The People Place and Space Reader

Providing an essential resource for students of urban studies, geography, sociology and many other areas, this book brings together important but, till now, widely dispersed writings across many inter-related disciplines.

The People  Place  and Space Reader

The People, Place, and Space Reader brings together the writings of scholars, designers, and activists from a variety of fields to make sense of the makings and meanings of the world we inhabit. They help us to understand the relationships between people and the environment at all scales, and to consider the active roles individuals, groups, and social structures play in creating the environments in which people live, work, and play. These readings highlight the ways in which space and place are produced through large- and small-scale social, political, and economic practices, and offer new ways to think about how people engage the environment in multiple and diverse ways. Providing an essential resource for students of urban studies, geography, sociology and many other areas, this book brings together important but, till now, widely dispersed writings across many inter-related disciplines. Introductions from the editors precede each section; introducing the texts, demonstrating their significance, and outlining the key issues surrounding the topic. A companion website, PeoplePlaceSpace.org, extends the work even further by providing an on-going series of additional reading lists that cover issues ranging from food security to foreclosure, psychiatric spaces to the environments of predator animals.

Mediated Identities in the Futures of Place Emerging Practices and Spatial Cultures

In: The people, place, and space reader, p 212 Koolhaas R (2002) Junkspace. In: October, pp 175–190 Koolhaas R (2014) Delirious New York: a retroactive manifesto for Manhattan. The Monacelli Press, LLC Latorre D (2011) Digital ...

Mediated Identities in the Futures of Place  Emerging Practices and Spatial Cultures

This book examines the emerging problems and opportunities that are posed by media innovations, spatial typologies, and cultural trends in (re)shaping identities within the fast-changing milieus of the early 21st Century. Addressing a range of social and spatial scales and using a phenomenological frame of reference, the book draws on the works of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty and Don Hide to bridge the seemingly disparate, yet related theoretical perspectives across a number of disciplines. Various perspectives are put forward from media, human geography, cultural studies, technologies, urban design and architecture etc. and looked at thematically from networked culture and digital interface (and other) perspectives. The book probes the ways in which new digital media trends affect how and what we communicate, and how they drive and reshape our everyday practices. This mediatization of space, with fast evolving communication platforms and applications of digital representations, offers challenges to our notions of space, identity and culture and the book explores the diverse yet connected levels of technology and people interaction.

Ten Years East

The book contains sixty photographs by Lange, and is accompanied by an essay from the photographer and an excerpt from "The People, Place, and Space Reader," edited by Jen Jack Gieseking, William Mangold, Cindi Katz, Setha Low, and Susan ...

Ten Years East

"Ten Years East" is a collection of photographs by Gerard Lange, associate professor of Art & Design at Barton College in Wilson, NC. These images are his exploration of how the idea of "place," along with regional ideologies, inform the ways in which artists view the world. The book contains sixty photographs by Lange, and is accompanied by an essay from the photographer and an excerpt from "The People, Place, and Space Reader," edited by Jen Jack Gieseking, William Mangold, Cindi Katz, Setha Low, and Susan Saegert.

The Routledge Handbook of Place

Gieseking, J. and Mangold, W. (eds.) (2014). The People, Place, and Space Reader. New York: Routledge. Grodach, C. (2010). Art spaces, public space and the link to community development. Community Development Journal, 45 (4), 474–493.

The Routledge Handbook of Place

The handbook presents a compendium of the diverse and growing approaches to place from leading authors as well as less widely known scholars, providing a comprehensive yet cutting-edge overview of theories, concepts and creative engagements with place that resonate with contemporary concerns and debates. The volume moves away from purely western-based conceptions and discussions about place to include perspectives from across the world. It includes an introductory chapter, which outlines key definitions, draws out influential historical and contemporary approaches to the theorisation of place and sketches out the structure of the book, explaining the logic of the seven clearly themed sections. Each section begins with a short introductory essay that provides identifying key ideas and contextualises the essays that follow. The original and distinctive contributions from both new and leading authorities from across the discipline provide a wide, rich and comprehensive collection that chimes with current critical thinking in geography. The book captures the dynamism and multiplicity of current geographical thinking about place by including both state-of-the-art, in-depth, critical overviews of theoretical approaches to place and new explorations and cases that chart a framework for future research. It charts the multiple ways in which place might be conceived, situated and practised. This unique, comprehensive and rich collection will be an essential resource for undergraduate and graduate teaching, for experienced academics across a wide range of disciplines and for policymakers and place-marketers. It will provide an invaluable and up-to-date guide to current thinking across the range of disciplines, such as Geography, Sociology and Politics, and interdisciplinary fields such as Urban Studies, Environmental Studies and Planning.

Celebrating Urban Community Life

Place and identity. In J.J. Gieseking & W. Mangold (Eds.), The People, Place, and Space Reader, 73–81. New York: Routledge. Gieseking, J.J. & Mangold, W. (2014b). Diverse conceptions between people, place and space.

Celebrating Urban Community Life

Communal celebrations bring out the best in us, offering a place for people to come together and take a break from the routines of daily life. They are a vital aspect of city life and are increasingly popular as an urban development strategy. Celebrating Urban Community Life is a comprehensive guide to understanding and enhancing communal celebrations as a source of community capital. Drawing on case studies from New York, San Francisco, and Toronto, Melvin Delgado discusses the many ways in which fairs, festivals, and parades can enhance communal life. Providing a framework for social scientists, urban planners, and social workers to analyse and foster celebrations that benefit urban populations, the book is a valuable resource for those with an interest in this growing area of academic and practical interest.

Beyond Camps and Forced Labour

In The People, Place and Space Reader, eds. Jen Jack Gieseking and William Mangold. Oxford: Routledge. 178. 73. Testimony of Huguette Marc, Interview Code 6621, Sept. 7. 1995, VHA, USC Shoah Foundation, Tape 2, 18 min. 74. Marc. 2: 20.

Beyond Camps and Forced Labour

This book presents a selection of the newest research on themes amplified by the sixth annual Beyond Camps and Forced Labour conference on the post-Holocaust period, including ‘displaced persons’, reception and resettlement, exiles and refugees, trials and justice, reparation and restitution, and memory and testimony. The chapters highlight new, transnational approaches and findings based on underused and newly opened archives, including compensation files of the British government; on historical actors often on the periphery within English-language historiography, including Romanian and Hungarian survivors; and new approaches such as the spatial history of Drancy, as well as geographies that have undergone less scrutiny, for example, Tehran, Chile, Mexico and Cyprus. This volume represents the vibrant and varied state of research on the aftermath of the Holocaust.

A Philosophy of Landscape Construction

Flight to Arras, translated by Lewis Galantiere (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1942): 135. 2 James L. Gibson. 'The Theory of Affordances'. In The People, Place, and Space Reader, edited by Jen Jack Gieseking and William Mangold, ...

A Philosophy of Landscape Construction

A Philosophy of Landscape Construction outlines a philosophy of values in landscape construction, demonstrating how integral structures, such as pavements and walls, constitute a key element to how people interact with and inhabit the final design. The book discusses how these structures enable, assist and care for people, negotiating between the dynamic processes of site ecosystems and the soil on which they are founded. They articulate spatial, functional, cultural and ecological meanings. Within this theoretical framework, designers will learn to recognize and insert a set of core values into the most technical design stages to reach their full potential. By offering a new perspective on landscape construction, moving away from the exclusively technical characteristics, this book allows landscape architects to realise the ideal vision for their designs. It is abundantly illustrated with examples from which designers can learn both successes and failures and will be an essential companion to any study of built landscapes.

Arts in Place

Ostwald, M. J. (2009) 'Public space and public art: the metapolitics of aesthetics' in Lehmann, S. (ed.) ... Project for Public Spaces [a] (2015) The year in placemaking. ... The people, place, and space reader. New York: Routledge.

Arts in Place

This interdisciplinary book explores the role of art in placemaking in urban environments, analysing how artists and communities use arts to improve their quality of life. It explores the concept of social practice placemaking, where artists and community members are seen as equal experts in the process. Drawing on examples of local level projects from the USA and Europe, the book explores the impact of these projects on the people involved, on their relationship to the place around them, and on city policy and planning practice. Case studies include Art Tunnel Smithfield, Dublin, an outdoor art gallery and community space in an impoverished area of the city; The Drawing Shed, London, a contemporary arts practice operating in housing estates and parks in Walthamstow; and Big Car, Indianapolis, an arts organisation operating across the whole of this Midwest city. This book offers a timely contribution, bridging the gap between cultural studies and placemaking. It will be of interest to scholars, students and practitioners working in geography, urban studies, architecture, planning, sociology, cultural studies and the arts.

The Spatial Dynamics of Juvenile Series Literature

Tickamyer, Ann R. “Space Matters! Spatial Inequality in Future Sociology.” Contemporary Sociology, vol. 29, no. 6, 2000, pp. ... The People, Place, and Space Reader, edited by Jen Jack Gieseking, et al, Routledge, 2014, pp. 176-180.

The Spatial Dynamics of Juvenile Series Literature

Where we come from, where we are, where we have been, and where we are going all have a huge impact on who we are. Theories of space and place also hold that the converse is equally true—that we have an impact on those spaces and places we inhabit or dwell within. We make space: our agencies, our cultures, our beliefs and values and understandings shape the macro- and micro-environments around us. Just as much, however, those places we inhabit shape us, causing us to adapt ourselves to them. Children exist in spaces that are crafted for them by adults—by parents, by school administrators and teachers—and, as such, their impact on space can be somewhat limited. Space is made for them, but certainly not to their own specifications or liking. In children’s literature, spaces are often seen as noteworthy markers of a child’s progression toward adulthood, whether the space is Laura Ingalls’ little house or Harry Potter’s Hogwarts. For these characters, movement through space is about growth and change, about accepting the inevitability of growing up and the responsibility of the adulthood, whether that be marriage and motherhood or vanquishing the most evil wizard of all time. However, what about juvenile series books, whose central protagonists generally never grow or change? The central character of these series—usually a flat, unchanging trope more than a fully realized, fleshed-out, dynamic figure—is a static creation. Though characters like Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys frequently move through different geographies, they never change as characters. In fact, one could argue that the only dynamic that ever experiences any alteration in a series like Nancy Drew is setting. Surely there is something significant about the relationship of series books to those spaces their protagonists inhabit? This collection explores that relationship, the dynamics between the controlled spaces of childhood and the variable spaces of juvenile series literature. It shows that the unchanging series book characters demonstrate that their impact on space is far greater than its impact ever is on them, reflecting an exercise in spatial authority that most children and even children’s book heroes never quite experience.

The Discursive Construction of Identity and Space Among Mobile People

Heterotopia and the city: Public space in a postcivil society, 153–163, Milton Park, England: Routledge. Low, S. (2014), 'Spatializing culture', in J. J Gieseking et al. (eds.), The People, Place and Space Reader, 34–38, ...

The Discursive Construction of Identity and Space Among Mobile People

This book offers a close look at the discourse of and around three socially marginalised and vulnerable groups – Irish Travellers, Squatters and Homeless people – in order to understand more about how individuals within them position themselves vis-à-vis mainstream society. It investigates the groups' diverse and provisional relationship with space that challenges mainstream society's spatial logic. Given that the relationship between mobility, space and identity has been explored in migrant contexts, Roberta Piazza proposes a reconsideration of this relationship beyond people's movement from one place to another. Investigating the space-identity nexus among the three groups, she highlights how mobility is not solely a cross-country phenomenon, but a no-less crucial and dramatic reality within an individual nation. Based on close linguistic analysis of interviews collected over many years, Piazza investigates how the participants construct their social and personal identities when talking about themselves and the sites they inhabit, drawing on the concepts of 'heterotopia' and non-sexual desire.

Companion to Public Space

(2018) City Unsilenced: Urban Resistance and Public Space in the Age of Shrinking Democracy. ... Mckittrick, K. (2014) The Last Place They Thought Of. In: The People, Place, and Space Reader, Gieseking, J. J., Mangold, W., Katz, C., ...

Companion to Public Space

The Companion to Public Space draws together an outstanding multidisciplinary collection of specially commissioned chapters that offer the state of the art in the intellectual discourse, scholarship, research, and principles of understanding in the construction of public space. Thematically, the volume crosses disciplinary boundaries and traverses territories to address the philosophical, political, legal, planning, design, and management issues in the social construction of public space. The Companion uniquely assembles important voices from diverse fields of philosophy, political science, geography, anthropology, sociology, urban design and planning, architecture, art, and many more, under one cover. It addresses the complete ecology of the topic to expose the interrelated issues, challenges, and opportunities of public space in the twenty-first century. The book is primarily intended for scholars and graduate students for whom it will provide an invaluable and up-to-date guide to current thinking across the range of disciplines that converge in the study of public space. The Companion will also be of use to practitioners and public officials who deal with the planning, design, and management of public spaces.

Pseudo Public Spaces in Chinese Shopping Malls

The People, Place, and Space Reader. New York: Routledge, pp. 111–115. Dovey, K., 2016. Place as multiplicity. In R. Freestone and E. Liu, eds. Place and Placelessness Revisited. New York: Routledge, pp. 257–268.

Pseudo Public Spaces in Chinese Shopping Malls

Shopping malls in China create a new pseudo-public urban space which is under the control of private or quasi-public power structure. As they are open for public use, mediated by the co-mingling of private property rights and public meanings of urban space, the rise, publicness and consequences of the boom in the construction of shopping malls raises major questions in spatial political economy and magnifies existing theoretical debates between the natural and conventional schools of property rights. In examining these issues this book develops a theoretical framework starting with a critique of the socio-spatial debate between two influential bodies of work represented by the work of Henri Lefebvre and David Harvey. Drawing on the framework, the book examines why pseudo-public spaces have been growing so rapidly in China since the 1980s; assesses to what degree pseudo-public spaces are public, and how they affect the publicness of Chinese cities; and explores the consequences of their rise. Findings of this book provide insights that can help to better understand Chinese urbanism and also have the potential to inform urban policy in China. This book will be of interest to academics and researchers in both Chinese studies and urban studies.

The Power of Culture in City Planning

Section 3 – Place and identity: Editors' introduction and suggestions for further reading. In J. J. Gieseking & W. Mangold (Eds.), The people, place, and space reader (pp. 73–76). New York, NY: Routledge. Giuliani, M. V. (2003).

The Power of Culture in City Planning

The Power of Culture in City Planning focuses on human diversity, strengths, needs, and ways of living together in geographic communities. The book turns attention to the anthropological definition of culture, encouraging planners in both urban and cultural planning to focus on characteristics of humanity in all their variety. It calls for a paradigm shift, re-positioning city planners’ "base maps" to start with a richer understanding of human cultures. Borrup argues for cultural master plans in parallel to transportation, housing, parks, and other specialized plans, while also changing the approach of city comprehensive planning to put people or "users" first rather than land "uses" as does the dominant practice. Cultural plans as currently conceived are not sufficient to help cities keep pace with dizzying impacts of globalization, immigration, and rapidly changing cultural interests. Cultural planners need to up their game, and enriching their own and city planners’ cultural competencies is only one step. Both planning practices have much to learn from one another and already overlap in more ways than most recognize. This book highlights some of the strengths of the lesser-known practice of cultural planning to help forge greater understanding and collaboration between the two practices, empowering city planners with new tools to bring about more equitable communities. This will be an important resource for students, teachers, and practitioners of city and cultural planning, as well as municipal policymakers of all stripes.

Planting New Towns in Europe in the Interwar Years

2 J.J. Gieseking and William Mangold, ed., The People, Place, and Space Reader (New York/London: Routledge, 2014) xxiii. 3 “Human perception and environmental experience,” in Gieseking and Mangold, The People, Place, and Space Reader, ...

Planting New Towns in Europe in the Interwar Years

The key theme of the papers in this book concerns the prospects of building new urban environments and creating new societies in Europe during the interwar years. The contributions do not focus on the system of government – communist, fascist or democratic – but, rather, on what actually got built, by whom and why; and how the international communication of ideas was filtered through the prism of local concerns and culture. As such, the volume serves to tease out connections between urban form and social aspirations, and between the moral basis of social planning and how it was interpreted. Did the new towns of the interwar years actually create a planned society where visions met realities, aided by the design of new urban forms? This is one of the principal questions investigated by the contributors here in all the different political contexts of their chosen ‘new towns’.

ITJEMAST 12 2 2021

Spacetime and the world. In J. J. Gieseking, W. Mangold, C. Katz, S. Low, & S. Saegert (Eds.), The people, place, and space reader. New York: Routledge. Heft, H. (2013). Behaviour settings. Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions, 188.

ITJEMAST 12 2  2021

International Transaction Journal of Engineering, Management, & Applied Sciences & Technologies publishes a wide spectrum of research and technical articles as well as reviews, experiments, experiences, modelings, simulations, designs, and innovations from engineering, sciences, life sciences, and related disciplines as well as interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary/multidisciplinary subjects. Original work is required. Article submitted must not be under consideration of other publishers for publications.

Place and Placelessness Revisited

Gieseking, J. and W. Mangold (Eds.) (2014) The People, Place, and Space Reader, New York: Routledge. Gold, J. (2000) “Commentary 1,” Progress in Human Geography 24, 613–615. Güller, M. (2015) “From Sprawl to City: A Vision for ...

Place and Placelessness Revisited

Since its publication in 1976, Ted Relph’s Place and Placelessness has been an influential text in thinking about cities and city life across disciplines, including human geography, sociology, architecture, planning, and urban design. For four decades, ideas put forward by this seminal work have continued to spark debates, from the concept of placelessness itself through how it plays out in our societies to how city designers might respond to its challenge in practice. Drawing on evidence from Australian, British, Japanese, and North and South American urban settings, Place and Placelessness Revisited is a collection of cutting edge empirical research and theoretical discussions of contemporary applications and interpretations of place and placelessness. It takes a multi-disciplinary approach, including contributions from across the breadth of disciplines in the built environment – architecture, environmental psychology, geography, landscape architecture, planning, sociology, and urban design – in critically re-visiting placelessness in theory and its relevance for twenty-first century contexts.

Place

... People, Place and Space Reader – a r product of an interdisciplinary team of editors based in and around New York. The site includes a number of key readings made available for free. www.acme-journal.org The site for a wonderful ...

Place

Thoroughly revised and updated, this text introduces students of human geography and allied disciplines to the fundamental concept of place, combining discussion about everyday uses of the term with the complex theoretical debates that have grown up around it. • A thoroughly revised and updated edition of this highly successful short introduction to place • Features a new chapter on the use of place in non-geographical arenas, such as in ecological theory, art theory and practice, philosophy, and social theory • Combines discussion about everyday uses of the term ‘place’ with the more complex theoretical debates that have grown up around it • Uses familiar stories drawn from the news, popular culture, and everyday life as a way to explain abstract ideas and debates • Traces the development of the concept from the 1950s through its subsequent appropriation by cultural geographers, and the linking of place to politics

Theory in the Post Era

In Jen Jack Gieseking and William Mangold, eds., The People, Place, and Space Reader, 56–61. New York: Routledge, 2014. Gieseking, Jen Jack, and William Mangolds, eds. The People, Place, and Space Reader. New York: Routledge, 2014.

Theory in the  Post  Era

Theory in the "Post" Era brings together the work and perspectives of a group of Romanian theorists who discuss the morphings of contemporary theory in what the editors call the “post” era. Since the Cold War's end and especially in the third millennium, theorists have been exploring the aftermath - and sometimes just the “after” - of whole paradigms, the crisis or “passing” of anthropocentrism, the twilight of an entire ontological and cultural “condition,” as well as the corresponding rise of an antagonist model, of an “anti,” “meta,” or “neo” alternative, with examples ranging from “posthumanism” and “post-postmodernism” to “post-aesthetics,” “postanalog” interpretation or “digicriticism,” “post-presentism,” “post-memory,” “post-“ or “neo-critique,” and so forth. It is no coincidence, the contributors to this volume argue, that this “post” moment is also a time when theory is practiced as a world genre. If theory has always been a “worlded” enterprise, a quintessentially communal, cross-cultural and international project, this is truer at present than ever. Perhaps more than other humanist constituencies, today's theorists work and belong in a theory commons that is transnational if still uneven economically, politically, and otherwise. Theory in the "Post" Era reports the results of Romanian theory experiments that join efforts made in other places to foster a theory for the “post” age.

Reconstructing Minds and Landscapes

In Jen Jack Gieseking & William Mangold (eds) The People, Place, and Space Reader. New York: Routledge, 278–282. Edwards, Sian (2019) A richness that is lacking now: Country childhoods, nostalgia and rural change in the mass observation ...

Reconstructing Minds and Landscapes

Mental and material reconstruction was an ongoing process after World War II, and it still is. This volume combines a detailed treatment of post-war cultural reconstruction in Finnish Lapland – a region on the geographical and historical margins of its nation-state – with comparative case studies of silent post-war memory from other European countries The contributors shed light on key aspects of cultural reconstruction generally: disruptions of national narratives, difficulties of post-war cultural demobilisation, sites of memory, visual narratives of post-war reconstruction, and manifestations of trans-generational experiences of cultural reconstruction. Exploration of the less conspicuous aspects of mental reconstruction reveals various forms of post-war silence and silencing which have halted or hindered different groups of people in their mental return to peace. Rather than focusing on the “executive level” of material reconstruction, the volume turns its gaze towards those who experienced the return to peace in the mental, societal, and historical margins: members of ethnic, religious, and cultural minorities, women, and children. The chapters draw on archival and other original sources, personal memories, autobiographical interpretations, and academic debate. The volume is relevant for scholars and advanced students in the fields of cultural history, art history, and cultural studies.

The Spaces and Places of Canadian Popular Culture

In The People, Place, and Space Reader, edited by Jen Jack Gieseking and William Mangold, with Cindi Katz, Setha Low, and Susan Saegert, n.p. Open Access. http://peopleplacespace.org/toc/ introduction/ Government of Canada. 1951.

The Spaces and Places of Canadian Popular Culture

An exclusively Canadian textbook, this collection investigates the relationships between identity, geography, and popular culture that are produced and consumed in this sprawling country. Expanding beyond the clichés of friendliness and snow, this text provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Canadian, both nationally and transnationally. Scholars look at historical subjects like Québécois identity and Indigenous self-representation and explore issues in contemporary media, including music, film, television, comic books, video games, and social media. From Drake to the Tragically Hip, Trailer Park Boys to The Amazing Race Canada, and poutine to maple syrup, mainstream icons and trends are studied in the interdisciplinary context of race, gender, sexuality, politics, and patriotism. Contributing to the location of Canadian popular culture, this unique resource will engage students and scholars of communication studies, cultural studies, and Canadian studies. FEATURES - Includes key concepts and theories and a glossary - Engages students with relatable historical and contemporary examples of Canadiana through a breadth of media, including television shows, websites, journals, celebrities, newspapers, literature, comic books, video games, music, and films - Ensures equal representation of a national and transnational Canada, which includes examples of race, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, with particular attention to geographical intricacies that contain all provinces and territories