmen were a reflection of the yearnings of an industrializing people for what they thought to be a simpler time. Allen demonstrates, however, that the actual lives of the rivermen little resembled their portrayals in popular culture. Drawing on more than eighty firsthand accounts—ranging from a short letter to a four-volume memoir—he provides a rounded view of the boatmen that reveals the lonely, dangerous nature of their profession. He also discusses the social and economic aspects of their lives, such as their cargoes, the river towns they visited, and the impact on their lives of the steamboat and advancing civilization. Allen’s comprehensive, highly informative study sheds new light on a group of men who played an important role in the development of the trans-Appalachian West and the ways in which their lives were transformed into one of the enduring themes of American folk culture.

Guide to the Natchez Trace Parkway

The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace, by Robert M. Coates (Pelican Publishing Company, 2002). First published in 1930, this is a delicious if somewhat old-fashioned biography of some of the Trace's more ...

Guide to the Natchez Trace Parkway

The Best Road Trip Through Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee In the heart of the Deep South, the Natchez Trace Parkway traverses 444 miles from Natchez, Mississippi, to its northern terminus near Nashville, Tennessee. Rolling hills, historic sites, beautiful scenery—the historic byway is peppered with some of the region’s best food, lodging, and attractions. It is a drive that everyone should make. With the Guide to the Natchez Trace Parkway, you can explore parts of the route or its entire length—and you won’t miss any of your favorite discoveries along the way. The nearly 100 possible milepost stops are sorted into categories, so you can choose the places that interest you most. Plus, with information ranging from parkway rules and best safety practices to tips about when to travel, this guidebook is essential in planning the perfect trip for yourself, your friends, or your entire family. Those who wish to experience the terrain on foot, bicycle, or horseback will appreciate the practical advice and details on trail locations. Whether you’re exploring a few miles or a few hundred, maximize your enjoyment with the full-color Guide to the Natchez Trace Parkway. There’s a visual delight at every turn.

The Historical Atlas of American Crime

murder of Eunice Bolles, aged 6 years and 6 months,” 1786. University of Michigan: James V. Medler Crime Collection, William L. Clements Library. Coates, Robert M. The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace.

The Historical Atlas of American Crime

Traces the history of crime and punishment from American Colonial times to present day, listing in alphabetical order the states in which the crimes were committed, who committed them and what the punishment was.

Jefferson Davis Unconquerable Heart

John A. Murel , the Great Western Land Pirate ; ... Plan of Exciting a Negro Rebellion ... ( Athens , Tenn .: George White , 1835 ) ; Robert M. Coates , The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( New York ...

Jefferson Davis  Unconquerable Heart

Preeminent Civil War historian Frank Vandiver always longed to see an interpretive biography of Jefferson Davis. Finally, more than twenty years after Vandiver expressed that wish, publication of Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart makes such an interpretive biography available. Felicity Allen begins this monumental work with Davis's political imprisonment at the end of the Civil War and masterfully flashes back to his earlier life, interweaving Davis's private life as a schoolboy, a Mississippi planter, a husband, a father, and a political leader. She follows him from West Point through army service on the frontier, his election to the U.S. House of Representatives, his regimental command in the Mexican War, his service as U.S. secretary of war and senator, and his term as president of the Confederate States of America. Although Davis's family is the nexus of this biography, friends and enemies also play major roles. Among his friends intimately met in this book are such stellar figures as Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. With the use of contemporary accounts and Davis's own correspondence, Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart casts new light upon this remarkable man, thawing the icy image of Davis in many previous accounts. Felicity Allen shows a strong, yet gentle man; a stern soldier who loved horses, guns, poetry, and children; a master of the English language, with a dry wit; a man of powerful feelings who held them in such tight control that he was considered cold; and a home-loving Mississippian who was drawn into a vortex of national events and eventual catastrophe. At all times, "duty, honor, country" ruled his mind. Davis's Christian view of life runs like a thread throughout the book, binding together his devotion to God, his family, and the land. Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart brings Davis to life in a way that has never been done before. The variety of his experience, the breadth of his learning, and the consistency of his beliefs make this historical figure eminently worth knowing.

Major Fiction of William Gilmore Simms

The History of Virgil A. Stewart , and His Adventure in Capturing and Exposing the Great “ Western Land Pirate ” and His ... 240-46 ; Robert M. Coates , The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( New York ...

Major Fiction of William Gilmore Simms

William Gilmore Simms (1806–1870) was the preeminent southern man of letters in the antebellum period, a prolific, talented writer in many genres and an eloquent intellectual spokesman of r his region. During his long career, he wrote plays, poetry, literary criticism, biography and history; but he is best remembered for his numerous novels and tales. Many Ann Wimsatt provides the first significant full-length evaluation of Simms’s achievement in his long fiction, selected poetry, essays, and short fiction. Wimsatt’s chief emphasis is on the thirty-odd novels that Simms published from the mid-1830s until after the Civil War. In bringing his impressive body of work to life, she makes use of biographical and historical information and also of twentieth-century literary theories of the romance, Simm’s principal genre. Through analyses of such seminal works as Guy Rivers, The Yemassee, The Cassique of Kiawah, and Woodcraft, Wimsatt illuminates Simm’s contributions to the romance tradition—contributions misunderstood by previous critics—and suggests how to view his novels within the light of recent literary criticism. She also demonstrates how Simms used the historical conditions of southern culture as well as events of his own life to flesh out literary patterns, and she analyzes his use of low-country, frontier and mountain settings. Although critics praised Simms early in his career as “the first American novelist of the day,” the panic of 1837 and the changes in the book market that it helped foster severely damaged his prospects for wealth and fame. The financial recession, Wimsatt finds, together with shifts in literary taste, contributed to the decline of Simms’s reputation. Simms attempted to adjust to the changing climate for fiction by incorporating two modes of nineteenth-century realism, the satiric portrayal of southern manners and southern backwoods humor, into the framework of his long romances; but his accomplishments in these areas have been undervalued or misunderstood by critics since is time. Wimsatt’s book is the first to survey Simms’s fiction and much of his other writing against the background of his life and literary career and the first to make extensive use of his immense correspondence. It is an important study of a neglected author who once served as the leafing symbol of literary activity in the South. It fills what has heretofore been a serious gap in southern literary studies.

Explorations Into the World of Lewis and Clark V 3 of 3

He felt so obligated to rectify the myths regarding violence on the Natchez Trace propagated by Robert M. Coates's 1930 best seller, The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace, that he became obsessed with ...

Explorations Into the World of Lewis and Clark V 3 of 3

Volume 3 of 3. This 3-volume anthology of 194 articles (with 102 maps and illustrations) published between 1974 and 1999 in We Proceeded On, The quarterly journal of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. Contributors include Stephen Ambrose, John Logan Allen, Paul Russell Cutright among other professional and amateur Lewis and Clark scholars. Vol. 1 ISBN 1582187614, Vol. 2 ISBN 1582187630 Vol. 3 1582187657.

Explorations Into the World of Lewis and Clark V 3 of 3

He felt so obligated to rectify the myths regarding violence on the Natchez Trace propagated by Robert M. Coates's 1930 best seller, The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace, that he became obsessed with ...

Explorations Into the World of Lewis and Clark V 3 of 3

Volume 3 of 3. This 3-volume anthology of 194 articles (with 102 maps and illustrations) published between 1974 and 1999 in We Proceeded On, The quarterly journal of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation. Contributors include Stephen Ambrose, John Logan Allen, and Paul Russell Cutright among other professional and amateur Lewis and Clark scholars. Vol. 1 ISBN 1582187622, Vol. 2 ISBN 1582187649 Vol. 3 1582187665.

The Old Southwest 1795 1830

A Federal Highway of the Old Southwest , " The Journal of Mississippi History , 1 ( April , 1939 ) , pp . 82-99 . ... Robert M. Coates , The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( New York , 1930 ) , pp .

The Old Southwest  1795 1830

During the early years of the U.S. republic, its vital southwestern quadrant - encompassing the modern-day states between South Carolina and Louisiana - experienced nearly unceasing conflict. In The Old Southwest, 1795-1830: Frontiers in Conflict, historians Thomas D. Clark and John D. W. Guice analyze the many disputes that resulted when the United States pushed aside a hundred thousand Indians and overtook the final vestiges of Spanish, French, and British presence in the wilderness. Leaders such as Andrew Jackson, who emerged during the Creek War, introduced new policies of Indian removal and state making, along with a decided willingness to let adventurous settlers open up the new territories as a part of the Manifest Destiny of a growing country.

Lewis And Clark Road Trips

Penguin Books (2001 ) BORDERLAND IN RETREAT: FROM SPANISH LOUISIANA TO THE FAR SOUTHWEST by Abraham P. Nasitir. ... Coward-McCann, Inc. (1965) THE OUTLAW YEARS: THE HISTORY OF THE LAND PIRATES OF THE NATCHEZ TRACE by Robert M. Coates.

Lewis And Clark Road Trips

A new kind of travel/history guide provides trip planning and travel maps on facing pages and contains more than 800 destinations on the Lewis and Clark Trail with 161 maps and turn-by-turn driving directions. Phone numbers, prices, hours, and Web sites. From Washington, D.C., to the Pacific Coast, the Canadian border to New Orleans. More than 400 photos. More than 400 references. Index. Contains a Key Guide to 573 historic Lewis and Clark campsite locations, cross-referenced to journals.

Cave in Rock Pirates and Outlaws

Coates, Robert M. The Outlaw Years: The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace. New York: Literary Guild of America, 1930. Collins, Lewis. History of Kentucky: Historical Sketches of Kentucky. Covington, KY: Collins & Co., ...

Cave in Rock Pirates and Outlaws

After the American Revolution, countless pioneers floated into the western frontier on the currents of the Ohio River. Inevitably, their journey brought them past Cave-in-Rock, where the region's outlaws waited in perfect and perpetual ambush. For almost half a century, notorious rogues such as the Alstons, the Harpes, the Sturdivants, Samuel Mason, James Ford, John Crenshaw, Logan Belt and Duff the Counterfeiter all operated out of the cave's dark interior. Todd Carr follows the folklore of the horse thieves, pirates and highwaymen clinging to the shadows of the legendary river bluff.

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

It is quite certain that most of Faulkner's knowledge of these men came from Robert M. Coates's The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( 1930 ) , a readable compilation of several mostly nineteenth ...

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

William Gilmore Simms (1807-1870), the antebellum South's foremost author and cultural critic, was the first advocate of regionalism in the creation of national literature. This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

A Tissue of Lies

17 The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace ( New York : Macaulay , 1930 ) , p . 51 . See " Hare , The Outlaw Years ( New York : Macaulay , 1930 ) , pp . 73-105 . 18 1919 The and Robber Bridegroom ...

A Tissue of Lies

A study linking the novels of Eudora Welty to a tradition of Southern romance writers. Beginning with the Civil War diarists, the author isolates and defines the components of the Southern romance, tracing Welty's adaptation of each component within the novels themselves and revealing a twofold importance: it connects the literature of the Civil War diarists to the work of Eudora Welty in a meaningful way while illuminating her work in the light of a Southern Romance tradition.

A Bibliography of Tennessee History 1973 1996

Coates , Robert M. The Outlaw Years : The History of the Land Pirates of the Natchez Trace . Bowie , Md .: Heritage Books , 1991. 314 pp . Corgan , James X. " Preliminary Catalog of the Agricultural and Medical Societies of Antebellum ...

A Bibliography of Tennessee History  1973 1996

With some 6,000 entries, A Bibliography of Tennessee History will prove to be an invaluable resource for anyone--students, historians, librarians, genealogists--engaged in researching Tennessee's rich and colorful past. A sequel to Sam B. Smith's invaluable 1973 work, Tennessee History: A Bibliography, this book follows a similar format and includes published books and essays, as well as many unpublished theses and dissertations, that have become available during the intervening years. The volume begins with sections on Reference, Natural History, and Native Americans. Its divisions then follow the major periods of the state's history: Before Statehood, State Development, Civil War, Late Nineteenth Century, Early Twentieth Century, and Late Twentieth Century. Sections on Literature and County Histories round out the book. Included is a helpful subject index that points the reader to particular persons, places, incidents, or topics. Substantial sections in this index highlight women's history and African American history, two areas in which scholarship has proliferated during the past two decades. The history of entertainment in Tennessee is also well represented in this volume, including, for example, hundreds of citations for writings about Elvis Presley and for works that treat Nashville and Memphis as major show business centers. The Literature section, meanwhile, includes citations for fiction and poetry relating to Tennessee history as well as for critical works about Tennessee writers. Throughout, the editors have strived to achieve a balance between comprehensive coverage and the need to be selective. The result is a volume that will benefit researchers for years to come. The Editors: W. Calvin Dickinson is professor of history at Tennessee Technological University. Eloise R. Hitchcock is head reference librarian at the University of the South.