The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics

With original contributions from a stellar cast, this volume provides economists – especially those interested in macroeconomics and the history of economic thought – with the first in-depth analysis of LSE economics.

The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics

The London School of Economics (LSE) has been and continues to be one of the most important global centres for economics. With six chapters on themes in LSE economics and 29 chapters on the lives and work of LSE economists, this volume shows how economics became established at the School, how it produced some of the world’s best-known economists, including Lionel Robbins and Bill Phillips, plus Nobel Prize winners, such as Friedrich Hayek, John Hicks and Christopher Pissarides, and how it remains a global force for the very best in teaching and research in economics. With original contributions from a stellar cast, this volume provides economists – especially those interested in macroeconomics and the history of economic thought – with the first in-depth analysis of LSE economics.

The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics

Journal of Economic Surveys, 30(3): 403–429. Pretis, F., J.J. Reade and G. Sucarrat ... 'Uncertain Impacts on Economic Growth when Stabilizing Global Temperatures at 1.5°C or 2°C Warming'. ... The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics.

The Palgrave Companion to Oxford Economics

The University of Oxford has been and continues to be one of the most important global centres for economics. With six chapters on themes in Oxford economics and 24 chapters on the lives and work of Oxford economists, this volume shows how economics became established at the University, how it produced some of the world’s best-known economists, including Francis Ysidro Edgeworth, Roy Harrod and David Hendry, and how it remains a global force for the very best in teaching and research in economics. With original contributions from a stellar cast, this volume provides economists – especially those interested in macroeconomics and the history of economic thought – with the first in-depth analysis of Oxford economics.

The Palgrave Companion to Cambridge Economics

... doubts about the applicability of econometrics to complex economic processes, where numerous factors, many unmeasurable, ... in a chapter 'LSE and econometrics' to be included in the forthcoming Palgrave companion to LSE economics.

The Palgrave Companion to Cambridge Economics

Cambridge University has and continues to be one of the most important centres for economics. With nine chapters on themes in Cambridge economics and over 40 chapters on the lives and work of Cambridge economists, this volume shows how economics became established at the university, how it produced some of the world's best-known economists, including John Maynard Keynes and Alfred Marshall, plus Nobel Prize winners, such as Richard Stone and James Mirrlees, and how it remains a global force for the very best in teaching and research in economics. With original contributions from a stellar cast, this volume provides economists – especially those interested in macroeconomics and the history of economic thought – with the first in-depth analysis of Cambridge economics.

History and Economic Life

157–186; and Colin M. Lewis, 'Economic History at the London School of Economics and Political Science: A View from the Periphery' in Robert A. Cord (ed.), The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), ...

History and Economic Life

History and Economic Life offers students a wide-ranging introduction to both quantitative and qualitative approaches to interpreting economic history sources from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Having identified an ever-widening gap between the use of qualitative sources by cultural historians and quantitative sources by economic historians, the book aims to bridge the divide by making economic history sources more accessible to students and the wider public, and highlighting the need for a complementary rather than exclusive approach. Divided into two parts, the book begins by equipping students with a toolbox to approach economic history sources, considering the range of sources that might be of use and introducing different ways of approaching them. The second part consists of case studies that examine how economic historians use such sources, helping readers to gain a sense of context and understanding of how these sources can be used. The book thereby sheds light on important debates both within and beyond the field, and highlights the benefits gained when combining qualitative and quantitative approaches to source analysis. Introducing sources often avoided in culturally-minded history or statistically-minded economic history courses respectively, and advocating a combined quantitative and qualitative approach, it is an essential resource for students undertaking source analysis within the field.

Constructing Economic Science

His approach to contemporary accounting practice is sketched in Christopher J. Napier, 'Accounting and the Influence of Economics at LSE', in Robert A. Cord (ed.) The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics ...

Constructing Economic Science

An accessible account of the role of the modern university in the creation of economics During the late nineteenth century concerns about international commercial rivalry were often expressed in terms of national provision for training and education, and the role of universities in such provision. It was in this context that the modern university discipline of economics emerged. The first undergraduate economics program was inaugurated in Cambridge in 1903; but this was merely a starting point. Constructing Economic Science charts the path through commercial education to the discipline of economics and the creation of an economics curriculum that could then be replicated around the world. Rather than describing this transition epistemologically, as a process of theoretical creation, Keith Tribe shows how the new "science" of economics was primarily an institutional creation of the modern university. He demonstrates how finance, student numbers, curricula, teaching, new media, the demands of employment, and more broadly, the international perception that industrializing economies required a technically-skilled workforce, all played their part in shaping economics as we know it today. This study explains the conditions originally shaping the science of economics, providing in turn a foundation for an understanding of the way in which this new language transformed public policy.

Economic Theory in the Twentieth Century An Intellectual History Volume II

Journal of Economic Literature 17 (3): 970–988. Collard, David A. 1993. High Hicks, Deep Hicks, and Equilibrium. History of Political Economy 25 (2): 331–350. Cord, Robert A. 2018. Arnold Plant. In The Palgrave Companion to LSE ...

Economic Theory in the Twentieth Century  An Intellectual History   Volume II

This book, set out over three-volumes, provides a comprehensive history of economic thought in the 20th century with special attention to the cultural and historical background in the development of theories, to the leading or the peripheral research communities and their interactions, and finally to an assessment and critical appreciation of economic theories. Volume II addresses economic theory in the period between the two world wars in which the economic theory went through a process of criticism of old mainstream, deconstruction and reconstruction and theoretical ferment which involved the intellectual communities of economists emphasizing their nature of evolving interacting entities. This work provides a significant and original contribution to the history of economic thought and gives insight to the thinking of some of the major international figures in economics. It will appeal to students, scholars and the more informed reader wishing to further their understanding of the history of the discipline.

Transfer State

2, edited by Robert A. Cord (Basingstoke, 2017), 1151–74; Howard Glennerster, LSE's Contributions to the Economics of Social Policy', in The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics, edited by Robert A. Cord (Basingstoke, 2018), 145–64.

Transfer State

The idea of a guaranteed minimum income has been central to British social policy debates for more than a century. Since the First World War, a variety of market economists, radical activists, and social reformers have emphasized the possibility of tackling poverty through direct cash transfers between the state and its citizens. As manufacturing employment has declined and wage inequality has grown since the 1970s, cash benefits and tax credits have become an important source of income for millions of working-age households, including many low-paid workers with children. The nature and purpose of these transfer payments, however, remain highly contested. Conservative and New Labour governments have used in-work benefits and conditionality requirements to 'activate' the unemployed and reinforce the incentives to take low-paid work - an approach which has reached its apogee in Universal Credit. By contrast, a growing number of campaigners have argued that the challenge of providing economic security in an age of automation would be better met by paying a Universal Basic Income to all citizens. Transfer State provides the first detailed history of guaranteed income proposals in modern Britain, which brings together intellectual history and archival research to show how the pursuit of an integrated tax and benefit system has shaped UK public policy since 1918. The result is a major new analysis of the role of cash transfers in the British welfare state which sets Universal Credit in a historical perspective and examines the cultural and political barriers to a Universal Basic Income.

Debates in Macroeconomics from the Great Depression to the Long Recession

Hagemann, H (2017), “Franco Modigliani as “American” Keynesian: How the University in Exile Economists Influenced Economics”, Social Research, vol. 84, pp. ... 431–461, in The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics, Cord, R. A. (ed.) ...

Debates in Macroeconomics from the Great Depression to the Long Recession


Paul Samuelson

... The Palgrave Companion to Cambridge Economics (editor; 2017) and The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics (editor; 2018), and his articles have appeared in the Cambridge Journal of Economics and the History of Political Economy.

Paul Samuelson

A significant part of economics as we know it today is the outcome of battles that took place in the post-war years between Keynesians and monetarists. In the US, the focus of these battles was often between the neo-Keynesians at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Chicago monetarists. The undisputed leader of the MIT Keynesians was Paul A. Samuelson, one of the most influential economists of the 20th century and arguably of all time. Samuelson’s output covered a vast number of subjects within economics, the quality of theseoften pioneering contributions unmatched in the modern era. The volume focuses both on how Samuelson’s work has been developed by others and on how that work fits into subsequent developments in the various fields of speciality within which Samuelson operated.

The Gypsy Economist

Chandavarkar, A. 2003, 'Sir Hans Singer: The Life and Work of a Development Economist by D. John Shaw', Economic Development and Cultural Change, 52(1): 237–239. ... The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics. London: Palgrave Macmillan: ...

The Gypsy Economist

This book offers the first intellectual biography of the Anglo Australian economist, Colin Clark. Despite taking the economics world by storm with a mercurial ability for statistical analysis, Clark’s work has been largely overlooked in the 30 years since his death. His career was punctuated by a number of firsts. He was the first economist to derive the concept of GNP, the first to broach development economics and to foresee the re-emergence of India and China within the global economy. In 1945, he predicted the rise and persistence of inflation when taxation levels exceeded 25 per cent of GNP. And he was also the first economist to debunk post-war predictions of mass hunger by arguing that rapid population growth engendered economic development. Clark wandered through the fields of applied economics in much the same way as he rambled through the English countryside and the Australian bush. His imaginative wanderings qualify him as the eminent gypsy economist for the 20th century.

The Alternative Austrian Economics

The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 289–310. King, J.E. 2018c. 'Economic thought from stagflation and sustained growth to the Great Recession and beyond, 1974–2017', in S. Barbour, J. Cicarelli and ...

The Alternative Austrian Economics

For most economists, ‘Austrian economics’ refers to a distinct school of thought, originating with Mises and Hayek and characterised by a strong commitment to free-market liberalism. This innovative book explores an alternative Austrian tradition in economics. Demonstrating how the debate on the economics of socialism began in Austria long before the 1930s, it analyses the work and impact of many leading Austrian economists through a century of Austrian socialist economics.

Markets and Morals

Economic liberalization and violent crime. Journal of Law and Economics, 55(4): 925–948. QUAH, Euston & NG, Yew-Kwang (2018). Ezra J. Mishan (1917–2014), in The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics (ed, CORD, Robert A.).

Markets and Morals

The book is researched and written with strong academic rigor and persuasive argument that also makes it accessible to the general public. Considering efficiency, equality, and morality, it argues for market expansion, particularly in legalizing kidney sales and prostitution. These are highly controversial issues with important public policy significance.

The Neoliberal Age

67 Richard Dickens, 'Child poverty in Britain: Past lessons and future prospects', National Institute Economic Review, ... The Palgrave Companion to LSE Economics (Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), 805–30; Damian McBride, ...

The Neoliberal Age

The late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries are commonly characterised as an age of ‘neoliberalism’ in which individualism, competition, free markets and privatisation came to dominate Britain’s politics, economy and society. This historical framing has proven highly controversial, within both academia and contemporary political and public debate. Standard accounts of neoliberalism generally focus on the influence of political ideas in reshaping British politics; according to this narrative, neoliberalism was a right-wing ideology, peddled by political economists, think-tanks and politicians from the 1930s onwards, which finally triumphed in the 1970s and 1980s. The Neoliberal Age? suggests this narrative is too simplistic. Where the standard story sees neoliberalism as right-wing, this book points to some left-wing origins, too; where the standard story emphasises the agency of think-tanks and politicians, this book shows that other actors from the business world were also highly significant. Where the standard story can suggest that neoliberalism transformed subjectivities and social lives, this book illuminates other forces which helped make Britain more individualistic in the late twentieth century. The analysis thus takes neoliberalism seriously but also shows that it cannot be the only explanatory framework for understanding contemporary Britain. The book showcases cutting-edge research, making it useful to researchers and students, as well as to those interested in understanding the forces that have shaped our recent past.

Harold Cecil Edey

The rate of interest: Its nature, determination and relation to economic phenomena. New York, NY: The MacMillan Company. ... In R. A. Cord (Ed.), The Palgrave companion to LSE economics (pp. 79–111). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Harold Cecil Edey

Harold Cecil Edey was instrumental in the development of British accounting thought in the mid-1900s, and his scholarship influenced a generation of students. This edited collection of his unpublished manuscripts sheds light on his contribution to modern accounting thought.

The short guide to social policy Second edition

Alcock, P., M. May and S.Wright (eds) (2012) The student's companion to social policy, Oxford:Wiley-Blackwell. ... in Europe and North America: a report supported by the Sutton Trust, London: LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

The short guide to social policy  Second edition

This fully updated edition of an essential introductory text offers a concise guide to the key structures and concepts in social policy and is now supplemented by unique and innovative digital content that adds depth and provides a truly integrated way of learning. It is accompanied by a digital app, which is free to download and use with the book, that includes short videos with commentary, interactive charts and ‘unboxed’ examples that expand key issues raised in the text, enabling students to engage more deeply with statistical information. The book draws on examples from around the world and focuses on explaining key terms and introducing key debates. Written by experienced authors and teachers, the text explores the five pillars of welfare; social security, employment, education, health and housing, and this new edition adds a further chapter providing an overview of other fields such as criminal justice, social care and family policy. This will be an invaluable resource for students new to social policy.

Know it All Find it Fast for Academic Libraries

The website has a collection guide which lists useful databases and websites. LSE Library www2.lse.ac.uk/library/subjectGuides/Home.aspx Library of the London School of Economics. Has extensive current and historic holdings of economics ...

Know it All  Find it Fast for Academic Libraries

A comprehensive and easy-to-use version of the best-selling Know it All, Find It Fast developed specifically for information professionals working in academic libraries, this will help you to tackle the questions most commonly asked by students, academics and researchers. A broad cross-disciplinary A-Z of themes including topics such as literature searching, plagiarism and using online resources are covered helping you to address anquery confidently and quickly. Each topic is split into three sections to guide your response: typical questions listing the common enquiries you'll encounter points to consider exploring the issues and challenges that might arise where to look listing annotated UK and international resources in print and online including key organisations, scholarly bodies, digital libraries, statistical data and journal article indexes. Readership: This will prove an indispensable day-to-day guide for anyone working with students, academics and researchers in an academic library.

Theoretical and Practical Reason in Economics

In: Blume LE, Durlauf SN (eds.) The new Palgrave dictionary of economics. Palgrave ... Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science, LSE, London. http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/CPNSS/projects/ContingencyDissentInScience/DP/ ...

Theoretical and Practical Reason in Economics

This book argues for the restoration of theoretical and practical reason to economics, presenting the ideas of Nancy Cartwright and Amartya Sen, and showing they can foster a useful understanding of practical reason for solving problems in science and society.

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology

Including a Symposium on Public Finance in the History of Economic Thought Luca Fiorito, Scott Scheall, Carlos Eduardo Suprinyak. companion by Kurtz and Salvadori (2015). 2. See Takenaga (2016a) for ... London: LSE Selected Pamphlets.

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology

Including chapters on British public debt in the 19th century, French financial controversies in the mid-1800s, and a thoughtful reflection on the USA's New Deal, this volume is a global exploration of public finance history. For researchers interested in the history of economics, this is an essential read containing the most up-to-date research.

Public Service Media in Europe A Comparative Approach

Crafts, N. (2004) 'Fifty Years of Economic Growth in Western Europe. ... London: Palgrave Macmillan. ... Accessed at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/pdf/WP113.pdf Galbraith, J. K. (1994) A Journey Through Economic Time, ...

Public Service Media in Europe  A Comparative Approach

Public service media (PSM) have been the mainstay of Western European broadcasting for a number of decades. Yet despite a general political consensus in favour of PSM, recent technological, economic and political changes have led to a questioning of their value. This new collection of essays explores the history of PSM in selected European countries, from their early establishment as the main media in many countries to charting their transformation and evolution in recent years. The contributions consider the political, economic and market-integration issues that impact PSM, while also highlighting the importance of the ideology that originally accompanied PSM in its initial years, to see how relevant they are in the contemporary world. The book consists of two complementary parts: Part I: Theoretical Aspects and Global Influences on Public Service Media in Europe Part II: A Comparative Analysis of Public Service Media across Europe With contributions from leading experts, the first part offers a thorough examination of the current concepts and conditions that influence PSM in Europe. The second offers a comparative study of PSM in several European countries including France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and Sweden. Offering the most comprehensive study of the field to date, Public Service Media in Europe will be useful for students and researchers in public media, political communication, international and comparative media.