The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Clough (1819-1861), one of the most undervalued of Victorian writers, is only now being recognized as a major poet.

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Hugh Clough is one of the most undervalued Victorian poets. His importance is now being recognized, and the New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse assigns him his rightful position as a major poet. While an undergraduate at Balliol and a Fellow of Oriel, Clough wrote a series of intenselypersonal diaries, which throw light not only on his own development as a poet, but on the Oxford education of the time and the religious sensibility of the early Victorian era.Having been influenced by Thomas Arnold at Rugby, Clough felt the attraction at Oxford of the charisma of Newman. He was torn between the liberal and the catholic view of Christianity and began to raise the questions which led him eventually to agnosticism. In lighter moments the Diaries showClough boating on the river and walking with Matthew Arnold through the countryside immortalized by The Scholar Gypsy.

Arthur Hugh Clough

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough , edited by A. Kenny , Oxford 1990 . The Letters of Matthew Arnold , edited by Cecil Y. Lang , University Press of Virginia , six volumes 1996-2002 . K L Σ The Correspondence of Arthur Hugh ...

Arthur Hugh Clough

A biography of one of the most enigmatic and colourful Victorians.

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Hugh Clough Anthony Kenny. about the Clough manuscripts , including the journals . He also made transcripts from the diaries which are now in the Honnold library in Claremont College , Pomona . In the judgement of the Oxford ...

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough

Arthur Hugh Clough is one of the most undervalued Victorian poets. His importance is now being recognized, and the New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse assigns him his rightful position as a major poet. While an undergraduate at Balliol and a Fellow of Oriel, Clough wrote a series of intenselypersonal diaries, which throw light not only on his own development as a poet, but on the Oxford education of the time and the religious sensibility of the early Victorian era.Having been influenced by Thomas Arnold at Rugby, Clough felt the attraction at Oxford of the charisma of Newman. He was torn between the liberal and the catholic view of Christianity and began to raise the questions which led him eventually to agnosticism. In lighter moments the Diaries showClough boating on the river and walking with Matthew Arnold through the countryside immortalized by The Scholar Gypsy.

Arthur Hugh Clough

1862 1865 1869 Ambarvalia Arnold CH Correspondence Poems by Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. Blanche Clough (London: Macmillan, ... Frederick L. Mulhauser, 2 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957) The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed.

Arthur Hugh Clough

This volume in the 21st-Century Oxford Authors series offers an authoritative, comprehensive selection of the work of Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), one of the most distinctive writers of the Victorian period. The first selection to place Clough's poetry alongside his prose, it allows readers to explore how his poems are connected to his literary criticism and his lectures on literary history, to his letters and diaries, and to his writing on politics and economics. A political radical and religious sceptic, Clough emerges as a strikingly modern Victorian: he writes honestly and directly about sexuality, and his work is informed by a cosmopolitan perspective that views Victorian society in the context of other national, political, and cultural traditions. Clough's innovative poems incorporate a diverse range of voices and styles, borrowing and reimagining aspects of the epic, the drama, and the novel. And they reveal a side of Victorian culture--irreverent, iconoclastic, and self-aware--that is often ignored today. Detailed notes identify and explain Clough's comments on major political events such as the European revolutions of 1848, and his allusions to a wide array of different writers and texts. The edition includes an Introduction to the life and works of Clough, and a Chronology, which enhance the study, understanding, and enjoyment of these works.

Arthur Hugh Clough

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. Anthony Kenny (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990), 13. 7. The Complete Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot (London: Faber, 1969), 75. 8. The Bothie, in The Poems of Arthur Hugh Clough, ...

Arthur Hugh Clough

Swinburne called him a bad poet, Tennyson called him dull, Saintsbury called him thin. John Schad celebrates Clough the anti-poet, a loving laureate of the extraordinary dull, who is so thin we can see through, or beyond him. Clough, argues Schad, never gets in the way of the world, or worlds, of which he writes. And these worlds are many: ranging from the orthodox world of the Anglican Oxford that Clough famously abandons, through the turbulent worlds of Paris and Rome that Clough visits in the wake of the revolutionary events of 1848, to the quietly desperate world of Clough's final years. For Schad, though, Clough's defining world is the very strange world of continental thought, a world which makes him a most un-Victorian Victorian.

The Collected Works of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Buzard, James, The Beaten Track: European Tourism, Literature, and the Ways to 'Culture', 1800–1918 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998). ... Clough, Arthur Hugh, The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. Anthony Kenny (Oxford: ...

The Collected Works of Gerard Manley Hopkins

This volume, the latest in Oxford's edition of The Collected Works of Gerard Manley Hopkins, presents Hopkins at his most private and self-considering: there are mundane memoranda about neckties to purchase or letters to write, but also exacting revisions of poems. There are entries of quiet rapture, his attention caught by the unexpected sight of a bluebell or "some delicate flying shafted ashes...between which the sun sent straight bright slenderish panes of silver sunbeams down the slant towards the eye." Paintings, sculptures, and works of literature are stringently assessed, his aesthetic principles freely exercised. There are also nightmares relived; undergraduate "sins" unsparingly recorded; "signs" of heavenly mercy carefully noted; small acts of "kindness" from others, both unexpected and restorative, gratefully acknowledged. Like most diarists, Hopkins was committed to life-writing practices not simply to itemize his daily activities, but to explore the possibilities of textual "selving." The space of the page was the opportunity, incitement, and necessity of reporting what had been seen, what had been felt, what had been feared, in order both to memorialize the experiences and to make possible subsequent re-readings. Thus, the diaries and notebooks are a summary of the present and an investment in-even a prediction of-future responses. The entries extend from September 1863, during his second term at Oxford, until February 1875, while studying theology as a Jesuit in his beloved Wales, and from February 1884 until July 1885, while Hopkins was living at a "third remove" in Dublin, Ireland as a Classics Professor at University College and Fellow of the Royal University of Ireland.

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

This text will be cited as PPR. 4 Arthur Hugh Clough, The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. Anthony Kenny (Oxford, 1990), pp. 3–17, 147–55. 5 For contemporary reactions to the text, see Francis O'Gorman, 'Clough's Difficulties', ...

The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature

This title offers an investigation of the many diverse ways in which literary texts of the classical world have been responded to and refashioned by English writers. Covering English literature from the early Middle Ages to the present, it both synthesizes existing scholarship and presents new research.

A Feminist Case Study in Transnational Migration

2 vols.; Oxford; Clarendon Press; 1957. Clough, Arthur Hugh. Letters and Remains of Arthur Hugh Clough, Sometime Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford. London: Spottiswoode, 1865. Clough, Arthur Hugh. The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough.

A Feminist Case Study in Transnational Migration

Although until now virtually unacknowledged in the field of women’ education, Anne Jemima Clough was active throughout her long life in the field. Among other positions, she held the position of principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, for more than a decade, from 1880 until her death in 1892. But in spite of her prominent position, her achievements were overshadowed by her more visible and vocal contemporaries in higher education, such as Emily Davies and Josephine Butler. Nevertheless, she was always a loyal and tenacious follower and an uncomplaining worker. In a subdued way she lived and laboured fervently for the furtherance of women’s education. Quietly, and with remarkably little encouragement or guidance, she pursued and finally realized her dream, a dream that would at last allow her to help make education accessible to all women. In this volume I have compiled, edited, and annotated most of Anne Jemima Clough’s unpublished papers. In addition to transcribing her diaries, or notebooks, I have incorporated chronologically into the text some examples of the voluminous amount of correspondence she wrote and received during a long life filled with activity The Anne Jemima Clough.papers will not only provide raw material for scholars studying the women’s movement during the nineteenth century, but they will also be a useful and engaging read for all students and scholars of the women’s movement, education, Victorian feminism and gender studies.

Newman and His Contemporaries

Chapter 12 Newman and Arthur Hugh Clough 1 Francis turner palgrave, “memoir” to The Poems of Arthur Hugh Clough (1862), ... 48, and The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. anthony Kenny (oxford, 1991), pp. xxv and 92–94.

Newman and His Contemporaries

This is a book on John Henry Newman's influence on some of the most fascinating characters of the 19th century - and their influence on him. No one in nineteenth-century England had a more varied circle of friends and contacts than John Henry Newman (1801-1890), the priest, theologian, educator, philosopher, poet and writer, who began his career as an Anglican, converted to Catholicism and ended his days a Cardinal. That he was also a leading member of the Oxford Movement, brought the Oratory to England, founded the Catholic University in Dublin and corresponded with men and women from all backgrounds from around the world made him a figure of enormous interest to his contemporaries. In this study of Newman's personal influence, Edward Short looks closely at some of Newman's relations with his contemporaries to show how this prophetic thinker drew on his personal relationships to develop his many insights into faith and life. Some of the contemporaries covered include Keble, Pusey, Gladstone, Matthew Arnold, Richard Holt Hutton, Lady Georgiana Fullerton, and Thackeray. Based on a careful reading of Newman's correspondence, the book offers a fresh look at an extraordinary figure whose work continues to influence our own contemporaries.

The Poet s Mind

Clough, Arthur Hugh, 'Grasmere 1845/Roma 1849' notebook, MS Clough 44.1a (Balliol College, University of Oxford). Clough, Arthur Hugh ... Clough, Arthur Hugh, The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough , ed. Anthony Kenny (Oxford: ...

The Poet s Mind

The Poet's Mind is a comprehensive study of the ways in which Victorian poets thought and wrote about the human mind. It argues that these poets used their writing both to express psychological processes of thought and feeling and to subject those processes to scrutiny and analysis.

The Crisis of Action in Nineteenth century English Literature

Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1993. Byron, George Gordon, 6th Baron. Don Juan. ... Arthur Hugh Clough, the Uncommitted Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962. Clayton, Jay. ... The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough. Ed. Anthony Kenny.

The Crisis of Action in Nineteenth century English Literature

"We think of the nineteenth century as an active age - the age of colonial expansion, revolutions, and railroads, of great exploration and the Great Exhibition. But in reading the works of Romantic and Victorian writers one notices a conflict, what Stefanie Markovits terms "a crisis of action." In her book, The Crisis of Action in Nineteenth-Century English Literature, Markovits maps out this conflict by focusing on four writers: William Wordsworth, Arthur Hugh Clough, George Eliot, and Henry James. Each chapter offers a "case-study" that demonstrates how specific historical contingencies - including reaction to the French Revolution, laissez-faire economic practices, changes in religious and scientific beliefs, and shifts in women's roles - made people in the period hypersensitive to the status of action and its literary co-relative, plot."--BOOK JACKET.

Clough

More recently, Anthony Kenny has published The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough (OUP, 1990), a selection from the journal that C. kept during his years at the university. (b) Biographical studies The most useful of the ...

Clough

This volume represents a selection of some of the best poetry by Arthur Hugh Clough (1810-61). Detailed annotation provides the modern reader with the intellectual, cultural and historical information necessary for a full appreciation of the poet's work. The poems selected span Clough's entire career, with the main focus on his two most important poems, Amours de Voyage and Dipsychus and the Spirit. These poems are discussed at length in the critical introduction and are prefaced by substantial headnotes elucidating their historical background and literary antecedents. Providing a wealth of information about the poet and the context of his work, this volume represents a substantial contribution to the subject in its own right, as well as being essential reading for all students of nineteenth-century literature.

Mind Method and Morality

1984: The Legacy of Wittgenstein (Oxford: Blackwell (hard & paper); Spanish 1990). ... 1985: The Ivory Tower: Essays in Philosophy and Public Policy (Oxford: Blackwell). ... 1990: The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough (ed.) ...

Mind  Method  and Morality

Sir Anthony Kenny is one of the most distinguished and prolific philosophers of our time. In the wide range and historical breadth of his interests, he has influenced many parts of the philosophical landscape, especially in the philosophy of mind and the theory of human action and responsibility. In contrast to many of his contemporaries, who have played down philosophy's debt to its past, Kenny's work has always been rooted in the great tradition of Western philosophical inquiry. Mind, Method and Morality celebrates Kenny's work by focusing on the four great philosophers to whom Kenny has given special attention, namely Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, and Wittgenstein. It contains sixteen essays (four on each philosopher) written by leading specialists in the relevant area. Strongly linked together by their focus on philosophy of mind, action and responsibility, the papers make a significant contribution to those areas of philosophy that Kenny has made particularly his own, and constitute a timely celebration of his work. While keeping to the highest standards of scholarship and philosophical rigour, the volume aims to be engaging and comprehensible to a wide audience, thus mirroring the clarity and accessibility that are the hallmarks of Kenny's own philosophical writings. A preface by the Editors describes Anthony Kenny's philosophical career, and the volume also includes a complete bibliography of his writings.

Practical Visionaries

... short account of A.H. Clough's life see Anthony Kenny's 'Biographical Introduction' to his edition of The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough (Oxford, 1990); and for Clough's relationship with Matthew Arnold see Ian Hamilton, ...

Practical Visionaries

An examination of women educationists in nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain. Working with new paradigms opened up by feminist scholarship, it reveals how women leaders were determined to transform education in the quest for a better society. Previous scholarship has either neglected the contributions of these women or has misplaced them. Consequently intellectual histories of education have come to seem almost exclusively masculine. This collection shows the important role which figures such as Mary Carpenter, Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, Elizabeth Edwards and Maria Montessori played in the struggle to provide greater educational opportunities for women. The contributors are: Anne Bloomfield, Kevin J. Brehony, Norma Clarke, Peter Cunningham, Mary Jane Drummond, Elizabeth Edwards, Mary Hilton, Pam Hirsch, Jane Miller, Hilary Minns, Wendy Robinson, Gillian Sutherland and Ruth Watts.

Intellect and Character in Victorian England

In Pattison as in other diary - keepers , such as his Oxford contemporary Arthur Hugh Clough , intense diary - keeping was a sure indication of inner unhap- piness and loneliness.42 So what happened ? Early in 1875 Francis Pattison ...

Intellect and Character in Victorian England

A major study of a distinguished Victorian intellectual at the epicentre of the revolutions transforming English academic and intellectual life.

Atlantic Republic

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, ed. Anthony Kenny. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990. Clowes, St. John L., dir. No Orchids for Miss Blandish. RKO Pictures, 1948. Cobbett, William. A History of the Protestant Reformation in England ...

Atlantic Republic

Atlantic Republic traces the legacy of the United States both as a place and as an idea in the work of English writers from 1776 to the present day. Seeing the disputes of the Reformation as a precursor to this transatlantic divide, it argues that America has operated since the Revolution as a focal point for various traditions of dissent within English culture. By ranging over writers from Richard Price and Susanna Rowson in the 1790s to Angela Carter and Salman Rushdie at the turn of the twenty-first century, the book argues that America haunts the English literary tradition as a parallel space where ideology and aesthetics are configured differently. Consequently, it suggests, many of the key episodes in British history-parliamentary reform in the 1830s, the imperial designs of the Victorian era, the twentieth-century conflict with fascism, the advance of globalization since 1980-have been shaped by implicit dialogues with American cultural models. Rather than simply reinforcing the benign myth of a 'special relationship', Paul Giles considers how various English writers over the past 200 years have engaged with America for various complicated reasons: its promise of political republicanism (Byron, Mary Shelley); its emphasis on religious disestablishment (Clough, Gissing); its prospect of pastoral regeneration (Ruxton, Lawrence); its vision of scientific futurism (Huxley, Ballard). The book also analyses the complex cultural relations between Britain and the United States around the time of the Second World War, suggesting that writers such as Wodehouse, Isherwood, and Auden understood the United States and Germany to offer alternative versions of the kind of technological modernity that appeared equally hostile to traditional forms of English culture. The book ends with a consideration of ways in which the canon of English literature might appear in a different light if seen from a transnational rather than a familiar national perspective.

Victorian Soul Talk

The Bothie: The Text of 1848. Edited by Patrick Scott. St. Lucia, Australia: University of Queensland Press, 1976. ———. The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough. Edited by Anthony Kenny. Oxford: Clarendon Press ...

Victorian Soul Talk

This book explores the decades between the Reform Acts of 1832 and 1884 when British poets such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arthur Hugh Clough, Robert Browning, and Algernon Charles Swinburne, along with their transatlantic contemporary Walt Whitman, defended the civil rights of disenfranchised souls as Western nations slowly evolved toward modern democracies with shared transnational connections. For in the decades before the new science of psychology transformed the soul into the psyche, poets claimed the spiritual well-being of the body politic as their special moral responsibility. Exploiting the rich aesthetic potential of language, they created poetry with striking sensory appeal to make their readers experience the complex effects of political decisions on public spirit. Within contexts such as Risorgimento Italy, Civil War America, and Second Empire France, these poets spoke from their souls to the souls of their readers to reveal insights that eluded the prosaic forms of fiction, essay, and journalism.

College Cloisters Married Bachelors

Letters of William Stubbs, Bishop of Oxford 1825– 1901 (London: Constable, 1904). ... Pages from the Diary of an Oxford Lady (Oxford: Blackwood, 1932). ... Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough (Oxford: Clarendon, 1990).

College Cloisters   Married Bachelors

Using archival material and many unpublished sources, this work traces the origins of Oxford and Cambridge University colleges as places of learning, founded from the thirteenth century, for unmarried men who were required to take vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, the majority of whom trained for the priesthood. The process reveals how the isolated monk-like existence was gradually transformed from the idea of married Fellows at University Colleges being considered absurd into considering it absurd not to allow Fellows to marry and keep their fellowships and therefore their income. This book shows how the Church was accepted as an essential element in society with university trained Churchmen becoming influential in Crown, government, and State. As part of the cataclysmic change from Catholic to Protestant religion, Edward VI and his Council permitted priests to marry, partly to declare their allegiance to the new Protestant religion and their rejection of the old. However, within the university colleges the rule that Fellows would lose their fellowships immediately on marriage was insisted upon. Why a group of individuals were instructed to remain set in a medieval monastic way of life within a nineteenth-century institution is traced in conjunction with how anomalies arose, were absorbed, accepted or challenged by a few courageous individuals prior to bringing about the ultimate change to the statutes in 1882.

Nineteenth Century Poetry and Liberal Thought

The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough, 2 vols. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990), vol. 1, vii). Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's seminal account of Alfred Tennyson's The Princess (1847) is the first to theorize the kind of homosocial ...

Nineteenth Century Poetry and Liberal Thought

This book explores the relationship between nineteenth-century poetry and liberal philosophy. It carries out a reassessment of the aesthetic possibilities of liberalism and it considers the variety of ways that poetry by William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arthur Hugh Clough, George Meredith, Robert Browning, Matthew Arnold and Algernon Charles Swinburne responds to and participates in urgent philosophical, social and political debates about liberty and the rule of law. It provides an account of poetry’s intervention into four different sites where liberalism has a stake: the self, the university, married life and the nation state and it seeks to assert the peculiar capacity of poetry to articulate liberal concerns, proposing poetic language as a means of liberal enquiry.

The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson English traits

The company discussed Swedenborg , Jakob Boehme , the Bhagavad Gita , Plato , and Carlyle ( The Oxford Diaries of Arthur Hugh Clough , ed . Anthony Kenny [ Oxford : Clarendon Press , 1990 ] , pp . 245-246 ) .

The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson  English traits

Records the creative and intellectual development of Emerson as a man of letters through a collection of his writings