The Oxford History of Board Games

This is not primarily a how-to book, although the rules and strategies of certain games are discussed in detail, neither does it offer sure-fire tips for success, although with a fuller understanding of a game the reader will undoubtedly ...

The Oxford History of Board Games

For thousands of years, people have been planning attacks, captures, chases, and conquests - on a variety of different boards designed for an astonishing diversity of games. Today the compelling mix of strategy, skill, and chance is as strong as ever; new board games are invented almost daily,while the perennial favourites continue to attract new devotees and reveal new possibilities.The Oxford History of Board Games investigates the principles of board games throughout the ages and across the world, exploring the fascinating similarities and differences that give each its unique appeal, and drawing out the significance of game-playing as a central part of human experience - asvital to a culture as its music, dance, and tales. Beautifully illustrated and with diagrams to show the finer points of the games, this is a fascinating and accessible guide to a richly rewarding subject.In his trade-mark accessible, entertaining style, David Parlett looks at the different families of games: games based on configuration or connection, races or chases, wars or hunts, capture or blockade. He focuses mainly on traditional games, the folk entertainments that have grown up organicallythrough the centuries, and which exhibit endless local variations, although he discusses also the commercial products that have tried, with varying degrees of success, to match their astonishing popularity.This is not primarily a how-to book, although the rules and strategies of certain games are discussed in detail, neither does it offer sure-fire tips for success, although with a fuller understanding of a game the reader will undoubtedly become a better-informed, if not better, player. Rather, itis an affectionate and authoritative survey of one of the most familiar parts of our cultural history, which has until now been inexplicably neglected.

Parlett s History of Board Games

Focuses on different families of traditional games and folk entertainments, with some discussion of rules and strategies.

Parlett s History of Board Games

Focuses on different families of traditional games and folk entertainments, with some discussion of rules and strategies.

Board and Table Games from Many Civilizations

Falkener, E., Games Ancient and Oriental, 1892, pp. 217-24. CHINESE CHESS Hyde, T., Historia Shakiludii, Oxford, 1694, p. 158. Culin, S., Korean Games, Philadephia, 1895, p. 82. Murray, H. J. R., Oxford, History of Chess, 1913, p. 119.

Board and Table Games from Many Civilizations

This encyclopedic volume provides the rules and methods of play for more than 180 different games: Ma-jong, Hazard, Wei-ch'i (Go), Backgammon, Pachisi, and many others. Over 300 photographs and line drawings.

Gaming Empire in Children s British Board Games 1836 1860

The Oxford History of Board Games. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Parsons, Timothy H. The British Imperial Century, 1815–1914: A World History Perspective. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999.

Gaming Empire in Children s British Board Games  1836 1860

Over a century before Monopoly invited child players to bankrupt one another with merry ruthlessness, a lively and profitable board game industry thrived in Britain from the 1750s onward, thanks to publishers like John Wallis, John Betts, and William Spooner. As part of the new wave of materials catering to the developing mass market of child consumers, the games steadily acquainted future upper- and middle-class empire builders (even the royal family themselves) with the strategies of imperial rule: cultivating, trading, engaging in conflict, displaying, and competing. In their parlors, these players learned the techniques of successful colonial management by playing games such as Spooner’s A Voyage of Discovery, or Betts’ A Tour of the British Colonies and Foreign Possessions. These games shaped ideologies about nation, race, and imperial duty, challenging the portrait of Britons as "absent-minded imperialists." Considered on a continuum with children’s geography primers and adventure tales, these games offer a new way to historicize the Victorians, Britain, and Empire itself. The archival research conducted here illustrates the changing disciplinary landscape of children’s literature/culture studies, as well as nineteenth-century imperial studies, by situating the games at the intersection of material and literary culture.

Board Games in 100 Moves

I. L. Finkel (British Museum, 2008); A History of Board Games Other Than Chess by H. J. R. Murrah (Gardners Books, 1952); Board And Table Games from Many Civilizations by R. C. Bell (Dover edition, 1979); Oxford History of Board Games ...

Board Games in 100 Moves

Surprising stories behind the games you know and love to play. Journey through 8,000 years of history, from Ancient Egyptian Senet and Indian Snakes and Ladders, right up to role-play, fantasy and hybrid games of the present day. More than 100 games are explored chronologically, from the most ancient to the most modern. Every chapter is full of insightful anecdotes exploring everything from design and acquisition to game play and legacy. Discover tales of Buddha's banned games, stolen patents, boards smuggled into prison, and Dungeons & Dragons hysteria. Roll six to start, pass go, and learn more about your favourite board games, from Mahjong to Monopoly and more!

Rules of Play

To return to our earlier example of the abandoned punishment and reward that happen on the board , the history lot baseball game , the rule about the tree trunk ( and not the of the game's development , the demographic profile of its ...

Rules of Play

Meaningful play - Design - Systems - Interactivity - Defining games - The magic circle - Defining rules - Rules on three levels - The rules of digital games - Games as systems of uncertainty - Games as systems of information - Games as cybernetic systems - Games as systems of conflict - Games as the play of experience - Games as the play of meaning - Games as the play of simulation - Games as cultural rhetoric - Games as cultural resistance - Games as cultural environment.

Games of Empires

Parlett, David (1999): The Oxford History of Board Games, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Passepartout (Hrsg.) (2013): Weltnetzwerke – Weltspiele. Jules Vernes „In 80 Tagen um die Welt“, Konstanz: Wallstein. Pusch, Edgar B. (1979): Das ...

Games of Empires

Brettspiele gehören zu den ältesten kulturellen Praktiken. Sie nehmen mit ihrer spezifischen Form unter den Spielen eine besondere Rolle ein. Zugleich gehört das "Anderssein" im Unterschied zum gewöhnlichen Leben auch zu ihren Grundmerkmalen. In Brettspielen werden Realitäten abgebildet, aber auch neu konstruiert. Sechzehn Beiträge untersuchen, wie sich imperiale Herrschaftsformen unterschiedlicher Epochen auf die Spielkulturen auswirken, wie weit Brettspiele die Mentalität einer Gesellschaft befestigen und welche Reflexionen die Literatur zu ihrer gesellschaftlichen Bedeutung bietet.

Rerolling Boardgames

Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. McNamara, Robert S. 1995. In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam. New york: TimesBooks. Parlett, David. 1999. The Oxford History of Board Games. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Ruhnke, Volko.

Rerolling Boardgames

Despite the advent and explosion of videogames, boardgames--from fast-paced party games to intensely strategic titles--have in recent years become more numerous and more diverse in terms of genre, ethos and content. The growth of gaming events and conventions such as Essen Spiel, Gen Con and the UK Games EXPO, as well as crowdfunding through sites like Kickstarter, has diversified the evolution of game development, which is increasingly driven by fans, and boardgames provide an important glue to geek culture. In academia, boardgames are used in a practical sense to teach elements of design and game mechanics. Game studies is also recognizing the importance of expanding its focus beyond the digital. As yet, however, no collected work has explored the many different approaches emerging around the critical challenges that boardgaming represents. In this collection, game theorists analyze boardgame play and player behavior, and explore the complex interactions between the sociality, conflict, competition and cooperation that boardgames foster. Game designers discuss the opportunities boardgame system designs offer for narrative and social play. Cultural theorists discuss boardgames' complex history as both beautiful physical artifacts and special places within cultural experiences of play.

A Book of Historic Board Games

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913. [42] Murray, H. J. R. A History of Board-Games Other than Chess. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1952. [43] Parker, H. Ancient Ceylon. London: Luzac & Co., 1909. [44] Parlett, D. Oxford History of Board ...

A Book of Historic Board Games

Board games have been played throughout the world for thousands of years. Many times, in many different cultures, people have amused themselves by devising mock races, battles and hunts, played in miniature on a small surface. The rules and the level of sophistication have changed through the ages, but the general idea has remained the same. Some of the oldest games, like backgammon, chess and draughts, are still popular today. This book looks at twelve different games taken from various periods of history. Most will not be recognised by the general public, but deserve to be better known. They are pachisi, halma, agon, tab, fanorona, nine men's morris, wari, konane, xiang qi, tablut, asalto and renju. Each game has a whole chapter to itself, which includes a history, the rules, and a section on strategy and tactics. It is the author's intention that the reader will gain appreciation and enthusiasm for these wonderful old games, and be entertained by them for years to come.

Who s in the Game

James J. Shea and Charles Mercer, It's All in the Game (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1960); David Parlett, The Oxford History of Board Games (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999). 3. Ofcourse, such shared experiences can also be ...

Who s in the Game

Some board games--like Candy Land, Chutes & Ladders, Clue, Guess Who, The Game of Life, Monopoly, Operation and Payday--have popularity spanning generations. But over time, updates to games have created significantly different messages about personal identity and evolving social values. Games offer representations of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion, age, ability and social class that reflect the status quo and respond to social change. Using popular mass-market games, this rhetorical assessment explores board design, game implements (tokens, markers, 3-D elements) and playing instructions. This book argues the existence of board games as markers of an ever-changing sociocultural framework, exploring the nature of play and how games embody and extend societal themes and values.

Critical Play

13. Parlett, The Oxford History of Board Games, 168. Fairbairn, “Go in Ancient China,” par. 16. See also Fairbairn's classic, Invitation to Go. Rollefson, “A Neolithic Game Board,” 1–3. Murray, A History of Board Games other than chess, ...

Critical Play

An examination of subversive games—games designed for political, aesthetic, and social critique. For many players, games are entertainment, diversion, relaxation, fantasy. But what if certain games were something more than this, providing not only outlets for entertainment but a means for creative expression, instruments for conceptual thinking, or tools for social change? In Critical Play, artist and game designer Mary Flanagan examines alternative games—games that challenge the accepted norms embedded within the gaming industry—and argues that games designed by artists and activists are reshaping everyday game culture. Flanagan provides a lively historical context for critical play through twentieth-century art movements, connecting subversive game design to subversive art: her examples of “playing house” include Dadaist puppet shows and The Sims. She looks at artists' alternative computer-based games and explores games for change, considering the way activist concerns—including worldwide poverty and AIDS—can be incorporated into game design. Arguing that this kind of conscious practice—which now constitutes the avant-garde of the computer game medium—can inspire new working methods for designers, Flanagan offers a model for designing that will encourage the subversion of popular gaming tropes through new styles of game making, and proposes a theory of alternate game design that focuses on the reworking of contemporary popular game practices.

Playthings in Early Modernity

the world through maps, geography, and iconic markers on game boards and playing cards, coupled with the rise and regulation of domestically produced games, eventually gave way to ... 17 Parlett, The Oxford History of Board Games, 5.

Playthings in Early Modernity

An innovative volume of fifteen interdisciplinary essays at the nexus of material culture, performance studies, and game theory, Playthings in Early Modernity emphasizes the rules of the game(s) as well as the breaking of those rules. Thus, the titular "plaything" is understood as both an object and a person, and play, in the early modern world, is treated not merely as a pastime, a leisurely pursuit, but as a pivotal part of daily life, a strategic psychosocial endeavor.

Videogame Sciences and Arts

Clarendon Press, UK (1952) Parlett, D.: The Oxford History of Board Games, vol. 5. Oxford University Press, Oxford (1999) Jones, C.E., Liapis, A., Lykourentzou, I., Guido, D.: Board game prototyping to co-design a better location-based ...

Videogame Sciences and Arts

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Videogame Sciences and Arts, VJ 2019, held in Aveiro, Portugal, in November 2019. The 20 full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 50 submissions. They were organized in topical sections named: Games and Theories; Table Boards; eSports; Uses and Methodologies; Game Criticism.

Games of History

Norris Kamala O. (2004), “Gender Stereotypes, Aggression, and Computer Games: An Online Survey of Women”, Cyber Psychology & Behavior 7(6): ... Parlett David (1999), The Oxford History of Board Games, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Games of History

Games of History provides an understanding of how games as artefacts, textual and visual sources on games and gaming as a pastime or a “serious” activity can be used as sources for the study of history. From the vast world of games, the book’s focus is on board and card games, with reference to physical games, sports and digital games as well. Considering culture, society, politics and metaphysics, the author uses examples from various places around the world and from ancient times to the present to demonstrate how games and gaming can offer the historian an alternative, often very valuable and sometimes unique path to the past. The book offers a thorough discussion of conceptual and material approaches to games as sources, while also providing the reader with a theoretical starting point for further study within specific thematic chapters. The book concludes with three case studies of different types of games and how they can be considered as historical sources: the gladiatorial games, chess and the digital game Civilization. Offering an alternative approach to the study of history through its focus on games and gaming as historical sources, this is the ideal volume for students considering different types of sources and how they can be used for historical study, as well as students who study games as primary or secondary sources in their history projects.

Cultural Contacts and Cultural Identity

Murray, Harold James Ruthven 1952: A history of board-games other than chess, Oxford. Niehues, Jan 2014: »Die Brettspiele des mittelalterlichen Irland und Wales«, in: Matthias Teichert (Hg.), Sport und Spiel bei den Germanen.

Cultural Contacts and Cultural Identity

This collection of essays by researchers from a wide area of fields, among them classical and modern literature, archeology, philosophy, linguistics, and social sciences, focusses on the theme of a continued interaction between culture and identity as well as the contact between people of different cultural backgrounds. This multilingual volume compiles essays in English and German.

Eurogames

“Review: The Oxford History of Board Games.” Retrieved May 4, 2009, from http:// www.gamecabinet.com/reviews/OxfordHisto ryBoardGames.html, 2000. Sigman, T. “Pawn Takes Megabyte.” The Es— capist. Retrieved October 4, 2008, from http:// ...

Eurogames

"This book chronicles the evolution of tabletop hobby gaming, explores why hobbyists play eurogames, how players balance the structure of competitive play with the demands of an intimate social gathering, and to what extent the social context of the gameencounter shapes the playing experience. This innovative work highlights a popular alternative trend in the gaming community"--

Pleasure and Leisure in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Cultural-Historical Perspectives on Toys, Games, and Entertainment Albrecht Classen ... Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed. (1989), s.v. “morris.” Murray, History of Board Games (see note 63), 38. Murray, History of Board Games (see note ...

Pleasure and Leisure in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Jan Huizinga and Roger Caillois have already taught us to realize how important games and play have been for pre-modern civilization. Recent research has begun to acknowledge the fundamental importance of these aspects in cultural, religious, philosophical, and literary terms. This volume expands on the traditional approach still very much focused on the materiality of game (toys, cards, dice, falcons, dolls, etc.) and acknowledges that game constituted also a form of coming to terms with human existence in an unstable and volatile world determined by universal randomness and fortune. Whether considering blessings or horse fighting, falconry or card games, playing with dice or dolls, we can gain a much deeper understanding of medieval and early modern society when we consider how people pursued pleasure and how they structured their leisure time. The contributions examine a wide gamut of approaches to pleasure, considering health issues, eroticism, tournaments, playing music, reading and listening, drinking alcohol, gambling and throwing dice. This large issue was also relevant, of course, in non-Christian societies, and constitutes a critical concern both for the past and the present because we are all homines ludentes.

Games and Game Playing in European Art and Literature 16th 17th Centuries

Moyer, Ann E. The Philosopher's Game: Rithmomachia in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002. Murray, Harold James Ruthven. A History of Board-games Other Than Chess. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1952 ...

Games and Game Playing in European Art and Literature  16th 17th Centuries

This collection of essays examines the vogue for games and game playing as expressed in art, architecture, and literature in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. Moving beyond previous scholarship on game theory, game monographs, and period and regional studies on games, this volume analyzes a range of artistic and literary works produced in England, Scotland, Italy, France, and Germany, which used the game topos to illuminate special themes. In essays dealing with chess, playing cards, dice, gambling, and board and children's games, scholars show how games not only functioned as recreational pastimes, but were also used for demonstrations of wit and skill, courtship rituals, didactic and moralistic instruction, commercial enterprises, and displays of status. Offering new iconographical and literary interpretations, these studies reveal how game play became a metaphor for broader cultural issues related to gender, age, and class differences, social order, politics and religion, and ethical and sexual behavior.

Tabletop

BA History, University of Colorado, Boulder, Co. ... books are The Penguin Book of Card Games (1979, latest edition 2008), The Oxford Guide to Card Games (aka A History of Card Games, 1991) and The Oxford History of Board Games (1999).

Tabletop

In this volume, people of diverse backgrounds talk about tabletop games, game culture, and the intersection of games with learning, theater, and other forms. Some have chosen to write about their design process, others about games they admire, others about the culture of tabletop games and their fans. The results are various and individual, but all cast some light on what is a multivarious and fascinating set of game styles.

Characteristics of Games

Murray , H. J. R. A History of Board Games Other Than Chess . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 1951 . Norvig , Peter . Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming : Case Studies in Common Lisp . San Francisco : Morgan Kaufmann ...

Characteristics of Games

Understanding games--whether computer games, card games, board games, or sports--by analyzing certain common traits. Characteristics of Games offers a new way to understand games: by focusing on certain traits--including number of players, rules, degrees of luck and skill needed, and reward/effort ratio--and using these characteristics as basic points of comparison and analysis. These issues are often discussed by game players and designers but seldom written about in any formal way. This book fills that gap. By emphasizing these player-centric basic concepts, the book provides a framework for game analysis from the viewpoint of a game designer. The book shows what all genres of games--board games, card games, computer games, and sports--have to teach each other. Today's game designers may find solutions to design problems when they look at classic games that have evolved over years of playing.